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MissAgnes MissAgnes is offline
 
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MissAgnes
 
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Meetings with an interpreter.
Old 10-17-2019, 01:14 PM
 
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Oy. Have IEP meetings all day, and most of them are with non-English speaking parents.
It gives me a headache listening to the info given in two languages basically at the same time. Especially when I speak someof the native language. My brain tries to keep up with both the English and native language!
And the SPED teacher doesn't take breaks in his speech. So the poor interpreter is having a tough time.
I usually parse my speech to allow for better translation.


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ZipLine ZipLine is online now
 
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Old 10-17-2019, 01:41 PM
 
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Sounds like at least one teacher in your district could use an in-service on how to work with an interpreter. Whether it’s a foreign language interpreter or a sign language interpreter effective communication depends on working well together. It’s a skill.
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ConnieWI ConnieWI is offline
 
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Suggestion...
Old 10-17-2019, 03:00 PM
 
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It might be a good idea for you to speak with your special ed teacher about this. A suggestion of this type should not ruffle anyone's feathers.
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Haley23 Haley23 is offline
 
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Old 10-17-2019, 03:01 PM
 
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Doing "simultaneous interpretation" where the interpreter speaks at the same time as the English speaker is apparently the new thing- we use a service and they all want to do it that way this year. The first couple of times I said yes; our classroom teachers loved it because it made the meetings go faster. But it drives me crazy. I have an extremely hard time focusing, and I'm the one presenting the information/who knows what I'm talking about. I can't imagine what it's like for the parents in that situation who are hearing everything for the first time and don't have much background. After a few times I put my foot down and told them no, we'd be using the "old" way.

If the interpreter couldn't keep up I don't understand why they wouldn't just tell the speaker to slow down or stop at certain points. For the simultaneous thing I was told to speak normally, even though it felt super awkward. Usually I can get away with a couple of sentences, but we do have one interpreter who can only do 3-4 words at once. I dread when this person is the one who comes in because it makes the meetings so painful.
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TAOEP TAOEP is offline
 
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Old 10-17-2019, 07:05 PM
 
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The worst IEP meeting was one I attended where the translation was being done by the department secretary. However, I know a fair amount of Spanish (the language being used) and the woman was NOT translating. She was "explaining" and even giving opinions. Absolutely unprofessional, but of course she was not a trained translator.


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MissESL MissESL is online now
 
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Translation
Old 10-18-2019, 03:25 AM
 
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I am the person who translates if it is not my student. If it is my student, I do NOT translate, because it is impossible for me to translate and be a part of the meeting. It is overwhelming and confusing. Lots of “noise litter.”

I suggest that you ask your principal for 10-ish minutes at the beginning of a staff meeting or building PD time to give a few “helpful tips” about how to handle meetings that require translators. Sometimes, people who don’t speak 2+ languages just don’t know they’re making it difficult.

I would especially include making eye contact and talking directly to the intended audience, NOT the translator. I would also specifically include asking the speaker to stop about every second sentence for translation, because the translator is only human...by the time the speaker has said their piece, I’ve forgotten half of from trying so hard to remember it. It has also been extremely helpful for me, as a teacher, NOT a sped teacher or professional translator, to have a draft copy OR salient points/big words ahead of the meeting so that I can make notes. Sometimes rare teens or medical terminology is needed in IEP meetings especially, and I don’t know those terms necessarily. Giving your translator an opportunity to prepare for the meeting is important, too.
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