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Opinions?
Old 10-07-2019, 03:06 PM
 
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What do you all think?


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Never Had a Problem
Old 10-07-2019, 03:59 PM
 
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I don't agree. I think homework builds responsibility/using time wisely, and is a better use of time than TV and video games...although I do think kids should have time after school for free play and family board game nights.

I never had a problem with students completing homework. If they didn't, they lost recess the next day and did the homework with me. They soon learned it was better to get it done at home than to not do it at all.
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Old 10-07-2019, 04:16 PM
 
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I've decided that I don't care if my students do their homework or not. I let them clip up if they turn it in, and then I throw them away.
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Old 10-07-2019, 04:52 PM
 
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At the last few schools I've worked at, clip charts and taking recess away weren't allowed.
I'm not a big fan of homework. It's okay if it supports things that are done in class that students can do independently. Often, the homework is things that some kids might need help on (so either they're practicing incorrectly or they need supervision by parents) so it ends up being harder for kids whose home life is dysfunctional or who don't have parents there to prompt them to do it. I'm a fan of homework that involves reading or reviewing for tests.
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Old 10-07-2019, 04:59 PM
 
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I agree with cruxian. On top of the dysfunction and not having parents around, I literally witnessed a student getting off the bus at his house an hour and a half after dismissal. That is how long his bus ride was. He lives a five minute drive from our school, but after dropping the three neighborhoods off his house was on the way back to the bus barn so probably last stop. Reading or reviewing all the way. No worksheets.


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It depends...Just my thoughts,
Old 10-07-2019, 05:05 PM
 
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since you asked, ...on the grade level. PK-4/6th I think the homework is basically worthless. It all depends on the schedule and household of the parent. The students have so little control of their situation...

Middle school should be homework an extension of and/or practice of the lesson given that day. I do think that the practice should be a little as needed as to ascertain mastery. I don't believe in homework just for the sake of homework. I think that the teacher needs to allow some time in class for examples and the first few problems so the students can do it at home without adult assistance.

In high school, it is a bit different. Hopefully, homework still meets the criteria above. Homework should be to practice, make permanent and also build responsibility but it should not take over a child's life. Even AP and higher level academics need moderation.

So, I am in favor of some homework at certain ages for certain times within certain criteria.
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Old 10-07-2019, 05:32 PM
 
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I agree with the writer and wish more parents opt out. Students need free time after a long school day. Its not for a teacher to decide what that free time should be. The schools I worked at for the most part had dysfunctional families with parents too busy providing the basics of life to help with homework if they even understood. I don't think students should be punished for not doing their homework. I much rather hear of a student kicking a goal and playing with friends then to get a paper. How much time does a child have to spend doing homework after a 6-1/2 hour day?
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I needed it
Old 10-07-2019, 06:25 PM
 
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My best teacher was my mother. She often helped me figure out math problems that I struggled with at school. If I didn't have homework, I don't know if she would have had the incentive to tutor me. I do think teachers can assign too much homework at times, but sometimes you need the extra practice. I am sceptical of the research against homework. I'm willing to bet you're average valedictorian did plenty of it.
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Old 10-07-2019, 06:31 PM
 
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I agree for elementary aged students. I could see the arguments being made for building responsibility/preparing for higher education etc. in middle and high school.

Perhaps this is just my school, but the expectations have gotten VERY rigorous over the years. All of the "fluff" and "just for fun" activities have been taken out of school. Our students get a 20 minute lunch and 20 minute recess. The rest of their day is highly structured with the expectation that they be engaged and working all day long. We make our young kids work HARD and they are in school for 7 hours. IMO it's highly inappropriate to make them go home and spend more time working, especially on busy work type stuff. If parents want to sit with them and do something specific, great. I've given parents who've asked some tasks and stressed they should spend no more than 10 minutes per night on it.

Fighting over a worksheet that for most of the students is above their current independent level makes no sense, IMO. I also work pretty close to my contract hours, outside of required meetings. How is it fair that I work to make sure I typically don't take work home, but then assign 5-7 year olds more work in addition to their school day? Nope, nope, nope.

Last year I had a parent come to an IEP meeting with an advocate ready to "fight" about homework for her first grader. We told her right away, no big deal. Research doesn't support it and it's only sent home in the first place because a parent survey said the majority wanted it . She was pleasantly surprised!
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Homework
Old 10-07-2019, 07:01 PM
 
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I think doing homework is important. These days, though, too many parents or older siblings to the homework for the child. Those without parents who would check homework, wouldn’t do it. So unfortunately, homework doesn’t do what it used to do. It was a waste of my time preparing it then. If a school as a whole has homework expectations and they are enforced, then it is helpful. I’ve had students take homework home and claim they didn’t know how to do it even though it was something reviewed all week. They did this just to get out of doing it. Listening and paying attention in class is an important habit to get into. One can’t escape homework when they get older. It’s too bad it’s no longer taken seriously.


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Old 10-07-2019, 07:03 PM
 
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I will say that personally I hate giving homework and even more I hate checking homework. But for some of my kids with a bad case of learned helplessnes or downright laziness, homework is the only practice they actually do. In my 16 years experience, despite what research may say, kids who do homework regularly are better students and make better grades than kids who don't do homework. Maybe it's correlation or maybe it's cause, but that's just what I have observed.
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Old 10-07-2019, 11:11 PM
 
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I student taught 7th grade and we couldn’t really give out homework because the kids just wouldn’t finish it, so we did everything in class( including writing essays, proofreading, etc). I think they should have a little responsibility by then, but I see why teachers don’t give it out. I think when they get to hs it sets them up for a bad experience when they suddenly have to do work outside of class.
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Old 10-08-2019, 02:27 AM
 
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Quote:
I am sceptical of the research against homework. I'm willing to bet you're average valedictorian did plenty of it.
This is anecdotal, of course, but I was a more or less average valedictorian.
In the olden days, when I was in elementary school, my school had a "no homework" policy till grade 6, when we could have it once a week or so. I spent a few minutes a night, and study hall, doing homework in junior high. Probably did an hour a night in high school, plus extra time for college classes I was taking.

What I remember about "after school" when I was a kid in elementary school was getting off the bus and going right upstairs to change into play clothes. We had a snack and then went outside. Outdoor play in almost all weather (unsupervised by any adult--we were a herd of kids basically running wild) till Mom rang the bell...then chores (set the table, help in the kitchen, feed the pets). Dinner at 6. More chores (clear table and dishes). Time to read or watch TV till 8, and then bed.

As a high school teacher, I moved more and more away from homework for most kids. They either didn't do it, or they overused the internet to help them "find the answers" without much thinking. After my own kiddos were in school I began to realize this:

Quote:
Perhaps this is just my school, but the expectations have gotten VERY rigorous over the years. All of the "fluff" and "just for fun" activities have been taken out of school. Our students get a 20 minute lunch and 20 minute recess. The rest of their day is highly structured with the expectation that they be engaged and working all day long. We make our young kids work HARD and they are in school for 7 hours.
And this:

Quote:
How much time does a child have to spend doing homework after a 6-1/2 hour day?
I gave real homework to AP students, but only limited work to others. Gave a daily open notes/homework quiz which kids graded themselves and I collected. I recorded grades but did not count them in the quarter grade calculation. If a student was having trouble on tests, I had a record of their homework effort and could show them (and parents) the cause and effect relationship between effort and test results.
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Old 10-08-2019, 02:42 AM
 
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I agree with the "no homework" idea at minimum for lower elementary (maybe beyond!). The kids who really need extra practice are either going to be the kids who aren't going to do it anyway, or kids whose parents will ask for something to help them with.

As others have said, kids have to work really hard in school, even down in kindergarten. I firmly believe in the value of plenty of free play time, family time, and (hopefully) an early enough bed time to get good sleep. If my school didn't require homework, I wouldn't send anything beyond the "assignment" to read with their child daily.
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Old 10-08-2019, 07:20 AM
 
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High school Spanish teacher here. Students rarely do the (very simple) homework that I assign. Even with HW being only 15% of their overall average, they don't choose to take it seriously. They copy others' work before turning it in. They use an online translator to look just about everything up. Most say that they go home and play videogames and/or play on their phones until late at night (and beyond). I won't stop giving HW because I feel it's important to those who want to learn Spanish. Some of my colleagues have stopped giving HW. Now, their challenge is to figure out where that 15% will need to be placed since they stopped giving it.
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Old 10-08-2019, 12:43 PM
 
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The kids who need it don't do it, and the kids who do it, don't need it.

I assign homework when required by my principal, and that is usually under pressure from parents, who then don't ensure their children actually complete the homework. I don't mark it, or keep a record of who does it, and view the whole thing as a huge waste of everybody's time.

After school is play time. Let them play and be kids, heaven knows we dont do that much at school any more.
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When I first started teaching..
Old 10-08-2019, 01:38 PM
 
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we did not give homework in first grade. When I changed schools homework was given in first grade. I came to see the value of it. The students started to see that learning went beyond the school walls and beyond the school hours. We asked the students to practice their spelling words, do one math activity and read for up to 20 minutes. This type of homework seemed to improve the students skills and their attitude towards learning. It also helped the parents have a more realistic view of how their child was learning.
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Old 10-08-2019, 01:51 PM
 
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I teach first grade and send home a packet with a newsletter, reading log, and 2-3 worksheets.

I work in an economically and educationally diverse area. The families run the gamut from overly interested in homework, completely disinterested in homework, do educational activities at home anyway (e.g. read together, play games, cook, talk), to not a lot of stimulation at home.

I do have some families that WANT to help their children learn but don't know how. If I send home a phonics worksheet or math worksheet, this may stimulate conversation around what the child is learning. I find it is too vague to say "practice short vowel words" or "practice adding to 10."

I do not give consequences for children not doing the homework (not their fault at 6 years old) and I tell parents that the most important thing is to read together for fun, and that homework should not take more than 5-10 minutes.
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