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chelseeuh chelseeuh is offline
 
Joined: Dec 2007
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chelseeuh
 
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 120
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Behavior Interventions for Noises/Talking 1st Grade
Old 12-16-2018, 07:51 AM
 
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I have a parent conference tomorrow to update a family on their son's impulsive behaviors, namely "out of seat" and excessive talking and noise making during whole group lessons. He will make these noises even when he is seated directly next to me on the carpet. A visual reminder gets him to stop for 30 seconds to a minute at most.

I want to go with a couple of different ideas to help with the talking/noise-making. The parent has also "requested that an administrator be present" so that's awesome.

The boy barely turned 6 days before school started this year, so very young. Halfway through the year and it is standing out much more because most of the other students have developed more independence.

Any tips appreciated!!


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Haley23 Haley23 is offline
 
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Haley23
 
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Old 12-16-2018, 02:52 PM
 
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IME this is difficult to deal with because most students who are constantly making noise have ADHD and can't control it/don't even know that they are making the noises.

Have you tried some sort of point sheet or behavior chart where he earns points for being quiet? Just off the top of my head, maybe have 3-5 sticks/cubes/other objects that he starts each lesson with. If you have to remind him about the noise, take one away. You can have these up at the front of the room with you and just make sure he knows what they're for (so he's not playing with them if they're at his desk).

If he still has at least one left at the end of the lesson, he earns his points for that lesson. Have him choose appropriate rewards that he wants to work towards. You may want to have a "morning reward" and an "afternoon reward" so he still feels like he has something to work for even if he blows it in the morning.

You can set it up however works for you, but the other benefit of doing a point sheet is that it's an easy way to have daily communication with parents (you can just send it home), and if you need to keep documentation/data, you'll have it.

This could also help you determine if this is a "can't do" vs. "won't do" skill for this kid. If he really wants the reward yet never earns the points, this would point more to this being something out of his control. You could use that as evidence to suggest parents check with their pediatrician , if you're allowed to give that sort of advice at your school. In my current school we can.
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chelseeuh chelseeuh is offline
 
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chelseeuh
 
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Great Ideas
Old 12-16-2018, 04:14 PM
 
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Thank you for taking the time to post such a great reply. Your response brought to mind some things I have tried in the past and framed them in a different way that may be helpful for this student. I appreciate that!
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