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New Student- Arabic Speaking
Old 06-16-2014, 08:39 AM
 
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Hello,

I am not an ESL teacher and I was surprised this morning with a lovely new student who only speaks Arabic. I am at a loss for what to do. We only have 6 days left of the school year. I'd appreciate any help you can offer.

A list of words I may need to say to her would be great... typical things teachers say in the classroom. Anything else I will look at also!


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Old 06-16-2014, 10:40 AM
 
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This is the extent of the Arabic I learned while teaching in the Middle East:

as-salām 'alaykum-literally means "Peace be with you", but it is used as a greeting

Marahaba means welcome
La means no
Halas means enough/stop
Shokran means thank you
enshallah means literally "God Willing", but it is kind of used like, yes, it will happen, ok
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Could this help?
Old 06-16-2014, 12:08 PM
 
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This is for ESL newcomers in general.

http://www.oswego.org/webpages/lstev...m?subpage=9412
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App called translate
Old 06-16-2014, 12:18 PM
 
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There is an App on my phone called Translate. Works great
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Old 06-16-2014, 12:39 PM
 
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I would not attempt to use the Arabic language without real training in it. It is very easy to come across as offensive in a language you do not know ( not specific to Arabic). And I would avoid translation tools (other than a native or very well trained speaker).

Instead I would focus on providing as much scaffolding and visual support as possible. Keep in mind that Arabic is read right to left, so this student may (or may not?) need visual cues to track left to right when following along with a reader. If you are reading from a board or projection, consider using a visual device to track across the words. Model everything. Perhaps pair the student with another--kids often find their own ways to communicate!

For only 6 days the best you can do is to provide solid structure and as much assistance as possible.

ETA: Also keep in mind possible cultural differences. For example, in some cultures children are taught that it is disrespectful to make eye contact with a teacher. So they are confused when teachers say, "Look at me when I'm speaking to you." This is just one example.


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Old 07-15-2014, 05:46 PM
 
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Do you think you will have the same student next academic year? If so, do not worry. Not being able to speak Arabic is not a big deal. Most important is that you make the student welcome. When you teach, speak clearly, and slowly. Repeat directions a few times. Ask other students to repeat directions for you. Provide student with flashcards of basic high-frequency words: hello, may I, can I, bathroom, etc. Building student's vocabulary at this early stage of language acquisition is the first step and very important. Use TPR (Total Physical Response) when you give directions and teach. For example, when you teach addition within 10, use fingers to show numbers, cross your arms to indicate plus sign and make them parallel horizontally to indicate an equal sign. Encourage the student to speak Arabic in class.
Culturally Responsive Teaching, research!
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