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MCM1986 MCM1986 is offline
 
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What do do after teaching English abroad
Old 06-21-2020, 02:03 PM
 
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Howdy,

I'm asking for myself and many of my friends. I taught ESL in China and elsewhere for a few years. I have all the skills needed (e.g., classroom management, lesson planning, etc.), but I'm not sure how to enter the K-12 or even community college market here in the US now that I'm back (due to Covid 19).

I don't necessarily have to teach ESL; I'm flexible. I just want to continue teaching. I only have a B.A. and I'm not in a position to go back to school. I have a family to support.

Does anyone have experience with this?


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I'm guessing your degree isn't in education?
Old 06-21-2020, 05:49 PM
 
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Many states have alternative certification programs. With your teaching experience, and a bachelor's degree you should be able to apply for a job and then work to complete whatever additional requirements you might need while working on a temporary certificate. You will need to check with your state's department of education for specifics in your area. Good luck!
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Old 06-21-2020, 08:27 PM
 
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Welcome home. I hope things fall into place for you soon.

In my area at least, community college teaching requires a subject area master's degree, so that would be a non-starter.

If you know what state you will be living in, start by looking at certification requirements there. Compare what classes and experience, etc. you have to that list. Then start asking around to find out whether your state is highly competitive in hiring or if there are always openings. The more openings the more likely they are to hire someone who is not fully credentialed--perhaps someone working on an alternative certification path.

If you aren't tied down to one state, do a little looking to choose states where you might like to live and which seem to be more open to someone with your unusual set of experience and skills.

Oh, by the way, how's your Chinese? Maybe you can find a position teaching Chinese.
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Old 06-22-2020, 06:46 AM
 
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In my area we have Dual Language Immersion programs and some of them are offered in Chinese. If you can speak the language fluently, you would be snapped up. You could obtain an emergency license and take classes to get your degree while working. There are federal grants available for ESL teachers, too, which might pay a good chunk of tuition.
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Old 06-22-2020, 04:15 PM
 
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I'm more or less fluent in Chinese, but there are so many Chinese immigrants in the US who'd be happy to take that job who speak it fluently, I doubt I would be "allowed" to teach Chinese, even though I think I know how to learn Chinese better than a native does because I did it.

I speak Chinese in my home, wife and I are raising our daughter to speak both languages.


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Old 06-22-2020, 04:16 PM
 
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We are in Chicago but open to relocating. My Chinese is definitely good enough to teach until a conversation level. I can read and write the characters as well as I can speak.

Thanks for all the advice. This is an active, helpful community. I appreciate it.
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Old 06-23-2020, 06:44 AM
 
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Quote:
but there are so many Chinese immigrants in the US who'd be happy to take that job who speak it fluently,
I think that depends on where you are. You said Chicago, so I can see where that might be true in the city. But I'm in Wisconsin and every single year there are postings for Chinese teachers. One district here has a Chinese program as part of its International School and they are asking for teachers literally every year. My old district offered Chinese in Elementary - High School and could never find people.

The difficulty is finding people who are fluent in Chinese and who also hold the right teaching licenses. Here you would have to have an elementary ed license with a certification in ESL. (Both of which you could obtain simultaneously through the same college program, while you work in the school on an emergency license.) I know our Chinese teachers struggled with classroom management, in part because they were hired for the language, not for having any teaching skills. A person who has both skills would be in demand.
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Old 06-23-2020, 04:09 PM
 
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Interesting. I really appreciate these insights. Do they post these jobs on typical job websites? I haven't really found any.

I could definitely teach k-12 Chinese. I speak Chinese with my 2yo daughter daily, and with my wife. I have some transferable graduate credits as well, probably...

This is why I want to stay in education. Educators stick together and help one another out. I appreciate the earnestness of everyones' responses, very much.
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Old 06-25-2020, 09:10 PM
 
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Illinois is a tough state to get licensed in when you donít do it as part of an undergraduate program because of the semester of unpaid internship. Thereís been noise about changing it, but nothing groundbreaking yet as far as I know. Last I knew, Florida is usually looking for teachers and they have a much easier system in place for career changers. If relocation is an option, that may be a state to consider.
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Old 06-26-2020, 04:29 PM
 
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My wife would like Florida. Thanks for the insight.


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