New student w/ severe ADHD (long) - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      The VENT

New student w/ severe ADHD (long)

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
TeAcHeRinFL's Avatar
TeAcHeRinFL TeAcHeRinFL is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 433
Full Member

TeAcHeRinFL
 
TeAcHeRinFL's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 433
Full Member
New student w/ severe ADHD (long)
Old 09-19-2006, 02:02 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

I don't even know where to begin. I got a new student last Friday. I was told he had ADHD and was on meds. Fine. Monday comes around and Mom can't get him in the room. During math (during the 10:00 hour), the AP took him out because he was disrupting the lesson. I had sent him back to his seat from the carpet and wouldn't sit down and started making noises. During science (1:00 hour), he was so disruptive that it was out of control. I could barely even teach my lesson without stopping to tell him to stop making so much noise. I'm talking like singing and making loud animal noises to the point where it was annoying the other students. I called the office and no one came. At 1:15, I had a read aloud. He refused to come to the carpet. Instead, he ran around in a circle with scissors and/or pencils in his hands and yelling. The teacher next door poked her head in to see what what happening and I asked her to call the office as well. The AP showed up 15 mins. later and said he had first gotten the call 5 mins. prior. Great, because now its free time and the child is content with legos at a table.

Afterschool, I spoke to his mother. To make things short, the mother spoke to the ESE specialist and said I had blamed his behavior on him. I got this email afterschool and was bewildered. In fact, I had actually told her that it was not his fault and he obviously wasn't doing this on purpose. The ESE specialist starts telling me that she knows its overwhelming, but I should be careful on how I talk to parents. Are you kidding me?

Today, I had to take him to the office because he was making loud animal noises in the hallway when the class had a bathroom break. He would not stop and laughed when I asked him to stop. He continued to make the noises in the office until the prinicipal came out and took him. This was 12:00. At 2:00, I opened my door to dismiss my students and he was sitting on the ground outside the door. My door opens into an outdoor hallway by the way.

The school doesn't have all his paperwork yet (where it is, I'd like to know!) so they can't do much more for him except give him extra time for pull out with the ESE teacher. I don't see how this child can learn in a reg. ed classroom without an aide. I'm at the end of my rope. I've had stress headaches for the past 2 days and just completely lost it after I got home today.


TeAcHeRinFL is offline   Reply With Quote

dee's Avatar
dee dee is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2005
Posts: 6,495
Senior Member

dee
 
dee's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2005
Posts: 6,495
Senior Member
Very tough.
Old 09-19-2006, 02:17 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

A student like this is ectremely challenging. I hope I can give you a bit of outside advice. From your post, it seems as though all the attention he is getting from you is when he is doing something "bad." Personally, I would develop a behavior chart in perhaps 10 minute increments and reward him with a check for each time he is doing what is expected. You don't say what grade level, but it has to be very concrete such as "sitting when techer is talking" or "doing work when the class is working" or "keeping my hands to myself." Whatever. If he has 10 blocks during the day and he gets whatever you choose (perhaps 6 blocks with a check) then he can earn a special prize whether it be something from a treasure box, extra lego time at the end of the day, whatever works.

We have had great success with the chart since the student can "see" that what he is doing is paying off. It also helps shape his behavior to more positive attention. Heap the praise!
dee is offline   Reply With Quote
Bertie
 
 
Guest

Bertie
 
 
Guest
phone call
Old 09-19-2006, 02:58 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

My wonderful supportive and wise principal would be on the phone to the previous school after one day of this, to get info and background and find out what worked. If you don't have admin support , make the call yourself, tomorrow.
  Reply With Quote
TeacherLisa1st's Avatar
TeacherLisa1st TeacherLisa1st is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 801
Senior Member

TeacherLisa1st
 
TeacherLisa1st's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 801
Senior Member

Old 09-19-2006, 04:50 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

I agree with the previous poster - call his last teacher! I have done this in the past and the old teacher (especially one from last year since it's only the beginning of the year right now) usually has a wealth of information to offer about what worked and didn't, and also helpful information about the parents. I always feel much better after I make contact with the old teacher in a situation like this!

I would also just keep calling to have him removed if he is extremely disruptive. Eventually your AP will get tired of coming to get him and will get on the ball to get that information so it can be dealt with.

In the meantime give him lots of things to keep him busy and try to have him help you with jobs - anything that will keep him moving. If he has a good hour - reward him by giving him some play doh to squeeze at his desk. This has always helped with my ADHD kids.

Lisa
TeacherLisa1st is offline   Reply With Quote
lynn's Avatar
lynn lynn is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 232
Full Member

lynn
 
lynn's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 232
Full Member
Nonrelated
Old 09-19-2006, 08:20 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

Lisa do you mind sharing what county your in, I think I might know you from a previous job? Some things I have read in your posts remind me of a coworker from about 5 years ago? Thanks.


lynn is offline   Reply With Quote
lillian lillian is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2006
Posts: 628
Senior Member

lillian
 
Joined: Jun 2006
Posts: 628
Senior Member
Adhd?
Old 09-20-2006, 12:33 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

The behavior you are describing is not typical ADHD behavior. It sounds like there is a lot more going on than ADHD. I'd be very curious what the paperwork you have not received says. My advice is to keep very clear records of his behavior, writing what behavior you are seeing, what time of day you are seeing it, and what activity was happening when you saw it. Try to do some behavior interventions, like the previous poster suggested, and keep good records of this, too. You want to make sure that your behavior interventions include rewarding him for positive behavior he already possesses, not just rewarding him for positive behavior you want to see him acquire (SPED law).

Good luck! Let us know what you find out about him, once that paperwork arrives.
lillian is offline   Reply With Quote
onlyoneandrea onlyoneandrea is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2006
Posts: 13
New Member

onlyoneandrea
 
Joined: Jun 2006
Posts: 13
New Member
This message was GOD sent!!
Old 09-21-2006, 01:40 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

TeacherinFl,
You and I are in the same boat right now. You have just described a little boy in my class down to the tee. He won't do anything that I ask him to do, the other students in my class are afraid of him, he curses out other students, and will laugh in your face if you try to discipline him. On the first day of school his mother told me that he had ADHD, and that she gives him meds 3 times a day. However, since the first day I don't think she has benn giving it to him. Myself as well as the principal have talked to his mother several times over the phone. But has anything changed.....NO. He constantly screams out answers to the test as well as hits and kicks other students. I have decided that he will not be allowed to attend any of our field trips without the company of his mother. Now, his mother is in a complete stage of denial. She thinks he doesn't need the meds. But there is a HUGE difference when he takes them and when he doesn't!
onlyoneandrea is offline   Reply With Quote
Sobczyk Sobczyk is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 3
New Member

Sobczyk
 
Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 3
New Member
Problem in Virginia
Old 09-21-2006, 02:30 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #8

Well, I am in a similar situation. I have a boy that is in my 3rd grade class is very disruptive and does not try at all with his work (especially in Reading, Spelling, and Writing). He does also bully the other kids (thank goodness he has not hit yet but he has gotten close) and makes such a fuss whenever I correct him. I have sent him the the office but the principal does nothing. Also his teacher last year really tried with him but in the process she gave into his every whim. I also have a partner teacher (we switch classes) that he does a little bit better with but she is new and she is really strict and even kinda mean to him. I have tried to be sturn but that is not working because then his bad behavior just escalates. His Mom says he has medication but that he does respond to it anymore and she also treats him very badly (she is a young, poor single parent).
My husband is a school psycholgist and he says to simply ignor it because he is simply seeking attention. But there is only so much you can ignor.
I am going to try the check chart. We will see.
Sobczyk is offline   Reply With Quote
TeAcHeRinFL's Avatar
TeAcHeRinFL TeAcHeRinFL is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 433
Full Member

TeAcHeRinFL
 
TeAcHeRinFL's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 433
Full Member
Update
Old 09-23-2006, 10:27 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #9

Well, its good to know there are others out there. His file still has not come yet and the ESE specialist does not know when it will. They can't get him an aide right now, but are going to try and test him for further handicaps. The ESE specialist agrees that there is something else there besides OHI(ADHD). The principal told me to call him whenever I am having a problem with him and he will come remove him himself. Even the ESE pull-out teacher has trouble managing him. I did get him to take the reading and spelling test yesterday in which he got a 20% and a 10% respectfully. The ESE Specialist and guidance counselor are working on interventions to use with him. I put him on a behavior comtract to work on raising his hand. It seems to be working.

The mother sat in my class for about 30 mins on Friday to see what he was doing in class. She came during the reading block and wiitnessed him disrupt others from during there work while he was at the overhead center. Andrea, you should get the mother to come in and watch him during class.
TeAcHeRinFL is offline   Reply With Quote
amccusk
 
 
Guest

amccusk
 
 
Guest
Important! College student with ADHD
Old 07-20-2007, 12:00 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #10

I am a senior at a university with severe ADHD. I experienced the same behavioral problems in elementary school, I was misunderstood. I can only say that the best way to reach an ADD/ADHD child is through positive reinforcement. The ADHD child gets bored, he/she gets distracted. They mean well, they want to behave, but they can't seem to find the will. They are socially inept. You have to motivate them to be good. Give them something to look forward to. A chart with stickers and rewards for so many stickers is good. When they see that their behavioral isn't rewarding them, they will want to try harder. Negative reinforcement only causes the behavior to worsen, creating outbursts. Try your best to ignore him when he is acting hyper or rambunctious. If you have to give him a time out, give him a book as waiting/patience and/or being quiet is not an ADHD kids virtue plus it will give you a break and the rest of the students. If you explain the classroom structure and rules to me I could give you all sorts of things that worked for me.

For the most part you have to get creative. Normal tactics do not work. Find ways to distract him from his current behavior and motivate him to redirect his behavior. When he does praise him as what he really wants his attention. My email is amccusk@hotmail.com if you want to ask questions as I would love to help.


  Reply With Quote
Lottalove's Avatar
Lottalove Lottalove is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 6,805
Senior Member

Lottalove
 
Lottalove's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 6,805
Senior Member
He sounds like a boy I had last year too--
Old 07-20-2007, 01:06 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #11

he sure gets around-- Anywhoooo, my student was diagnosed with ADHD and PDD-NOS (which is within the autism spectrum.) He was very bright and could be very loving but absolutely wore us out...I had him about 10 days by myself and documented everything (by email no less) to my principal and SpEd Director. After up to 20 emails a day, They finally provided him with a 1-1 para.

By law, they need to do that if that is what he needs. He was so bad, he rocked all my other kids back by MONTHS!! They all went back to behaviors and habits we had overcome months previous and seemed unable to answer any questions or do any work.

For more info, google PDD-NOS, Autism, or Pervasive Developmental Disorder--not otherwise specified. He was put on Strattera right before school let out so I didn't really notice a huge change before we went on summer break. I'll be interested in seeing how he acts next month (and whether Mom kept in up).
Lottalove is offline   Reply With Quote
TeAcHeRinFL's Avatar
TeAcHeRinFL TeAcHeRinFL is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 433
Full Member

TeAcHeRinFL
 
TeAcHeRinFL's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 433
Full Member
Update
Old 07-20-2007, 05:04 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #12

Well my original message was from almost a year ago but I get everything bookmarked onto my page so I'll reply. The child's dosage of Aderol was increased to 15 or 20 mg (I don't remember). He was pulled out for ESE for 1/2 hour for reading and 1/2 hour for math. He did make improvements but not enough to be promoted to the next grade level. His mother is very supportive and asked me if he'll be in my class again this year. He probably won't but its possible. For the most part as long as he was on the meds, he was one of the better behaved kids in my class. I had the class from you know where last year and this particular child was an angel compared to some of them. I ended up getting an 8 yr old ADHD/EMH (educable mentally handicapped and had petit mal seizures later in the year that gave me much more problems since he would get into fights all the time. OOOHHH memories!!!
TeAcHeRinFL is offline   Reply With Quote
MomofADHD
 
 
Guest

MomofADHD
 
 
Guest
Meds not your business
Old 08-31-2008, 05:59 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #13

I am a mom of one of the severe ADHD. I have a college education and have studied brain biology. There is no proof these meds heal they sedate and have numerous side effects and their is not enough independent research on long term effects.

I agree their is a problem but Meds are not the solution. They work for some children and that is great. But it sickens me that teachers blame parents all the time and the first question everytime is is your child on Meds? Have you tried meds? Oh I am sorry Mom of xxxx, that when you tried 50 different Meds and doses last year and your son was sick all the time they didn't work but you really just have to keep trying to find the right med/dose.

I am not trying to be combative but my child is not an experiment. I truly believe it is the healthcare industry that caused this in the first place (vaccines & overuse of chemicals in everything). They are the last place I am going for help.

Many of us have to have jobs to keep a roof over our head, and you are not the first teacher to call home or to our jobs. Our children can't control their behaviour, have no friends, and our constantly punished (field trips, parties, silent lunches, taken out of classroom).

It is not the child but the system their needs to be aides for theses kids or seperate classrooms.

My child is well behaved in small unstimulating settings, which a classroom is not. It is bright with numerous distractions on the walls and many students.

These children need reward systems and they must be short term and immediate. They need lots of opportunity to get up and walk around. I bet if you called the mom and say could you bring in a reward box strictly for your child of some of his favorite things she would gladly oblige.

Please don't always accuse the parents, because 100% of the time we are sick with worry about our child. I hate the school year. I count down the days until vacation when my son can go to camp and be a happy child.

My child is in third grade, we have dealt with this since Pre-k. My son became suicidal last year because of all the school punishments and another mom calling the police on my kid, because my son pushed hers and she didn't like how the teachers handled it.

I have to work and many days I wish I never had him because he is suffering and I can't help him. I cry many times when I think about it. I wonder if I had known not to vaccinate him to eat more omegas when I was pregnant and feed him more healthy food as a baby instead of food colored crap. To not have sprayed raid when their was a bug or carpet shampoo and then let him crawl around. I wonder why my happy and laughing baby turned into this.

During the school year it is very stressful at home because I have to constantly reprimand him for his school behaviour and homework is a nightmare. My son can learn verbally. I taught him fractions over a pizza dinner in 1st grade and he got it. He struggles with writing.

Just please stop blaming the parents because we are worn down by the situation and deal with a new teacher every year and accusations and it hurts more than you can imagine.
  Reply With Quote
lil annie's Avatar
lil annie lil annie is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 1,468
Senior Member

lil annie
 
lil annie's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 1,468
Senior Member
MomofADHD
Old 08-31-2008, 11:21 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #14

Please, please take your son to a Scottish Rite hospital for learning disabilities testing. It costs nothing but if there is more than ADHD going on, they will figure it out and tell you how to get the help your child needs. I had to do this with mine son this summer. I suspected he was dyslexic; he is not but does have issues that must be worked with.

I also encourage you to look at it from the teacher's point of view. She is responsible for making sure that all the children in her class learn and succeed. If one child is disruptive over and over to the point where she cannot teach and the other students cannot learn, what choices does she have? One person cannot be allowed to disrupt the learning of 21 others. You are right that there needs to be smaller, separate rooms or aides but most school districts don't provide those. I know mine certainly doesn't. I'm not sure what the solution is, either.
lil annie is offline   Reply With Quote
ALittleGrace
 
 
Guest

ALittleGrace
 
 
Guest
Patience and Graciousness
Old 09-02-2009, 07:45 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #15

I began to read this post because I have a child in my class who is severely ADHD, among other things, and was hoping to hear some positive suggestions to help her. Regardless of what medicine she's on (and she's been on 3 types so far just this school year just for ADHD, plus others for Anxiety...), she cannot sit still, she cannot focus, she cannot function on the level that the others function. And don't even ask what she's like when her medicine wears off. She is socially underdeveloped and often inapproproate. She picks her boogers in class, tells boys she likes them over and over again, and occassionally calls for "huggy time" when she squeezes people so hard it hurts. As a result, HER TEACHERS in previous years have continuously acted out of frustration and anger toward her, wishing her mother (whose heart is broken for the fact that her daughter has to struggle so much more than the others to learn and to fit in) would just remove her from their class so they didn't have to deal with her. Lucky you, to these teachers, that it's not your daughter.

When I signed on to be a teacher, I was well aware that most of my students would not have as easy a time as I had throughout my education. I was the good student, who made straight A's that every teacher loved because I didn't cause any trouble. Lucky me. You want help with your student that is severely ADHD? Believe in him. Actually give a sh** about him. Care enough to see what YOU can do to step up your game as the authority in YOUR classroom, rather than just seeking to remove what frustrates you. Is it hard? Yes. And you will never accomplish anything with this child if you have a bad attitude toward him. They know if you can't stand them, and they will treat you accordingly.

I tell my little ADHD student that I want her there. I made myself aware of things that she loves to have/do, and I use those things as incentives to get her to complete her assignments. I regularly give her little "jobs" to do that keep her active - erase the boards, sharpen the pencils, pass out worksheets... not punish work, stuff she loves to do... also as incentive for getting work done. I do not expect any lower performance on her part- I expect the same level of achievement as any other student. I make NO modifications to her work or to her tests. I recognize her and praise her when she does well. I make it clear to my students that it is unacceptable for any student to speak negatively about any other student in my class (which is something they will never do if you are constantly talking negative about them).

I take each one of my student's success personally and realize that EVERY student learns differently and that it is my job to teach all of them, not just the ones who learn the easy way. I make it a priority to set straight what people like the teachers who are talking bad about their students in this blog have damaged in children. When other teachers try to "warn" me about kids before they come to me, I tell them I don't want to hear it because THIS year is going to be better for them because I am their teacher.

As a result of the positive reinforcements I give her, other students notice little changes in her in the class. She does not get out of hand as much. THEY are not making of fun of her as much - many students even stick up for her now when someone says something mean. She gets more work done, and my pencils are always sharp and boards are always clean. She even got a 98% on her last science test.

So to the teachers who are really looking for positive suggestions to help you TEACH these children, I suggest trying these little things I tried... but more than that, I suggest developing an attitude of patience and graciousness, not to mention COMPASSION, for the students who struggle more than you will ever understand. (Also, I wouldn't suggest taking advice from teachers who can't spell.)

Thank you to the college student and mother who responded... you guys actually were helpful.
  Reply With Quote
pfrey71
 
 
Guest

pfrey71
 
 
Guest
Amen!
Old 11-23-2009, 06:14 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #16

Fabulous! I wish you were my son's teacher. He's got ADHD and OCD and it's difficult to see where one stops and the other starts. The kid's in third grade now, and we're still trying/adjusting/changing meds to get the ones that work the best. We had great luck with Vyvanse last year but it's not cutting it anymore. Am I crazy about the idea of having to give him meds? No way, but he's definitely better on them than off them, but the snide, holier-than-thou remarks I get from his teacher....unbelievable...and really none of her business. She made a crack to me today about him being "overmedicated". I told her two pills a day is hardly overmedicated. Then she mentioned his allergy meds. I replied- when it's hay fever season, don't we ALL take an allergy pill from time to time? Good grief. My sons spends anywhere from four to six hours after school trying to get his homework done. I asked for some homework accommodation on his 504 plan. She sent home a quippy note about how I should see how much work he gets done in class when she offers him the proper reward if he succeeds. First off, she's obviously implying that I don't know what I'm doing, and secondly, does she realize that when she's got him in school the meds are working, and by the time he gets home they've worn off? I could slap her. I fully sympathize with the Mom prior who almost wishes she hadn't had her child because of the misery that's gone on for so long. I often ask myself that question as well. Why did this happen? When will it end? I'm not an overly religious person but try to remind myself that it happened in our family because some higher being must have thought we could handle this one. Don't know about that, but I'm trying, because what other choice do I have? So Teach tells me my son can complete whatever homework he can at home within a reasonable period of time and if we have to let some of it go she won't give him zeros for the unfinished work, but then tells my son today in school that whatever he doesn't get done he'll have to stay in for lunch tomorrow and finish. Huh?

Yeah- and Teach is not the best speller either.
  Reply With Quote
ChrisC
 
 
Guest

ChrisC
 
 
Guest
Vaccines
Old 07-08-2010, 03:15 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #17

There's no correlation to suggest that vaccines cause autism. Stop listening to Jenny McCarthy.
  Reply With Quote
LMA111111111
 
 
Guest

LMA111111111
 
 
Guest
Re: patience and graciousness
Old 02-01-2012, 03:41 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #18

I'm a sub teacher and this last message before mine sounds great. It's what I try to follow as I go from classroom to classroom. Patience, compassion, positive reinforcement, sticker charts, prize boxes, jobs, games, walking in the hallway, play doh, everything and anything that will work and make a routine of it in a structured way. Please keep a positive attitude toward the child. I was the perfect student but very quiet when I was a child and I felt that the teacher's attitudes toward me was harsh bc I was "too quiet" sometimes. So, they do sense everything. Zone into what they like the best and what they hate. Focus on their interests and even make the work about their interests as much as possible.
  Reply With Quote
Sacrifice
 
 
Guest

Sacrifice
 
 
Guest

Old 06-19-2012, 06:12 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #19

We choose to live a simple life financially, so we can homeschool and give the child the environment he needs to have a successful life. Kids don't need more money, and 2 working parents. They need to be home learning fractions over pizza. You are on the right track, now take the leap into homeschooling and watch your child thrive, and you not have to stress over sending him to school. It is HARD, but anything worth having is. Your entire family will be blessed.
  Reply With Quote
greasy
 
 
Guest

greasy
 
 
Guest
I have always wanted to know.
Old 07-30-2012, 03:38 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #20

Hello, I'm in school as of right now and I've always wanted to understand the thought process with dealing with severe ADHD, since I have it. Let me just tell you, if the kid is anything like me, do not put him in detention or call his parents, or constantly attempt to scold him. It only makes it worse, trust me i went through all of this when i was constantly in and out of the principles office or in and out of detention. It never worked and i'd always be the same. The only thing i felt that worked is if i wasn't having the feeling I was getting in trouble. The only thing that really worked is if i was put in a separate room. As long as i was out of trouble and i knew that i could enter that classroom again, with a fresh mind. It was really hard for me to understand that i didn't choose to be that way. It seems like a lot of you here are trying to treat it like he had a choice in all this.
  Reply With Quote
Akieautumn
 
 
Guest

Akieautumn
 
 
Guest
ADHD, Disipline, Point Sheet, And The Effects
Old 08-28-2012, 04:38 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #21

I have ADHD and Dyscalculia (Math Disability) and was assigned a behaivor chart but really it made me feel worse because the teachers were also real strict with me and I switch classes and the only place I felt comfortable was at lunch and recess the places where I did not need all those points. And I also never liked getting the detentions, going to the Special Education teacher, Getting write-ups, or going to the principals office or getting sent home, It never worked because I never wanted to feel like I was unwanted in the class or get in trouble for every little thing all because some teachers thought it was "Disrupting the class." But when another kid did that behaivior they got a lighter case or was told to stop it, Which never made me feel good, I had to answer a math question out loud I couldn't and she wrote on the sheet that I did not participate and told me I was being defiant but two days later she tells the class "If you don't feel confident to tell your answer make sure you have one thought up in your head". Which made me feel unwanted. In the last three years weren't the best for me there were big problems not with behaivior but mainly how I was bullied or felt depressed, Which developed other problems, Depression. All I could think about was the issues dealt with in school, I tried to tell my parents but they didn't do much and I felt sick to my stomach everyday there would be an issue even dropping my pencil one time. I knew that the other kids got away with their behaivior even when a girl was drinking in class and another shouting out the window during a lesson, All I have to do is laugh and boom it could be a bad effect for the whole day.
  Reply With Quote
Akieautumn
 
 
Guest

Akieautumn
 
 
Guest
Ocd
Old 08-28-2012, 05:08 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #22

I forgot to add OCD it's pretty difficult because I want everything to feel just right in class and if it is not I would do 15 pages till it feels right and the teachers thought I did absolutly nothing in class.
  Reply With Quote
Oldschooltchr
 
 
Guest

Oldschooltchr
 
 
Guest
ADHD Issues
Old 10-22-2013, 10:29 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #23

As a teacher, I get so fed up and frustrated with parents who feel that we should cater to the few. I am really sorry your child has ADHD. I really am!!! I will do everything in my power to make school a positive experience; however, there are some behaviors that are unfair to both the teacher and the students who are in the classroom to learn. ( No wonder our education system has so many problems when we are always running around trying to serve the minority. )
Currently, I have a classroom of 30 third graders. My four students displaying signs of ADHD and two other students with an official diagnosis take all of my time and energy. I have 15 of my 30 students who are NOT on grade level for reading. I have parent volunteers, community volunteers..etc. These people are wonderful, and I adore them and appreciate their sacrifice of time for my students behalf.
I do many positive rewards, consequences etc....plus in years past I have gotten all of my students on grade level, so I am not uncaring or unfeeling...just exhausted from the massive amounts of paperwork. ( I do have a life outside of class, and return home to my own children at 6 or 7pm just like many of you in the private sector. So I am putting in the time.)
I did not sign up to be a babysitter of the few students who are unable and or unwilling to learn like the majority. This is a very unrealistic expectation. I have tested and retested. Done intervention after intervention, put as many students as I could in the front etc. I have done sticker charts, tickets, and a class store. What does this really teach our students? That misbehavior pays....
Parents can place the blame at the teachers feet, say they are uncaring, not understanding etc. However, your child's education and the help they require is entirely up to you! I am a parent of many children myself, and am fully aware that if my child doesn't get something in school it is up to me to help them succeed. A teacher can deliver the information necessary to perform well in school, but it us up to the parent to ensure that this will work for your child. Sometimes we have to make sacrifices as a parent for the benefit of our children. If your child struggles, be the hero who sacrifices a little time and money to tutor your child one on one or get someone who can. Don't rely on your child's classroom teacher to be a hero...when you need to be.
  Reply With Quote
Lakeside's Avatar
Lakeside Lakeside is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Posts: 5,122
Senior Member

Lakeside
 
Lakeside's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Posts: 5,122
Senior Member

Old 10-23-2013, 04:20 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #24

Wow, I clicked on this and didn't realize at first that it was a thread that had gone on for quite some time. The thing I noticed, though, is that everyone seems to want the same thing - a positive outcome for all the children, but somehow feel they are on different sides.

A parent said her child works better in a small, un-classroom-like setting, but I had always thought that parents were behind the push to have students mainstreamed into regular classrooms. Is this really all some great case of miscommunication? Are schools doing exactly what parents don't want because they think it's what parents do want?

Are we denying all our students the best learning environment for them simply because we feel socially guilty admitting that they aren't all exactly the same? If so, how do you feel about sorting students by learning style, where we could emphasize the strengths of each kind of learner instead?
Lakeside is offline   Reply With Quote
MyADHDboy
 
 
Guest

MyADHDboy
 
 
Guest
You said it Mama!!
Old 08-17-2017, 06:44 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #25

I too am a mother of a third grader with severe ADHD. MomofADHD, you took the words right out of my mouth.

My beautiful, loving, kind and generous boy hates going to school but THRIVES on learning new things. He craves input, knowledge, music, math, science and the study of animals and habitats. How are working parents supposed to educated our children if we can't count on the schools to step up to the needs of ALL of the children? Who do I turn to to teach my son when I am not in a position to home school him? And for that matter, why should I have to home school him? In public school he had an aide who came in during reading and math to help him "focus". Those were the only two subjects he actually "passed". He had better penmanship when he was 3 and I was a stay at home mom!! Now he can hardly write his name let alone spell. And when he asked his teacher for help to complete an assignment that the other students were able to complete during the allotted time, she told him that she would help him with it after class, but when he went back after class she told him she didn't have time. THREE TIMES!!! It was an assignment to write a story for your parents, so he never got to do it and didn't want our help to compete it. And that is just ONE EXAMPLE.

This year we moved our son into a private school, believing that the smaller classroom would provide a less stimulating environment; quieter, fewer distractions, less noise, more 1:1 time. We are finding that even here the teacher is feeling "overwhelmed" by his behavior, and he is actually maintaining his seat!! He's not running around anymore. He's quietly humming to himself, he's tapping his pencil, he's bouncing his feet. He's "asking to many questions and wanting to tell stories".

I'm literally at my whits end. How do I give my beautiful boy the education he deserves, desires, craves even? Like my son always says, "Its just not fair mama." And field trips..... The last field trip he flat out told me he didn't want to go because it wouldn't be fun because the teachers would just yell at him the whole time. Guess who took the day off work and took her kid on a field trip of our own?
  Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
The VENT
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 07:29 PM.

Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net