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jahlenius jahlenius is offline
 
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jahlenius
 
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Should I have my own child as a student?
Old 06-27-2009, 03:33 PM
 
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What are your thoughts about having your own child in your classroom. I have a 2nd grader, she was identified high ability and I teach the high abilty kids in 2nd grade. I am so torn about what to do. Any suggestions? We only have a cluster of kids 4-5 identified in second grade. I need some suggestions


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I think it depends on the kid, and you.
Old 06-27-2009, 03:46 PM
 
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How will she act in the classroom? Are you Mrs. Smith there, or Mom? Can she adapt to seeing you as her teacher, and acting as a student? Can you adapt to treating her like any other student? Will you need to be more strict with her in order to avoid the label of favoritism?

On the other hand, you don't need to be in the gifted cluster to have a successful school year. I had an identified gifted student in my inclusion class last year. Her mother felt that her child couldn't deal with the pressure and demands of the gifted cluster teacher. (I thought her mother was wrong, but that's another story.) Anyhow, the child thrived in my classroom.

Another question you could ask yourself: with only 4-5 identified gifted students, you will really have a mixed ability classroom. Are there pull-outs with the gifted teacher? If so, she'll still get that. How much do you differentiate for your gifted students? Can you offer that differentiation to another teacher on your grade level, so that she can supply it for your child? Can you offer it at home?

I knew one 3rd grade teacher who sent her daughter to another school rather than teach her (she was the only 3rd grade teacher) but kept her son in her classroom a few years later. She felt like she made the right decision both times. At the time, I was not a teacher, but my daughter was in that class. As a parent I didn't see it as an issue, and neither did my daughter, but maybe some other parents and kids might have. I never heard, but I'm not the type to be in touch with all the gossip that goes around.
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I've done it
Old 07-06-2009, 07:11 PM
 
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Two years ago I had my son in my 4th grade general ed classroom (he attended the GT pull-out once a week) He also went to the 5th grade classroom for math every day, so we both got a break. I had him the year before for 4th grade math as well. It was definitely a different year. I was Mom - everyone knew it anyway. There were benefits and drawbacks, but I'd do it again. One thing I'd recommend is that your DH become the homework monitor for that year. I also had him this last year for 6th grade advanced math (I changed positions) and he really surprised me today when he said he wished I could be his math teacher again this mext year. I really push the kids and help them to strech their minds. At our small school, there was no choice for us; I don't know what I would have done given the choice. Good luck with your decision.
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I had my son in gifted pull-out
Old 07-08-2009, 05:03 AM
 
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I had my son one day a week in gifted pull-out. It worked out fine and he is a good kid, but at first he did expect me to mommy him and acted out a bit to see what I would do. The first week I put him outside the room for 5 minutes time out for acting silly--that's all it took. Let her know she is a student in your classroom like everyone else and you expect the same behavior from her as you do your other students. Grading seemed funny though--but I did it as I would do any other child.
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What a tough question!
Old 07-08-2009, 05:49 AM
 
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I teach first and my DS will be in first this year. He is not in my classroom this year, but was in summer school. These were the two areas that showed up as difficulties for me:

1. There were a few times when my heart hurt for him as other children were asking to sit by me at our morning meeting. He's an only child and has never had to "share" me. He did okay with it, but I still remember when he popped up to me before reading a book and whispered to me, "Can I sit in your lap, Mommy?" After summer school was over, he said to me, "Now I don't have to share you anymore Mommy!"

2. The kids KNEW he was my son. There were times that, rather than talk to him themselves, they would come right to me. Now this obviously could be "cured" quickly, but it is an uncomfortable feeling to be the teacher and the mom in situations like that.

Now, on the positive side, I knew exactly how I instructed and how I handled behavior problems. I'm not saying that my way is "RIGHT," but it is what I would hope for my DS. Even though he will be in a classroom with a teacher that I trust, I obviously would know exactly what was happening if he was in my own room.

I probably didn't help a bit, but thought I could at least share some of my experiences. Good luck to you.


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Old 07-12-2009, 07:44 PM
 
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I had both of my children (GATE identified ... now 21 and 17) as 5th graders.

I was "mom" and I loved every minute. We didn't have a single issue and it was such a blessing to watch them learn and interact with their peers. It's a true gift that few people get to receive.

Next year, I'll have my nephew.... It's time to toughen him up a bit.

Chele :-)
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Cindy B Cindy B is offline
 
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1st grade dd in my classroom
Old 07-12-2009, 08:22 PM
 
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I have also had this experience at a much younger level. I was a Reading Recovery teacher and 1st grade teacher (job-share situation) with my daughter. That meant she had a different teacher in the morning for math, science, social studies. I taught the reading and writing portion of the day in the afternoon. With my reading experience as a teacher, Sam was reading at a 7th grade level...and needed vocabulary reinforcement to catch up to her abilities to "word-call."

I gave her an option. She could have me handle situations as a teacher or at home. If the situation made it to the parking lot, I was MOM. Her preference was to be treated like the other kids and deal with issues during school.

We both progressed through the year beautifully. Her reading vocabulary was able to make huge gains because I knew exactly what she needed. Her writing abilities were also enhanced. I had a group of gifted 1st graders who could be trusted to work on advanced reading projects.

The best part was that she called me Mrs. B....like the rest of the children. (She still does when I do not hear "Mom" in the store!) It was a full month before the 1st graders began to figure out that I was Sam's mom!

It worked for us. Consider your daughter's sense of self and if she can share you. Also, consider making rules between the two of you before the school year begins!
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I had both my sons
Old 07-19-2009, 09:21 AM
 
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as third graders one will be a sophmore, and the other a 5th grader. I was "Mom" but it was never a problem. I also had my older son as a 4th grader for reading ( I taught 3rd and 4th grade reading that year). As a third grader I didn't have any problems with anyone, but as a 4th grader I had a problem with 1 parent -- mostly complaining about my high expectations (her child got his first C --class can't live up to the potential of a few). Problem as I saw it was that my expectations hadn't changed since third but in third they had to pass the state assessment or be retained and in fourth they didn't so the parents didn't make him study or do homework like they did in third.
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jahlenius jahlenius is offline
 
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I decided to not have her as a student
Old 08-10-2009, 05:05 AM
 
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I worried so much about her being in my classroom, but she is ok with it. I overheard her talking with another student and she said it was for the best because I am her mommy. She will be in my classroom for 30 minutes a day. So I hope it all works out. Thanks for your advice.
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Am trying this in college
Old 01-28-2012, 03:45 PM
 
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My 18-year old son is currently in my college class. Our campus has 15,000 students and my son doesn't particularly look like me, so I'm hoping we can keep his identity low-profile in the class, although there are one or two students in the class who know him from high school. Due to his major and budget-related class cutbacks, there was no other choice.

I've been teaching full-time at the college for 15 years and am normally very relaxed in the classroom. The first day of class I was very nervous, and he said it showed. He was trying not to make eye contact and missed some notes on the board. By the second day of class it seemed to be easier. Then last week he looked like he was very uncomfortable and it was hard for me to ignore him. It turned out he was just really tired. I think this is harder on me than it is for him. Fortunately, he's a very good student.

Here are some things we've done so far to keep him anonymous:
We went into the room and scoped out a seat before school started--not too close and not in the back where the "more friendly" students will sit.
On his papers, he uses his first and middle name, since we have the same last name.
When I called roll on the first day, I just skimmed through names of the five or so students I already knew, so it wasn't obvious I'd never called his name.
Since he's in my office quite a bit, my office mate agreed to let him claim to be his nephew if anyone asks.

We'll see how it goes...


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