Sadly, I was expecting this news - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      The VENT

Sadly, I was expecting this news

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
sonoma's Avatar
sonoma sonoma is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2010
Posts: 2,213
Senior Member

sonoma
 
sonoma's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2010
Posts: 2,213
Senior Member
Sadly, I was expecting this news
Old 06-22-2020, 09:50 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

https://www.eastbaytimes.com/2020/06...eat-recession/


sonoma is offline   Reply With Quote

GreyhoundGirl's Avatar
GreyhoundGirl GreyhoundGirl is online now
 
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 21,202
Senior Member

GreyhoundGirl
 
GreyhoundGirl's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 21,202
Senior Member

Old 06-22-2020, 09:53 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

Yeah, me too. I think it's going to get worse before it gets better. I'm waiting to see what comes out of New York and CPS.
GreyhoundGirl is online now   Reply With Quote
MightyTeach's Avatar
MightyTeach MightyTeach is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2014
Posts: 1,295
Senior Member

MightyTeach
 
MightyTeach's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2014
Posts: 1,295
Senior Member

Old 06-22-2020, 10:02 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

Oh no! Not more bad news.
MightyTeach is offline   Reply With Quote
Izzy23 Izzy23 is online now
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,629
Senior Member

Izzy23
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,629
Senior Member

Old 06-22-2020, 10:17 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

Happening here, too. Not sure how they're going to implement their great social distancing plans when they get rid of staff.
Izzy23 is online now   Reply With Quote
Youthcantknow's Avatar
Youthcantknow Youthcantknow is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2012
Posts: 809
Senior Member

Youthcantknow
 
Youthcantknow's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2012
Posts: 809
Senior Member
silent scream
Old 06-22-2020, 10:36 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

Can't they find other areas to cut from?! How hard do they look for other solutions before choosing education as their target?


Youthcantknow is offline   Reply With Quote
GreyhoundGirl's Avatar
GreyhoundGirl GreyhoundGirl is online now
 
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 21,202
Senior Member

GreyhoundGirl
 
GreyhoundGirl's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2008
Posts: 21,202
Senior Member

Old 06-22-2020, 10:52 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

I feel like education is always the first on the chopping block. People, and especially politicians, feel like teachers are overpaid and there are always resources that can be cut. Its truly a shame. The kids suffer.
GreyhoundGirl is online now   Reply With Quote
wildflowerz's Avatar
wildflowerz wildflowerz is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2012
Posts: 5,520
Senior Member

wildflowerz
 
wildflowerz's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2012
Posts: 5,520
Senior Member

Old 06-22-2020, 10:58 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

Getting rid of staff is never the answer. Our union has already reopened the contract and worked with the school board to save money. It is complicated but the increase they were going to get has been reduced and it will happen midway through the year instead of at the beginning. It will save the district about 2 million over the next couple years. No one wants to give up money but it is better than losing a job.

They also agreed to limit the steps a person can move up due to continuing education.

We did the half-step salary increases in the past and it worked really well.
wildflowerz is offline   Reply With Quote
amiga13's Avatar
amiga13 amiga13 is offline
 
Joined: Feb 2014
Posts: 19,505
Senior Member

amiga13
 
amiga13's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2014
Posts: 19,505
Senior Member

Old 06-22-2020, 11:04 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #8

Yup. When all these huge expenses were made for Covid (including stimulus checks and unemployment), many of us oldies nodded and said, “Are people understanding the money has to come from somewhere?” Time to pay the piper? I’m not saying it’s good, I’m just saying cuts have to happen.

And as long as I’m looking through the dismal-lens, I think the guy from the article is overly optimistic about how the public views teachers. I think right now much of the public is looking for childcare.
Quote:
“I think we’re entering this recession with a strong public regard for teachers as a force and a general public understanding that more investment in public schools was necessary, and issues that surround schools like counseling, nurses, etc. And I think that public understanding makes it even more challenging for districts to make cuts.”
amiga13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Tapdancesub Tapdancesub is offline
 
Joined: Feb 2015
Posts: 562
Senior Member

Tapdancesub
 
Joined: Feb 2015
Posts: 562
Senior Member

Old 06-22-2020, 11:23 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #9

The Pink Slips were going out the week they shut down the schools. The neighboring teacher in the class i was covering the last day before the shutdown got hers. This was already in the pipeline even before the Shelter in Place began.
Tapdancesub is offline   Reply With Quote
twin2 twin2 is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2006
Posts: 15,761
Senior Member

twin2
 
Joined: Aug 2006
Posts: 15,761
Senior Member

Old 06-22-2020, 11:32 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #10

That's sad. I've been wondering how all of this will affect my area, my job, and my chances of getting the job I want. I'm thinking about applying for a job I don't want, because I'm worried whether the one I want will be available.


twin2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Gromit's Avatar
Gromit Gromit is online now
 
Joined: Mar 2009
Posts: 9,755
Senior Member

Gromit
 
Gromit's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2009
Posts: 9,755
Senior Member

Old 06-22-2020, 11:46 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #11

Was there any teacher who wasn't expecting this? It's one of the first things I thought about at the start of lockdowns.

Quote:

And as long as Im looking through the dismal-lens, I think the guy from the article is overly optimistic about how the public views teachers. I think right now much of the public is looking for childcare.
Quote:
I think were entering this recession with a strong public regard for teachers as a force and a general public understanding that more investment in public schools was necessary, and issues that surround schools like counseling, nurses, etc. And I think that public understanding makes it even more challenging for districts to make cuts.
Yep, everyone said "Oh this will be so good for teachers!" Memes were being made about how awesome teachers are and how wonderful school is. But they weren't about education or the value of teachers. Not really. They were about parents having to face how awful their children have become after farming out parenting to schools, aftercare, and clubs for so long. They don't want their kids educated. They want them babysat. And now that there's the possibility of re-opening, they don't care about what's best for the education of their children. They just want whatever needs to happen to get their children out of their house.
Gromit is online now   Reply With Quote
Keltikmom's Avatar
Keltikmom Keltikmom is online now
 
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 10,331
Senior Member

Keltikmom
 
Keltikmom's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2013
Posts: 10,331
Senior Member
Education cuts
Old 06-22-2020, 12:32 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #12

Education budget always gets cut first because, on paper, it looks like a huge amount. No one ever stops to ask the question: Why is this budget so big? What is the reason? If some politician would realize how much it costs to educate children, maintain infrastructure, etc. maybe theyd leave our budgets alone.
Keltikmom is online now   Reply With Quote
Haley23 Haley23 is online now
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 7,792
Senior Member

Haley23
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 7,792
Senior Member

Old 06-22-2020, 12:54 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #13

Sometimes I think there needs to be some sort of nationwide strike or we at least need to do something. Teachers are so quick to just accept whatever the situation is. Yes, I think many are wanting schools just open for day care, but the absolute desperation to get them open shows just how badly needed we are.

Society can't function without us, yet there is no talk of any sort of "bail out" for education while the government bails out other industries without blinking an eye. For profit industries whose CEOs will callously tell people having a hard time right now that they should have saved for emergencies. Well why didn't your company that was making huge profits save for emergencies??

I do think public perception regarding teacher has improved over the years. I remember feeling like teachers were public enemy #1 my first few years of teaching. There was constant press and discussion about it. I remember watching news stories where they'd be discussing how teaching is a part time job (not just arguing summers off- saying, "they're done at 2:30") it was never meant to be a job to support a family, the pay and benefits are great compared to what little work there is, etc.

Of course there are still individuals who believe this and a politician will make an asinine comment here and there but I NEVER hear anything like this on news outlets anymore, and teacher bashing no longer seems to be a popular political talking point. Our big city district went on strike last year and largely got what they asked for, which was attributed to the massive public support they had. I notice this time around that the same news stations are now careful to say something such as, "schools that were already underfunded are expecting more cuts..."

Funding in my state was abysmal to begin with. We never recovered from the 2008 recession despite having a (pre-covid) booming state economy. Many teachers were already leaving because they simply can't afford to live here, and we were already getting into a shortage. Most rural districts are already on 4 day weeks. The situation wasn't like that at all going into 2008. My super says rural districts will be insolvent come 21-22 if big changes aren't made, and we wouldn't be far behind. I know the situation is not as dire in other states. But if we're looking at more lock downs in the future, I honestly don't know that there will be public schools to go back to. The only thing that I see helping at all is maybe there will federal money coming if things change with the election.
Haley23 is online now   Reply With Quote
readandweep readandweep is offline
 
Joined: May 2012
Posts: 2,502
Senior Member

readandweep
 
Joined: May 2012
Posts: 2,502
Senior Member
Cuts
Old 06-22-2020, 12:56 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #14

This is not surprising, but I sincerely hope they look to cut or send back to the classroom the numerous coaches and curriculum specialists.

This also goes into the thred I started about evaluations.

After this upcoming school year I will have tenure.

If we make cuts, it would be the first time cuts are being made under the point-system evaluation model.
readandweep is offline   Reply With Quote
AlwaysSummer
 
 
Guest

AlwaysSummer
 
 
Guest

Old 06-22-2020, 04:27 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #15

Haley, public schools in general will probably be dead in 20 years anyway. In my area, you could be a PhD and not get in if you don't have connections. This is a bad area. I see charter and private schools with teachers who have MAs and higher because they can't get in to public schools. I don't blame good parents for choosing them. Charter and private can pick and choose who they want.


Honestly, in my experience, students are the biggest expense. Olga doesn't speak English? Let's give her a one on one who literally will tell everyone with a great big smile (even when Olga is absent) "That's not my job" to anything else. Let's keep paying those janitors who do nothing, have no education, and get salary and pension. Mommy and daddy can't drive Johnny to school. Let's not cut the bus, gas, insurance, and driver's pay. Mommies and daddies get mad, we need to have lawyers that make way more than the teachers. The children might get sick. Every school needs a nurse. You know, because it's not like the child just sits/lays there until a guardian can get them to a doctor/hospital. Let's just fire the nontenured teachers.
  Reply With Quote
Lilbitkm's Avatar
Lilbitkm Lilbitkm is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 2,377
Senior Member

Lilbitkm
 
Lilbitkm's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 2,377
Senior Member

Old 06-23-2020, 05:18 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #16

Quote:
Honestly, in my experience, students are the biggest expense. Olga doesn't speak English? Let's give her a one on one who literally will tell everyone with a great big smile (even when Olga is absent) "That's not my job" to anything else. Let's keep paying those janitors who do nothing, have no education, and get salary and pension. Mommy and daddy can't drive Johnny to school. Let's not cut the bus, gas, insurance, and driver's pay. Mommies and daddies get mad, we need to have lawyers that make way more than the teachers. The children might get sick. Every school needs a nurse. You know, because it's not like the child just sits/lays there until a guardian can get them to a doctor/hospital. Let's just fire the nontenured teachers.


I’m not sure what school/school district you work in (if you even do) but this is just hilarious.
First of all, a 1:1 aid for non English speakers? We have at least 3 non English speakers per class each year, times around 50 classrooms. We have one bilingual assistant who works with specific kids once a week.
The hoops to get a 1:1 aid are monumental. I haven’t seen one in my 11 years teaching and I taught self contained special education for three years.

Janitors? The majority of custodial staff that I’ve had at my building have been amazing. We out source our custodial services now but they are paid hourly, have no retirement pay in, and do a job that I sure as hell wouldn’t want to do! They have no education... who cares? Are they appropriately doing their job?

Buses are essential in my area and only travel in a certain radius. We have tons of students who walk home because they can’t get bus services.
Our school nurse, while not an RN, is absolutely essential and out school wouldn’t run as well without her.
Lilbitkm is offline   Reply With Quote
jazzer jazzer is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 5,419
Senior Member

jazzer
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 5,419
Senior Member

Old 06-23-2020, 06:34 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #17

Some of that sounds far fetched, but I am a 1 on 1 assistant and half the assistants at my school are as well. Before I got my job, I interviewed at many other districts in my area for 1 on 1 positions. I live in the third largest metro area in the country so that could have something to do with it.

I do think putting a ton of money into state testing at the expense of firing teachers is terrible. I heard that Georgia cancelled their state testing for the 20-21 school year and will put the 10 million dollars it would cost into salaries.
jazzer is offline   Reply With Quote
sonoma's Avatar
sonoma sonoma is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2010
Posts: 2,213
Senior Member

sonoma
 
sonoma's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2010
Posts: 2,213
Senior Member
AlwaysSummer
Old 06-23-2020, 09:15 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #18

Your experience is very different than mine.

True, PhD and masters make it harder to initially get hired because schools have to start them a higher salary. I always advise new teachers to get hired first, then complete their masters.

We do not have any 1:1 aides for English language learners. The classroom teacher is responsible. We also do not have librarians, art or PE teachers. Students get music class two days a month.

Our janitors work very hard. They are required to have a high school diploma. They make around $30,000 and their pension is significant lower than teachers'.

We don't have buses. That was cut in 2008. Kids walk, use public transportation or car pool. Very few parents are around to drive them to school - most have to commute to work long before school opens.

We have one day a week with a school nurse.

It is terrible that any teacher has to lose their job, but when most of the budget is spent on salaries in a time of financial crisis there is little left to cut.
sonoma is offline   Reply With Quote
MalloryJames MalloryJames is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2020
Posts: 108
New Member

MalloryJames
 
Joined: Jun 2020
Posts: 108
New Member

Old 06-23-2020, 10:04 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #19

So, what's the plan for after they fire 50,000 teachers? 70 kids in a class?
MalloryJames is offline   Reply With Quote
sonoma's Avatar
sonoma sonoma is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2010
Posts: 2,213
Senior Member

sonoma
 
sonoma's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2010
Posts: 2,213
Senior Member
MalloryJames
Old 06-23-2020, 10:40 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #20

50,000 is about a 14% reduction. In my local school that would be 7 teachers. With previous RIFs our class sizes went from 34 to 40.

But with required social distancing, everything changes.

There are a lot of credentialed teachers who are not currently assigned to the classroom.

Also,with distance learning, school districts can increase class size online since there is no wording in current contracts that covers this.

A few schools have offered part time positions to reduce class size. Some teachers may decide to retire earlier than planned.

Bottom line is seniority. In 2008 we RIFed teachers who had 11 years or less.
sonoma is offline   Reply With Quote
Song of Joy Song of Joy is online now
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 2,669
Senior Member

Song of Joy
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 2,669
Senior Member

Old 06-23-2020, 11:51 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #21

This is very sobering and the longer our economy is shut down, the deeper these cuts will grow.

I'm also concerned that remote learning might be developed using fewer teachers,
Song of Joy is online now   Reply With Quote
Starr Starr is online now
 
Joined: Dec 2017
Posts: 964
Senior Member

Starr
 
Joined: Dec 2017
Posts: 964
Senior Member
Georgia
Old 06-23-2020, 12:37 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #22

I like the idea of cutting standardized tests to save money.
Plus, some of the useless PD that has little to do with actual instruction.
Starr is online now   Reply With Quote
Lilbitkm's Avatar
Lilbitkm Lilbitkm is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 2,377
Senior Member

Lilbitkm
 
Lilbitkm's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 2,377
Senior Member

Old 06-23-2020, 06:39 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #23

The fact your school has so many 1:1 assistants in your school is amazing. It doesn’t happen here.
You have that many 1:1 assistants for non English speakers? I couldn’t see any of our schools having the budget to support that based on how many we have. Again, even for special education students it normally only happens for severe medical needs and many times that’s a nurse paid for through insurance not employed by the school district.


I work at one of the largest school districts in my state and one of the top 10 in the country so it’s definitely not a small district.


We do have a full time librarian. Our students also get PE (3x), Art, and Music class weekly. They also are required to get 20 minutes of daily recess in elementary school. We have a state law that outlines minutes for structured physical activity (PE) and minutes for unstructured physical activity (recess).


However, we also have 4 instructional coaches at my school, I see those positions being cut and them being moved back into classrooms.

I WISH they would cancel/cut state testing. They did the opposite and the majority of the CARES money here is going towards more state testing
Lilbitkm is offline   Reply With Quote
jazzer jazzer is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 5,419
Senior Member

jazzer
 
Joined: Oct 2007
Posts: 5,419
Senior Member

Old 06-23-2020, 07:28 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #24

My district has several kindergarten classrooms specifically dedicated to ELL students with a few ELL assistants who work with students in small groups. The 1 to 1 assistants are mostly for special education students and those with certain behavioral issues.
jazzer is offline   Reply With Quote
Dzani Dzani is offline
 
Joined: May 2020
Posts: 11
New Member

Dzani
 
Joined: May 2020
Posts: 11
New Member
Yes!
Old 06-24-2020, 10:14 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #25

Just yes! Oh, and the new football field our district is STILL bragging about putting in? Replacing all those brand new computers? Yeah, that too. I wouldn't mind losing that extra layer of overpaid admin they call instructional coaches, either. Hey, problem solved! We can even get raises now.
Dzani is offline   Reply With Quote
Jessica123 Jessica123 is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 32
Junior Member

Jessica123
 
Joined: Jul 2020
Posts: 32
Junior Member
Too Good To Be True!
Old 07-03-2020, 01:39 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #26

I knew teaching from home in my pajamas was too good to be true!
Oh no!

SILENTLY SCREAMING AND RUNNING AROUND LIKE A CRAZY PERSON IN MY HEAD!
Jessica123 is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
The VENT
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 09:49 PM.

Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net