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What’s wrong with this scenario?
Old 07-18-2020, 09:35 PM
  #1

Posted on my local NextDoor neighborhood social media site:

Quote:
HS ELA tutor is needed. Looking for ELA tutor for accelerated 8th grader who will study 9th grade this year. Writing, reading skills improvement.

If your kid is accelerated enough to be working a grade level ahead, then why does he / she need a tutor at all, much less help with reading improvement? Why not just have the kid do on-level work?


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Old 07-18-2020, 09:39 PM
  #2

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f your kid is accelerated enough to be working a grade level ahead, then why does he / she need a tutor at all, much less help with reading improvement? Why not just have the kid do on-level work?
This drives me crazy at our school. We have parents who push and push for their kids to be working a grade ahead in math, but then the student struggles and they want modified homework or for the teacher to give extra support.

It's all about bragging rights, not what's actually best for the child.
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Old 07-19-2020, 05:04 AM
  #3

Because advanced students have a right to grow every year, too.
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Old 07-19-2020, 05:33 AM
  #4

Because the child's intelligence is beyond their writing and reading skills. The child may have ADHD or other issue that require the child to need additional one on one that he won't get through the school system.

It sucks for an intellectually gifted student whose concrete skills lag. If a student can intellectually think many years beyond their age but their reading and writing skills will hold them back from excelling, why not have them tutored?

I don't see the problem with it.

Now that is different than an average child intellectually by at grade or slightly above in concrete skills being tutored in reading or writing to try to get them to be intellectually gifted. Improvement like that is rare.
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Old 07-19-2020, 05:49 AM
  #5

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Because advanced students have a right to grow every year, too.
What sevenplus said.


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Old 07-19-2020, 06:10 AM
  #6

Double post. Whoops!
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Old 07-19-2020, 06:11 AM
  #7

I worked at a charter school for identified gifted students, we actually had a few students who had been accepted into MENSA. Our curriculum was all accelerated a year. I taught first grade and used all second grade curriculum (except for writing due to developmental reasons).

Many of the students in the school had tutors for various reasons/subjects.
Some students were gifted in one area and not another, some excelled in math but struggled with ELA or vice versa. Also, a gifted IQ doesn’t always equate to high academic achievement or high motivation.
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It could be
Old 07-19-2020, 06:18 AM
  #8

It could be that the kid is in GT on an accelerated track and English is just not his/her thing. My dd has been on the GT/AP track since 6th grade and she is a sophomore this year. She is not a math person. She did fine in Algebra 1 GT her 8th grade year (which is 9th grade math), but struggled mightily with geometry this past year (freshman year sophomore class). She attended tutoring. I'm waiting to see what this year holds for Algebra II.
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Old 07-19-2020, 08:06 AM
  #9

My brother has a recorded IQ of 130+. He's exceptionally brilliant in paper. I have a recorded IQ of 113. (Yes, we both had our IQ tested when we were younger.) On paper he is smarter than myself; based on grades I am the much smarter sibling. He was in GT programs and I wasn't.

My brother barely made it though high-school and dropped out of college twice before finishing a Physical Therapist Assistant program at age 30. His IQ does not equate to academic ability. He needed lot of academic help in high school. I needed none. He graduated with a 2.63. I graduated with a 3.8something. It took a lot of work for him to qualify for the PTA program and he worked really hard to graduate - harder than most college students.

Its very realistic that that child honeatly needs academic help.
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