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Does anyone ever experience these horrible behaviors?

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Does anyone ever experience these horrible behaviors?
Old 04-29-2019, 08:18 PM
 
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I just really had to come on here and vent to see if anyone has had to deal with anything similar and if anyone has any tips.

Behavior is just out of control and it seems like kids don't care no matter the age.
-Kinder kids who run off, mouth off, and do not fear consequences.
-second graders are cursing at lunch, saying negative things about another students skin color, and talking about fighting other students.
-I have been on bus duty for the past couple of months and a female student tells teachers that she can do whatever she pleases, don't "try her", and after conferences with mom, is right back doing the same thing.
-Fifth grade student has flipped of a monitor, stuck gum in another students hair, intentionally curses in front of teaches.

I don't remember kids acting like that when I was their age, but then again I could have been blind to it.

The school I am at is in a rougher area of town and some parents are absent from these kids lives, but even though we try with positive reinforcement, it doesn't seem to matter.

Not sure what to do, but it has been driving me crazy and I am just counting down the says. 18 to go!!


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Out of control
Old 04-29-2019, 09:58 PM
 
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The school I am at is in a rougher area of town and some parents are absent from these kids lives
I'd say that's the root of the problem, in a lot of cases

I've definitely seen most of those things (or some form of them). Dealing with them is rough. Currently I have a pretty great kinder class. Two who are defiant, but we're 1/4 of the way through the school year here and their behaviour is definitely improving. It's been a couple years since I've had a really tough group.

I feel like it's a bit tricky to give tips because there are so many different ages and behaviours mentioned, and I'm not sure what your context is. Are you a class teacher? A sub? A specialist?

I believe in positive reinforcement, along with relationship building and logical, consistent consequences. If I heard one of my students ran away from another teacher during recess, I'd be having them write a little apology note and if it happened again, they'd be having to stay close to the classroom for the next few recesses, until I could trust them respond well to other teachers. (I don't like taking recess, but we have a sandpit and small play area right outside my room that they would have to stick to. They hate that as most of them prefer to play with the bigger kids on the oval)

If one of the kids was being rude/defiant when I was on bus duty, I would follow up with their classroom teacher. I think when you don't have a relationship with a kid, it's harder to know what is an appropriate consequence. I'd also want to know if it was one of my students. I'm a big believer in backing up other teachers.

A few of the things you mentioned, on the other hand, are straight up bullying. Those things definitely need to be reported to higher ups. The gum incident is awful

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I don't remember kids acting like that when I was their age, but then again I could have been blind to it.
I don't remember it either! My community was pretty small and tight-knit, though, and I don't remember any poverty.
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Old 04-30-2019, 10:23 AM
 
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Sick and tired of this poor behavior being blamed on: "they are poor. They have it rough! The teacher doesn't have a relationship with the student" type of comment.

None of these things are an excuse to be disrespectful and misbehave. I've had elite students who have everything they need and still misbehave.

Many people made it through despite unspeakable adversities. It never stop them from succeeding.

Even my 504 plan/Sped kids when they really want something, they are unstoppable. I had a Sped kid one time. Let's call him, Jim. One of Jim difficulties was following directions. Jim never ever had a problem following the 100 of directions/instructions from the football coach. Jim never ever had a problem memorizing all the plays and writing them down. Jim was the football superstar and remembering anything at all in class. Jim also memorized all the rules to drive a car but he couldn't be bother with a school activity. Nope, it had to many instructions for him to handle.

If there is one thing a student from a "rough or poor area" needs is lots and lots of discipline and structure. When you really love someone, you give them just that. Let the psychologist and therapist give them the emotional attention they are not receiving at home.

Again, what all students need is discipline and structure. No, there lack of respect and horrible misbehavior should not be blame on social status.
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Old 04-30-2019, 05:53 PM
 
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These types of behaviors have been around for awhile. I started teaching 20 years ago and dealt with a lot of these behaviors. I taught in a low income school and many kids in our building had very little parental support. It doesnít excuse the behavior but it does explain it. I found that I couldnít just tell kids to walk in the hall. I had to say donít run. Their lives were so full of negative feedback that they didnít understand the positive. My class rules had a do and donít list. Do raise your hand. Donít shout out. They got that. Then I did a daily reward system. I kept a checklist and if they moved past a certain point they lost the ten minutes of free time at the end of the day. They lost the free time before they lost recess. It was funny how hard kids would work for free time but didnít give a flip about recess. Good luck with the rest of the year. Summer will be here soon.
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Old 04-30-2019, 09:33 PM
 
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Quote:
If there is one thing a student from a "rough or poor area" needs is lots and lots of discipline and structure. When you really love someone, you give them just that. Let the psychologist and therapist give them the emotional attention they are not receiving at home.
I 100% agree with the first part of this. Structure, saying no, and consistent consequences are all important parts of my teaching. I'm not sure about that second bit though. None of my students are seeing a psych or therapist on a regular basis, and even if they were, I think they need that positive emotional input every day. And, it makes my job so much easier when I have taken the time to build a good relationship with my students.

Having said that, I do agree that we should not be handing students excuses for poor behaviour. I am totally with you on keeping expectations high.


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