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Principal problems
Old 06-28-2016, 07:43 PM
 
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Basically, I've been teaching for 10 years as a second career. I love teaching. I've had 3 prior principals who all got to observe and evaluate me and have had no issues. This year we got a principal from another building because our Sup didn't like our last principal of 6 years. (Politics)

Basially, I could go on to write a novel but I'm just wondering, aren't inferencing and drawing conclusions pretty closely related? Because my principal said she was TOTALLY confused about my lesson and the two are totally different. As for her being confused, she made 3 of us cram an observation in April, after the deadline, because she had missed us. Then she made the three of us show her two different lessons in one day.

I would be here all night writing about this year with her and I know I'm not really explaining much, but I was a bit flabbergasted when she said that and wanted to laugh at her. Not sure why exactly she doesn't like me, other than I'm pretty passionate about our kids and not afraid to speak up when I feel something isn't right, even at district wide meetings.

After the post-observation, I went back to my room and wrote down all the fabrications she'd said. Sorry if this is rambling, but I still feel a lot of pent up anxiety about the woman and school got out right be fore Memorial Day. Lord, help me find some peace!!!!


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Old 06-28-2016, 08:41 PM
 
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Yes, of course inferences and drawing conclusions are very closely related. Many people use them interchangeably, although there are subtle differences I'm sure someone will come and explain, but they are most definitely related.

I would guess that the fact that you are not afraid to speak up at meetings has a LOT to do with her attitude. When I first started teaching I got non-renewed for this. I assumed that everyone understood that I was trying to advocate for the kids when I spoke up, and had no idea that some admins take great offense to this. I do believe that there are some principals want all teachers to stay quiet and agree with everything they and the district does, and if any teacher doesn't toe that line and keep their mouth shut, they'll have a target on their backs.

Beware of this one. Yes, I do believe that she doesn't like you. Be careful, and I'd suggest to stay out of her way and be careful of what you say in meetings. A principal who doesn't like you can really make your life difficult.
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Slow down next year.
Old 06-28-2016, 09:35 PM
 
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I think you have the correct perception of your new P. She doesn't seem to like you. Perhaps she feels she's been sent to our school to "clean up" the rebellious teachers. She may hope to criticize every little thing you do in hopes that you'll tone down your rhetoric.
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Not sure why exactly she doesn't like me, other than I'm pretty passionate about our kids and not afraid to speak up when I feel something isn't right, even at district wide meetings.
No administrator likes to have a staff member that criticizes procedures or decisions made a district wide meetings. You have the right to speak up, but get ready to feel the displeasure of your P. There is a reason that many teachers sit quietly when directives are given. They are not in a position to make the final decisions.

Teachers expect their students to comply with decisions they make. School administrators feel the same way. Don't get in a power struggle that you can't possibly win.
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Old 06-29-2016, 02:14 AM
 
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Inferences and conclusions are not the same. Unfortunately, they are often taught as very similar things because part of the process is the same. Both require thinking about what you know or read.

There is a huge push to teach students to draw conclusions based on inferences rather than just facts which is one reason why I think so many people see them as similar. Also, since you can use some facts to help infer other information it is not a conclusion, just more information.

The way I think of it is the conclusion is the end decision based on facts and/or inferences. Inferences are bits of information that is factual or not. Some see those bits of information as mini-conclusions and often call them conclusions which is why the area gets so intertwined.

I acknowledge that many do teach inference as being the same as drawing conclusions even though they really aren't the same thing.

Sorry things didn't go well.
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make the adjustments or follow the directives
Old 06-29-2016, 03:01 AM
 
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So with any change in management, the underlings only got a couple of choices and they're not much. Either you make the adjustments or follow the directives. They're pretty much one and the same. As an adage they say in in Korea (or is that in Japan?), the nail that sticks out is the one that gets hammered in (I don't know if that makes any sense to you or if it translates well). I would listen to the principal and try the new ideas and report your findings. I know you don't want to turn into a "yes" man. Somehow, you have to express and it doesn't have to be in words and I don't know if that's going to win her over. I know that you are getting paid not to be a yes man because you got something to contribute. Just put their ideas first before yours and go from there. That is all.



Last edited by Mikhail; 06-29-2016 at 05:00 AM.. Reason: correction
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Strange principals
Old 06-29-2016, 04:27 AM
 
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If your district is like ours, hiring restrictive principals who have little regard for what children really need has become the new norm. I do believe they (admin) are under lots of pressure in terms of test scores, and to get there, everyone doing the same thing and "moving in the same direction," as we are told. Once you speak up (and I do in my building) they get a bit nervous -- at least this new breed of principals we keep hiring here. To me, they seem better suited for a business career, but our district, like many others, is looking to a "business model." It's frustrating.

I have found that if I can lay low for a bit, our principal turns her unwanted attentions to others. Lousy, though. I feel for you. Just remember to document everything (within reason), so you can show how you are complying with certain standards of practice. She really sounds nutty!!!
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Old 06-29-2016, 04:42 AM
 
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You're right. According to Ellin Keene, my reading comprehension goddess, drawing conclusions is one way we infer.

Sometimes it is just easiest to smile and nod. Good luck.
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Old 06-29-2016, 06:07 AM
 
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If I recall draw conclusions means to pull your justification or statement from what you read and inferring is a conclusion made from both background experience and from what you read.

The prince can make your life difficult for your entire career;even after you leave or she leaves. I would not make any waves at this point . She won't be there forever. If you have a chance to write a rebuttal or response to your observation I would write something along the lines of "I will continue to refine my teaching practices and strive to make concepts clear to the students"..... make it short and non judgemental regarding her evaluation. Her actions can have lasting effects on your career.
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Principal
Old 06-29-2016, 06:23 AM
 
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Quote:
Teachers expect their students to comply with decisions they make. School administrators feel the same way. Don't get in a power struggle that you can't possibly win.
That's my thoughts exactly.

I've worked under fantastic principals and awful ones. In all cases, I didn't always agree with them. We can't control what others feel or do, and we need to remember respect for authority whether we agree with our administration or not. Butting heads with them is not going to get our way, and it can come back to bite us if we're not careful. Just listen in meetings rather than giving your 2 cents. Yes, they'll put a target on your back to prove a point that they're the one in charge. Lie low and just smile and nod - then go back to your classroom and do the best you can. If you absolutely feel like what you have to say could make a difference, then ask to meet with her privately (when the meeting is over) and talk to her later about it. Never call her out on something in front of the whole group.

I'm sorry you had a rough time with it. That's never fun and can really put a damper on your classroom atmosphere. It sounds to me like your P was stressed from having to do observations at the last minute (her fault, but doesn't matter), so part of her reactions could've just been based on that.
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Old 06-29-2016, 06:35 AM
 
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So sorry, Mrs. Bee....but don't let this principal ruin your summer. As others have said, you're right....for reasons unknown, she doesn't like you....NOW. But if you make waves, it will just make it worse. So stop trying to right every wrong and especially venting your concerns at district meetings. If you value your job and want to be there for the kids....you have to put up with some nonsense. So try your best to just smile and nod and say Yes, m'am....and realize she's not going to change.


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For clarification
Old 06-29-2016, 07:23 AM
 
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Inferences and conclusions give you a powerful tool for understanding people and the decisions they make. An inference is an assumed fact, based on information you have at your disposal. A drawn conclusion is an assumption developed as a next logical step for the given information. You can employ inferences and conclusions together to increase the accuracy of your conclusions and learn to better understand the people around you.

Think of inference as what can be assumed and drawing conclusion as what happened next.

Are you sure that your P doesn't like you, or is she covering up for her inadequacies? She obviously is having issues getting everything done in a timely manner. Regardless, don't stir the pot. In today's teaching world, it seems as if teachers are always on the firing line. Smile, move on from this, and teach your students. Do not waste any more time on your P. She will be here today, maybe gone tomorrow, and, hopefully, will not do too much harm to the staff and students.

Enjoy your break!
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Thanks...
Old 08-02-2016, 07:58 PM
 
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Thanks for all the support! And.... truthfully I appreciate the help on inferences and drawing conclusions.

I'm going to head into this school year focusing on just my job. Thank God I like my team!
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