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Teddi9192 Teddi9192 is offline
 
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This will knock your socks off
Old 04-18-2007, 08:35 AM
 
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My son is probably gifted or at the minimum very bright. (1st grade but they don't test at his age) A teacher in school recomended a solution to his being able to out think his peers. (hold on to those socks) Don't let him read or do anything about learning over the summer. I shouldn't be allowed to encourage him or offer him opportunities such as science museums, classes or trips to the library. That way he will be more like his peers. The principal about wet her pants!


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What?!?
Old 04-25-2007, 02:27 PM
 
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Yes ma'am, I'll "dumb down" my son so he'll fit right in with the others...I can't believe any teacher would say such a thing. I'm so shocked, I'm having a hard time making my thoughts coherent!
It kills me how we offer so much for those who don't speak English, and those who need extra help, but we can't offer more for those who are brighter or who work at a faster pace.
This year at our school, about $200,000 dollars went to waste because this money could only be used for second language learners. It can't just be that you have a majority in your classroom, but that there's not even a chance that an English only kid will look/touch a computer/book/manipulative that was purchased with those funds.
Sometimes I wish we could "track" kids again, then you could have a "gifted" class or whatever, and teach to their level. Right now it's hard to reach everyone.

I hope your son enjoys his summer, and every museum, each trip, and every visit to the library you share with him. And I hope he gets a teacher who can help him grow and challenge him next year.
De'Anna
(Sorry for the vent in my post )
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normal is a setting on the dryer
Old 05-07-2007, 12:39 PM
 
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Thanks for your post, Teddi9192. A friend in Mensa told me that when she was a pre-schooler, her mom, who was not an educator, taught her to read using the backs of cereal boxes, the labels on cans, etc. When my friend arrived at parochial school kindergarden knowing how to read at a fifth grade level, the nun angrily spoke to the mom (with my friend present in the room) because the mom had taught her how. She remembers it quite vividly, and is now an engineer in her 50s.

The teacher in school needs to be educated (!). Actually, what the teacher said is both harmful and wounding. Makes me wonder what sort of personal educational experiences that teacher had. Being more like his peers, eh? Last time I checked, uniformity was not an educational goal. Normal is a setting on the dryer, and no one has 2.2 children.

Given that you say your son is probably gifted or very bright, I'm wondering why you haven't taken the initiative and had him tested. It's my understanding that tests are actually available, even if your school doesn't administer them at his age. Just a thought.

I'm glad you have the principal you do. Keep us posted.

PS: To the poster who wishes we could track kids again...we still do. We just track by chronological age rather than mental age, which underserves the gifted.
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I've heard this for the past three years....
Old 05-27-2007, 11:23 PM
 
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not neccessarily the "don't do anything" speech, but similar ones that seemed to imply that I THINK my son is more intelligent than he is and if he really were so intelligent, he wouldn't have ANY problems of ANY kind including behavior, social, or maturity issues and that was where we should be concentrating his efforts instead of allowing him to read grown-up books. I was even told he was "too smart for his own good". Huh?

I have also found out over the years that some teachers (including some that actually teach "gifted" classes) don't like intelligent children who do not act dumb around them or seem to worship the ground they stomp on.My son has actually "dematured"(I know that's not a real word) since he started to school. Since he was 2 he knew his left and right and could print his name correctly with the first letter capital and all the others lowercase, but when he went to school and realized that other kids wrote all capitals or didn't know L & R, he "dumbed down" to fit in with his peers.As a result, he was seen as inmature and less intelligent than he really was. It seemed the teachers liked him better as an "average kid" than as himself.

It's a pity. We don't allow him to get away with it. We expose him to anything and everything we want or think he will like or can learn from and everyone else can kiss my grits!
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