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senseigold senseigold is offline
 
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senseigold
 
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time in program
Old 09-21-2011, 05:47 AM
 
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How much time do you see your gifted kids per week? Especially fourth graders.
What is your school's policy concerning the material missed while in the gifted program? Can classroom teachers decide whether or not a child goes to gifted?

We are beginning a new program (new teacher) and it is being proposed the children are pulled out 3 1/2 hours a week, with a scattered schedule so they will not miss the same subject repeatedly (and will not miss math at all).

Many of our classroom teachers feel that is too much time out of class and feel that they should not be out of the room because they will not be there for the lessons being taught and may negatively affect the teachers' overall standardized test scores.


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magoosmom magoosmom is offline
 
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Old 09-21-2011, 07:05 AM
 
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Our state (Mississippi) mandates that a child identified for the gifted program must receive 5 hours a week of gifted instruction. Schools can handle this however they choose. I see my students for about 1 hour a day. I know of other schools that work in 2 hour blocks 2 days a week, and 1 hour another day. At the middle school, the students come to me like a regular class. In the elementary, I pull them out of their classroom. I work on a staggered schedule to avoid pulling from the same class twice. Most groups miss a specials class (art, music, or PE) once a week to make this work.

Our state also says that a student is NOT required to make up any work missed while in their gifted class. However, they are required to know the material for the test. So it is up to the student to decide whether they need to make that up or how they will prepare for the test. I often advise the students to ask, when they return to their classroom, what they have missed and to evaluate whether it is something they need to go ahead and complete. Also, many of our teachers take the time to work on review skills during the time gifted students are gone. It depends on the teacher though.

The only way a child can be held out of gifted class is a) if the parent withdraws them from the program; or b) if they are under performing in the gifted classroom. However, I have been flexible with teachers. If a student is finishing a test or if there is a special occasion happening, I will usually allow the student to stay in the classroom. It shouldn't become a regular thing, however. I will say that we serve intellectually gifted (not academically) with our program. Not every student is going to be at the top of their class.

It has caused problems in the past, but usually if a child begins slipping, the parent opts to remove them from the program. I had a 5th grader last year who suddenly dropped and her mother removed her from the program. They must stay out an entire semester, but then if the parent chooses, they can be placed back in. Since middle school classes don't interfere with the core subjects, her mom opted to place her back in.
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yesteach yesteach is offline
 
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Old 01-03-2012, 03:35 PM
 
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How much time do you see your gifted kids per week? Especially fourth graders.

Students from first to fourth come for a full day once per week. They are here from 9:00 to 2:30.

What is your school's policy concerning the material missed while in the gifted program?
Teachers can not require the student to make up the work that is missed while they are out, district policy. A parent can request a copy of the missed work if they feel their child needs it (example, I have a student who is low in grammar, so his mom always gets his grammar work from his homeroom teacher and goes over it with him at home. He does NOT have to complete it and/or return it, it's just for her convenience. Also, I am required to give teachers a grade for students in all subject areas (reading, math, language, science and social studies) each six weeks.

Can classroom teachers decide whether or not a child goes to gifted?No. The only reason a child can be kept from pullout is if they are suspended (in or out of school). If a student should end up in an alternative placement situation, the student has to be served in that classroom, either by the pullout teacher or the classroom teacher (if they have gifted qualifications)


Many of our classroom teachers feel that is too much time out of class and feel that they should not be out of the room because they will not be there for the lessons being taught and may negatively affect the teachers' overall standardized test scores.

I get this argument all the time; however, I also cover core content when they are with me - reading, language, writing, math, science, social studies). First of all, if they are gifted, odds are these are NOT the students who are in danger of not doing well on standardized tests! It also requires working closely with the classroom teacher for those students. If I know a student is struggling with a particular skill, and the teacher lets me know that, I can work with that student on the day they are in pullout. I get really tired of "missing a whole day of school", they aren't missing a day... they're just in a different classroom!
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