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Remote live instruction Expectations
Old 06-13-2020, 06:18 AM
 
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How much live teaching were you expected to do each day? Our district says parents are complaining about the lack of seeing teachers live each day. As a response, my district now wants teachers to do live morning meetings, for 30 minutes every day at the same time, live lessons for each subject area and have live small group enrichment and support groups. This doesn't include specials classes such as music, art and PE and it doesn't include special education supports for students that need them.

I'm frustrated that there is no consideration for our personal daily lives at home with our own children, spouses working etc. What are your district expectations? Am I overreacting? Thanks in advance!


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Old 06-13-2020, 06:23 AM
 
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We were not required to do anything live. We were encouraged to prepped video lessons and hold weekly live meetings.

I had such difficulty getting my students all in one place at the same time. So I held one live meeting a week. But I was available to meet with students individually on video when needed.

Who knows what the requirements will be come August. Superintendent says all children will be in their seats. No distance learning. Heís crazy.
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Old 06-13-2020, 06:37 AM
 
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I think it depends on what level you are teaching. I am Upper Elementary and we were not required to do any live or video teaching. Some people did. I held a live morning meeting two to three times a week for about 30 minutes. I never had more than half my class at attend at any one time. Some of my kids never came. I offered hour-long live help sessions twice a week that kids could pop into if they needed help on work and NO ONE ever came, even with constant nagging reminders that they were available!

I also reached out to several children/parents to video help occasionally, and some would take me up on it and some wouldn't.

Middle School and High School were expected to do a lot more live classes that children needed to attend. But even after the first week or two that was reduced greatly because it was just too much with several siblings in one family sharing devices. I think they switched to an every-other-day format for live classes, rather than every day for each class.

We used pre-made videos to help teach some concepts (Zearn, Khan, YouTube, etc) However I felt a lot of what we were doing was assigning work rather than really teaching. But we were expected to continue with as much of the curriculum as we could, which we did.

If we have to do this in the fall it's probably going to have to look a lot different. And there has to be a lot more accountability for the students too, as I have some who did very little.
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Old 06-13-2020, 06:58 AM
 
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We were not allowed to do live instruction at our elementary level. Middle School and high school were allowed a little more, but at the elementary, we weren't allowed to do any. We did pre-recorded videos. We also did do Google Meets with our kids, but that was more to provide additional help, answer questions, build community, etc. We had to record them and post them for anyone who couldn't make them, either.
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Old 06-13-2020, 08:01 AM
 
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We were expected to be live a lot. Morning meeting, whole class instruction, and afternoon small groups/individual check-ins. It was a lot. But...parents pay a lot in tuition at our school so it was the expectation that instruction continued as if we were on campus.


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Old 06-13-2020, 09:04 AM
 
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I did once a week live. In two months, I saw maybe 6 of my 85 kids.
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Old 06-13-2020, 09:08 AM
 
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I did two live zoom meetings a week and posted review work each day on Google classroom. I dedicated a portion of the zoom meetings to share my screen and show the students what was new in Google classroom. I never got more than 7 students per meeting. I also hosted 2 live zoom meetings for parents to show them what their children were seeing in Google classroom and some expectations like that. Since it was all supposed to be review, and I didn't have a high rate of participation, I didn't do much live teaching; I mainly let the kids visit with each other and moderated that social time.
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live instruction
Old 06-13-2020, 09:09 AM
 
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Will all grades be live at the same time? What about families that don't have multiple computers, tablets, phones? In some areas the internet service service might not support multiple live streaming.


What will be the expectation for the students who don't log on?



Bless the teachers!!!
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Old 06-13-2020, 09:26 AM
 
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I taught live twice a week, and each of those days I met with 4 small groups. I had a whole class meeting Friday’s. I bet our expectation for live teaching will increase though next year which would make sense, since its new content. I also had office hours on the days I wasn’t live teaching.

Most of my students showed up each time, barring two (out of 25). For new content, I made math videos almost daily.
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Old 06-13-2020, 10:40 AM
 
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Sorry to say this but with all of that 'live time' parents will soon be complaining again about the increased expectations. Depending on what age/grade level you are teaching, being live multiple times a day puts a lot of responsibility on parents to have their kids available and set up for live classes. Older kids can most likely set up the computer by themselves, but parents will still need to be sure the home environment is scheduled for them to be 'in class' multiple times a day. Thinking back to when my 3 kids were younger and still in school, I would not have wanted multiple live school events streaming into my home all day long.

My district did not allow us to do live or recorded lessons because not all students had access to the technology. I was more than OK with that.


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Live teaching
Old 06-13-2020, 11:19 AM
 
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Teachers have lives: full time working spouses , children who was in school, and children who are young and need a lot of attention.

My question:
How does your district expect all students to come to these lives meetings? Are they providing devices and hot spots or boosters for families with multiple children? Or parents who are working online at the same time?

That is just ridiculous and you should fight it. Who gets access to your live teaching? Children of privilege or wealthy families. Wrong wrong wrong
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Old 06-13-2020, 12:10 PM
 
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At my school we didn't have any requirements for live teaching. I expect that will change if we go remote again. What we did this time (Google chats for kids who needed it and assignments in Google Classroom) did not work.

However, I do think it is fair for a district to ask teachers to do some live teaching. In my district we still got our full salary. I know it would be hard to do live teaching with young kids at home, but if they are paying my full salary, I don't think it's an unreasonable expectation.

Last edited by tyrex; 06-14-2020 at 10:54 AM.. Reason: We did Google chats, not Google meets
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Live meetings
Old 06-13-2020, 12:16 PM
 
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We were encouraged to do at least one zoom meeting each week. We had to coordinate schedules with all teachers in the school so sibling meetings did not overlap. I did two each week. Never saw more than 75% of my class at one time. I averaged about 60% participation at our meetings. I didnít really teach at these meetings, reviewed some concepts and answered questions along with some games/sorta fun stuff. We did prerecorded videos to demonstrate concepts each week.

If we need to continue with this type of model in the fall, I think we would need to do more frequent meetings and really stress that everything is required. We have the devices for students, just need support for internet access for some families.
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Old 06-13-2020, 02:38 PM
 
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In my district online learning only occurred 4 days per week and the 5th was a teacher plan day. On the online learning days, a daily 30 minute community circle meeting was required (if you're not a classroom teacher, you had to choose one to go to each day) as well as one "office hour" where you had an open zoom link that students and parents could pop into with questions. Not one person ever attended mine, and most of my coworkers had the same experience.

On my town's FB page there were a whole lot of complaints from parents that the teachers "weren't really teaching." They're definitely wanting more live lessons. I expect that if we were to continue full time online learning in the fall (at this point, I don't see that happening, but who really knows) there will be more expectations for having it look more like "regular school." Not necessarily all day long, but I think there will be way more synchronous teaching required. At the beginning of all of this people really thought it was temporary. There were a big feeling of "we're all in this together" and it's okay for teachers and students alike to just do the best they can. I don't see those warm and fuzzy feelings continuing at all. People will not care what it looks like for teachers and students will be expected to make growth consistent with "regular school."
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Old 06-13-2020, 02:47 PM
 
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We weren't required to do a certain number of video meetings. Our last day of school was June 10.

I had a combo, so I did Online meetings with each grade level, Monday through Thursday. I met with both grades together on Friday.

One of the challenges we ran into in our area is that some families had more than one child who couldn't handle the tech without help. Lucky for me, i teach upper elementary, so the kids were more autonomous.

Our district asked us to provide enough activities for a certain amount of time by grade level.

Last edited by Singvogel; 06-13-2020 at 04:13 PM..
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Old 06-13-2020, 03:18 PM
 
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We were asked for our kids to have live access to us at least 3x/week. That could be whole group, small group, or individual. Some parents thought it was too much, some not enough.


My question is for families and kids who are sharing devices, how could they all be on their morning meeting at the same time? That's not going to work.
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Old 06-13-2020, 03:33 PM
 
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We didnít have to do live classes, but nearly everyone did. As we got further into the term, people got more comfortable with the technology and did more things live. I donít think expecting teachers to teach during the time theyíre being paid to teach is unreasonable.
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Old 06-13-2020, 11:35 PM
 
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An hour daily for the whole class.
Plus, additional small group sessions, at our discretion, or individual conferences as requested.
That was ok and reasonable imo. However, the never ending faculty and PLC meetings (3x weekly, anywhere from 1-2 hours each) were excessive, imo.
ETA: although there were some snafus, the district provided chromebooks and Wi-Fi for those that requested it. Not all my students participated each day, but most did attend the majority of the sessions.
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Old 06-14-2020, 01:17 AM
 
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I did live teaching three hours a day by choice- not requirement. I do think that unless a teacher is having a big family or health issue, that live teaching is possible and should be done. I know itís hard but I think itís the best we can offer students right now.
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Old 06-14-2020, 02:17 AM
 
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Special ed teachers were required to teach live 2x a week per class they taught prior to school closing. On average I taught 8 live classes and then 3-4 additional 1:1 live meets. Then we needed to provide daily independent practice work, via Google Classroom.

General ed teachers were not required to teach live classes but had to provide asynchronous lessons , and daily office hours for quick communication. However, many gen ed teachers began to offer live office hours.

We end June 18th.
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Old 06-14-2020, 04:09 AM
 
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I personally did not schedule any live meets. I posted enrichment activities in Google Classrooms and prepared paper packets for all students initially and then a second round to paper packets for K-2 students (who did not have chromebooks at that time- all have them now).

Everyone in the Special Area department offered to attend regularly scheduled Zoom meetings and to provide lessons there for all grade levels. We heard from parents that kids were spending too much time in front of a screen and families were overwhelmed.

Our expectation was to offer a sufficient number of live meetings to provide connections for students. Learning was definitely secondary to social- emotional well being.
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Old 06-14-2020, 09:13 AM
 
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We were not allowed to do any live instruction. The district felt it was unfair to students without internet access. We were also strongly discouraged from using prerecorded instruction. If we included a video clip with our lessons, we were required to provide a written transcript, which is absolutely ridiculous.
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Old 06-14-2020, 09:18 AM
 
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we had it pretty darn easy!

subject supervisors and coordinating teachers organized curriculum--i think at each grade level, a variety of teachers were asked to contribute lessons for one week---i was asked, any way to create 2 math lessons, so i assume...

all teachers were expected to have 2 hours of "office hours"--in some way--be available by phone, email, online presence...and to get that information to parents. we did not grade any of the work, but gave feedback if asked. students were allowed to redo work from 3rd quarter and 2nd semester (as always) was an average of 3rd and 4th--so basically 3rd quarter, unless a kid redid work. (our district policy is to allow redo's within a quarter, so this was a small change.)

my teaching partner and i decided to jump into Google Meets with no training and only one practice within a staff meeting.

we ran a one-hour Meet with any kiddos that showed up (the most i ever had was 15 out of 21, the least was 7--typical was 10). i did Morning Meeting, sharted any announcements, went over the work for the day--reviewing or teaching any difficult math concepts, and then we played a game. i stayed in the Meet for the next hour for any questions. i only had 2 come back in for "help"--and one was a parent! the work was not required and was all supposed to be review---there were 2 math concepts we hadn't got to yet, so i had to teach those!
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Old 06-14-2020, 09:55 AM
 
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Weíre working 6-7 hours a day. Live teaching all day long. My grandsons in NY had one taped message per day for an hour. Next year, they plan no specials such as gym or art or library and kids need to eat in the classroom with their teacher. My best buddy still teaching is taking the year off. Said that is ridiculous!
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Old 06-14-2020, 10:46 AM
 
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I have a feeling that's where we are going. My question is, how will teachers be provided with planning time if there are no specials? Also, it is in our contract to get a duty free lunch. The only way I can see this happening is if they either have special area teachers float to the classrooms, or end school earlier for kids while teachers stay and use that as planning time.
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Old 06-14-2020, 11:33 AM
 
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What will the special teachers be doing?
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Old 06-14-2020, 11:39 AM
 
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Can you explain a bit more what you did for an hour daily? What did an actual daily schedule look like?
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Old 06-14-2020, 11:47 AM
 
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Grade 2. We used a combo of powerpoints, flipcharts, short videos to introduce a skill, talk about it, have kids work out problems or write responses and hold up for teacher to look over and share orally. Followed the skills in the curriculum. Our reading anthology has an online component anyway, so we could project the stories and read together. I found math to be harder to teach online, as the kids did not have access to manipulatives with them
It took a lot of time to prep, I found I had to basically write out a script for myself to go along with each slide, etc. Fortunately, I have a great team, and we split up the work and shared with each other.
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Old 06-14-2020, 04:15 PM
 
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Will be divided among the classrooms to help...
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Old 06-15-2020, 05:45 PM
 
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We were warned at first against using Zoom. Plus, I heard some horror stories about teachers getting recorded and zoombombed so I decided not to use it. I had a few coworkers who met once a week with her classes. She invited me to join once since we have most of the same students and NO ONE KID showed up.

For the basic lessons, we used stuff that could be done without any videos or programs. Basically, they got an email with everything in it. I did add some "extras", but I couldn't grade those.

Since my district didn't even have enough working computers for everyone, it was a mess. Parents without Internet were told to park in the school's parking lot. There were some kids we never heard from and some who refused to do anything.

For NEXT year, we heard the exact same thing that "parents were disappointed in the lack of student interaction with teachers." Okay, well, I spent half my time trying to coordinate with my grade level teachers and the other half chasing down MIA kids. They can force us to Zoom, but I have a feeling like attendance would be low. We have students who are in shelters, homeless, unsupervised, have no Internet, and others who have no support. Yet, I guess the only parents who did the surveys were the ones who wanted MORE work when the other half did almost nothing.

I don't know how you would do all that with your own family there. I don't think you are overreacting at all. There has to be a compromise.
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Old 06-17-2020, 06:49 AM
 
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About three quarters of the way through lockdown we were told to zoom every day by the superintendent. Nobody gets a day off from learning. Yup. I teach multiple classes so I was zooming every day with each class and making videos in addition to live teaching. Half of the kids were on other devices while I was teaching, having conversations with other people in their house, wandering around the house, eating, etc. They didn't have their materials. I had days where no one showed up for class. It was a complete waste of time. This happened at the exact time that my colleagues and I were being contacted by parents saying it was all too much. Multiple parents said enough. We had to contact parents saying your child isn't doing his or her work/showing up for class. and parents didn't care. I was over it in April. I did what I was told and never had more than a handful of students in each class.
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Old 06-17-2020, 07:10 AM
 
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We had no requirements but teachers had to log contact with each student twice a week. It would be by phone, classroom, or a live meet. We also were not giving any grades... We can't do that long term next year, so hopefully we don't go that route.

We had teachers all over the map on how they did things. Some worked hard for the whole day (and often into the evening) with whole group meets, and then small group or even individual meets with their students, and some posted things online once a week and had a weekly or biweekly google meet to discuss them. Some of those teachers I feel just had the meets so kids could see each other. There definitely has to be some guidelines and students have to be held accountable for grades.
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