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BEE4kids BEE4kids is offline
 
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Old 08-05-2013, 03:13 PM
 
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This year I have a student who reads on a first grade level. I do not want them to be bored. I am planning on sending them to first grade for reading. What are some other ideas you have used when they are in your class with the others?


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Old 08-05-2013, 04:17 PM
 
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I let my 4 yr old who could read on a third grade level read everything out loud to the class whenever possible. For example: the weekly reader, our new bulletin boards, the school published newspaper, etc. I made a reading group just for her (no option to send her to another grade for reading). I let her pick out the chapter books she would read to me. I gave her some extra reading type assignments to do at home. I think it all worked out ok, she was a brilliant little girl, but was easy going. She did not seem to be bored often.
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Old 08-05-2013, 04:37 PM
 
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Thanks for the ideas! They will help.
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Old 08-05-2013, 08:27 PM
 
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We don't have the option of sending them to another grade level.

This year I had a student who started out reading on the first grade level. We use Benchmark Literacy so I was able to print out copies of books on his level. I could have borrowed the leveled books from the first grade teachers. Plus, there were e-book versions so he could read the books online.

In Benchmark Literacy, you introduce/model strategies to the whole group. Then students practice that strategy when reading books on their level during guided reading groups. It is vertically aligned. (If Unit 5 in K focused on "making connections", Unit 5 in first grade focused on that same strategy. So he was able to practice the same strategy we were working on reading books on his level.

I started meeting with him for guided reading at the beginning of the year where the rest of my class did not start guided reading groups until Nov/Dec. (The last group wasn't ready until Jan.) They worked on skills during small group time.

I only formally met with him once a week, but then would meet with him informally during the week. I had a subscription to RAZ-Kids. He read books on there. I printed out activities to go along with those books for him to do independently. I allowed him to pick books from the classroom library. He kept a reading response journal-made connections, identified story elements...did book reviews that he shared with other students.

I talked to the other K teachers. Some of them also had one student who was working on the same level as my student. So we started the Friday Club. We felt it was important for them to be exposed to other students on their advanced level to challenge them. We had six students in the group. The teachers took turns hosting the group on Fridays. We planned extension activities to go along with the advanced books that they were reading.

My student liked to do little projects. He would pick a topic. Then we would find books for him on that topic. I had a list of things that he could do. He had to pick one from the list, but was allowed to do more if he wanted. (i.e. make a Venn diagram to compare the two characters, draw and label a picture, make a story map...) After he read about ants, he made a 3D model of an ant and labeled the parts.
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Old 08-05-2013, 08:33 PM
 
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I wouldn't worry about boredom. There are so many things they can do in K, and so many ways to up the ante for them. The pp's had some great suggestions. Also, usually good readers still need a lot of practice writing, so you can place more emphasis there.
I once had a child who read at a 5th grade level when entering K - that was quite a challenge!


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Consider writing/comprehension
Old 08-06-2013, 07:50 AM
 
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From my experience, those high readers always seem to be lacking in the writing area (fine motor) and comprehension because, of course, they are just five (give or take). We use DRA2 and written retells are a BIG part of comprehension as you move through the levels.

I've teamed up with other k teachers and shared the combined high reading group made up of kids from more than one class. We each took a month to work with the kiddos. We did a lot with written retells and graphic organizers for comprehension activities...somebody wanted, but, so, beginning/middle/end, etc.

We don't push them up to first either. Parents are so quick to think their child will be bored because their child happened to be one to "break the code" in reading early in. There is so much more to reading. We are very concerned about comprehension in our district and writing about reading. Just because they can decode the words doesn't mean they have any idea about what they are reading. Stepping back to make SURE they are comprehending and can write about their reading is what we focus on.

I really encourage my high readers to choose from my classroom library of picture books and discover favorite authors and genres. There are sooooo many excellent picture books out there that have appropriate subject matter...why make them read level 12 or 24 books all the time? Let them explore and enjoy your classroom and the school library during readers workshop and when taking home books. Every single book they read doesn't have to come from the literacy library "at their level".

I can't stand it when parents tell me day #1 that they are afraid their little genius will be BORED because they can read just about anything. Gaps in writing and comprehension are usually always there. That's the perfect kind of instruction for these little guys, in my humble opinion; not sending them to first grade. Once parents realize you have a plan and their kids are, in deed, learning new things, they back off.

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Old 08-06-2013, 02:33 PM
 
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All excellent advice! Thanks for all your input. This will help a lot.
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