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Favorite Perennials?
Old 05-07-2020, 08:14 AM
  #1

What are some of your favorite easy to maintain perennials? I am redoing the landscaping on the side of my house and need some ideas of what to plant. Also, what combinations go well together... this is the east side of the house, if that matters.

Thanks!


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Old 05-07-2020, 08:18 AM
  #2

For shady areas hostas are my go to plant. They are very easy AND, as a bonus, you can eat them!
For the sun, Daylilies are easy. I just got done planting some that were separated from my MILís grave. I also like rose bushes for sunny areas.
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Old 05-07-2020, 08:20 AM
  #3

We just did this last week! Not sure where you live, but that will make a difference. We planted some hostas, liriope, these ground cover roses that get around 2 feet at the largest, some salvia, and a ground cover rhododendron plant that gets about 2 feet. We also planted a few hydrangea bushes!
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Flowers...
Old 05-07-2020, 09:21 AM
  #4

I love coneflowers. They are drought resistant. Rudebeckia, also called Black-eyed Susans, are very pretty.
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Old 05-07-2020, 10:23 AM
  #5

Same as MAC mama- I do daylilies in the sun and hostas in the shade. Both are really, really easy. The bonus is they can be split apart when they get too big and you can use them in other area of your yard or give them to friends.


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Old 05-07-2020, 10:27 AM
  #6

I agree with all the ones already suggested.
Another one thatís easy is what we call Hens and Chicks. Itís a green succulent. Really low maintenance.
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Old 05-07-2020, 11:08 AM
  #7

My father always had Irises on the NE side of the house. I keep saying I will plant some but haven't got around to it.

My husband love hastas and they are planted on the NE side of our house in partial shade.
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Shade Loving Perennials
Old 05-07-2020, 11:45 AM
  #8

We have planted several varieties of ferns and love them! They are low maintenance and fill in garden spaces nicely.
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Old 05-07-2020, 12:06 PM
  #9

Bleeding hearts and astilbes go well together and do well in the shade. I also like hostas.
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flowers
Old 05-07-2020, 01:21 PM
  #10

Shasta daisies, hostas, coneflowers and rudebeckia are great and hassle free. You'll need to split them every 3-4 years and you can share them. Penstemon and salvias are great too. These are all tall plants. For something short, lamium looks great in front or for edging.


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Old 05-07-2020, 02:30 PM
  #11

Love columbines. They reseed at the end of summer and keep multiplying. I also love lambs ear. Sometimes they donít make it through the winter
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Old 05-07-2020, 04:10 PM
  #12

I have hostas in the shade. Lots of different daylilies in the sun. For tall plants I love my purple balloon flowers and yellow coreopsis. I just dug up a lot of my remaining white irises because I've had them for 30 years, they spread a fair amount and I was sick of them. I love my purple ones though. I live in NH, zone 5.
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Perennial plants and flowers (LONG)
Old 05-07-2020, 07:03 PM
  #13

I have literally 10 garden beds; 14 if you count the ones around trees where I have planted shade plants. We moved into this house 4 summers ago and there was no landscaping —and no grass —so I have been working hard the past three springs plus this one doing LOTS of planting. For bushes and shrubs, I wanted ones that flowered and I wanted mostly evergreen ones because I didn’t want my beds to turn into stick-y, dead wastelands over the winter. And for plants and flowers, I only wanted perennials because I didn’t want to have to keep planting new stuff every year. I’ve been lucky with the bushes, as they have all mostly been happy where I initially planted them; the plants and flowers, on the other hand, were somewhat of a lesson in trial and error the first couple of years as I figured out what did or did not do well and where. This year I was able to just watch and enjoy everything coming back after the winter. I’ll happily share a list of my flowering shrubs and bushes in another post if you want, but here are most of my perennial plants and flowers:

I have bushy, healthy snapdragons ( tall ones, not the trailing kind) that stayed green through the winter and even bloomed occasionally during the winter. I live in Georgia , if that matters. My sister lives in Ohio and her snapdragons die back completely in the winter but come back every spring. The yellow ones seem to be the hardiest and fill out and bloom like gangbusters for me every spring, whereas other colors are hit-or-miss. I have them in part sun (a few hours of sun per day.)

Balloon flowers (Platycodon, I think) are my favorite perennials, I think. They die back in the winter but come back well in the late spring. They’re late to bloom — around June — but continue to bloom for me until about October —large star-shaped flowers. Mine are a beautiful purple, but they also come in white, and maybe other colors too. They do not transplant well, so be sure about where you plant them. I have them in part-sun.

My dianthus stay green through the winter. The red ones seem to be the hardiest; I haven’t had great luck with any other color. Even the red ones get somewhat scraggly over the winter and need to be trimmed way back in the early spring, but they fill out again nicely within a few weeks. They bloom well all spring, all summer, and somewhat through the fall and even a little in the winter here. They are in part-sun.

Coreopsis Grandiflora ( a.k.a. Tickseed) that I planted last year. They stayed green all winter and became really bushy in early spring — probably tripled in size from last year. Each one has about 10-15 buds getting ready to open right now, and they will continue to bloom yellow aster-like flowers all summer. They are in full sun.

I also have lantana that dies off in the winter but comes back consistently every spring. Full sun.

Daffodils that bloom in late February / early March for a few weeks. Leave the leaves alone even when they get droopy because they continue to absorb sunlight all summer , which provides the energy for next years blooms. Their bulbs like to be planted very shallowly in the fall. Part-sun or full-sun.

Irises have rhizomes (similar to bulbs) that also like to be planted very shallowly — in fact, it’s best to leave a little bit of it above-ground. Best to plant or divide these in the fall. They also bloom for a few weeks in the spring — later than my daffodils — and also absorb sunlight into their leaves all summer to provide the energy for next year’s blooms. Part-sun to full-sun.

Lamium makes great ground cover for a larger bed because it spreads. It’s evergreen, and mine blooms very well in the spring and fairly well through the summer. I have a kind with lavender-colored blooms (Orchid Frost, I think it’s called) in two of my garden beds, but I have another kind growing wild down an embankment. It has larger leaves and makes yellow blooms for several weeks in the early spring but then not again until the next year.

My heuchera and heucherella ( also known as Coral Bells) do well in partly-shady areas and send up tall spikes with delicate flowers along them. Different variations of these plants come with different-colored leaves — from yellowish, to lime green, to true green, to red, to a dark purplish-green. They are somewhat evergreen, though they die back over the winter to a low, small cluster of leaves around the base.

My Lenten Roses ( Hellebores) also like shade and are evergreen. they bloom in late winter and the blooms last until early spring.

[Flower] As many others have said, my hostas come back hardily every year after dying back in the winter. During the summer they form tall spikes with delicate flowers. They like part-shade.

[Flower] I also have setcresea, which I love. The leaves are purple and it makes little delicate pink flowers all spring and summer. It dies back in the winter but comes back in the spring, but I’ve heard it doesn’t always survive the winter in colder zones. (I’m in Zone 7.) I have it in part-sun.

Everything I listed except the hostas are theoretically deer-resistant, but they do occasionally nibble on my heuchera and heucherella and my setcresea even so. I spray them every few weeks with Liquid Fence Deer and Rabbit Repellent and it usually keeps them from nibbling. I also spray my hostas, which I was told at a nursery are “deer candy.” But as long as I spray them about once a week, they usually leave my hostas alone.
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Old 05-08-2020, 04:49 AM
  #14

Many years ago, I found some Scottish bluebells at a garden center. They were very hardy, required almost no maintenance, and came back every summer for a long time. For some reason, these flowers seem to be impossible to find now, but perhaps there's a garden center somewhere that sells them. If nothing else, seeds are available.

Another favorite is a similar flower, the Carpathian bellflower, also known as the Carpathian harebell or tussock bellflower.

Mme Escargot, you mentioned dianthus, and I've also had good luck with them. As you correctly point out, they do require a little maintenance in the spring.
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