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Numbers?
Old 04-12-2013, 03:46 AM
 
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I was wondering if some of your dedicated ESL teachers could share the number of students you are responsible for.

I'd also like to know if you are more of a pull-out, push-in, or another type of program.

My district is re-thinking our ESL program, and I am trying to do some research to find something that would work best for us.

Thanks!


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Old 04-12-2013, 12:39 PM
 
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I work in a small district teaching 7th and 8th grade only. My students come to me one period a day in addition to their "regular" language arts class. I typically have anywhere from 10-25 students that I am responsible for. Sometimes I am able to mix the two levels into one class, other years I have them divided, depending on population. This year I have 18 students in one grade level. I feel like any more than that would greatly affect my ability to differentiate and focus on each student's individual needs. On the other hand, my class with only 5 students is difficult because it is hard to have meaningful whole-group conversations and role models. I often think that a push-in model would work well with our small population, but with my other duties it wouldn't work at this time.
I'd love to see what other models teachers are using.
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Numbers
Old 04-16-2013, 05:25 AM
 
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In my district, we try to have a ratio of 1 teacher per 50 students. This year I am at a high school but only responsible for Freshmen. I have 32 students. I do pull-out sessions. Since I am in a small room my groups are 4 students at the max.

I have taught at the elementary level years prior. I have been responsible for 110 students one year with an assstant. Another year I had 80 students on my own.

At the elementary level, we had tried push-in but it just was not working. It was difficult to meet the needs of the students linguistically with the other students constantly disturbing us or other reasons. My results showed tremendous growth with pull-out.

Best of luck!
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Old 04-28-2013, 04:47 AM
 
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I work at the elementary level (3rd grade this year). I have approximately 40 students on my case load. The amount of time I spend with them depends on their ELL level. The higher kids are successful with the grade level curriculum for the most part and may only need some writing support. The lower kids need the most support, building basic and academic vocabulary, reading & writing skills. In my district ELL kids are placed together, usually across 2 classrooms. There are 2 ESOL classrooms, 2 SPED classrooms, and one regular. This way the ESOL & SPED teacher have easier access to their students. It's much more difficult when kids are sprinkled across every classroom. Scheduling is the biggest obstacle in this situation.

I am a firm believer in the push in and co-teaching model. Not only do my students benefit from the English speaking models in the classroom, but the non-ESOL kids benefit from my lessons that are supported with lots of meaningful visuals, realia, and hands on activities. My ELL students learn from their classmates, and being able to communicate with them is a tremendous motivator for learning English skills.

I plan each week with the classroom teachers. We talk about what lessons she'll lead and which lessons I'll lead. We talk about strategies and resources to use to help the ELL students with content. During guided reading instruction, the classroom teacher pulls her groups to the back table and I pull my groups to my table.

I don't believe in pulling out (but a lot of people prefer it). When you pull out you, inevitably students miss out on important information when they are gone from the room and classroom teachers often forget to relay that information to the students when they return. Students also come back into the classroom not knowing what to do and need catching up on what the class is doing. It just breaks the natural flow of the day when you pull kids out of their "community" classroom. They CAN learn in the classroom.

I will say that out of the 4 ESOL teachers at my school, I am the only one who prefers pushing in, the rest pull out. I worked for administrators in the past who wanted co-teaching and did not allow ANY pull out. It was at this time that I saw the positive impact of this model and will never go back to pulling out And I have found that most classroom teachers really like co-teaching.
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