1st Year Special Ed Teacher Help - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      Special Education

1st Year Special Ed Teacher Help

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
happyheidi happyheidi is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Posts: 3
New Member

happyheidi
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Posts: 3
New Member
1st Year Special Ed Teacher Help
Old 07-20-2008, 07:27 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

Hi all!
I am just finishing my masters and about to start my first year teaching in a resource room (grades 1-2). I have not received any information from my principal yet in terms of what students I will have/how many, etc. My masters program finished August 1st, and I have to move, and start teaching very quickly (First day of school is 8/11). I have starting to panic because I feel like I should be preparing more, but I have so little information that I don't know what I can be doing. Does anyone have any tips for first year preparation that I can do out of state from my school? Also, does anyone know if resource teachers usually see all the students on the first day of school? Any tips/organization ideas would be GREATLY appreciated!! I am so excited to begin, but feel very unprepared. I will have the week of pre-planning (August 4th-8th) but I just feel like that's not enough time to get every thing ready.

Also-when do most people find out information about their caseloads?? I have emailed my principal but haven't gotten a response. Thanks!!


happyheidi is offline   Reply With Quote

jeejer's Avatar
jeejer jeejer is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 131
Full Member

jeejer
 
jeejer's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 131
Full Member
jeejer
Old 07-20-2008, 08:38 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

Usually resource teachers don't start pulling kids for at least a week. It gives the reg. ed teachers time for class bonding and getting used to the class routines. That will give you a week to set up schedules, etc.

Is this a strictly pull out program, or will you be doing some inclusion work? If you are doing inclusion then it is a good idea to get in the classrooms pretty quickly and set up a planning time with the reg. ed teacher(s). Is there another resource teacher you will be mentoring with? She/he should be a wealth of information about the specific procedures in your school/district.

The first couple meeting times with your pupils you will also want to set up your routines, and do some pre-assessment.

Obvioulsy, the most important thing is to quickly get into reading the IEP's and understanding the goal/objectives for each student. Make up a master list of when all your IEP's are due as well as your three year evals. This is so important so you don't miss those important dates. Give yourself as much lead time as possible scheduling the meetings, because so often you run into difficulty getting all schedules coordinated of the participating members.

It is interesting that you didn't hear anything about caseload in the interview process. How many first grade and second grade classrooms are there? Figure 5-10% of each class being on an IEP for something. Sometimes it is just speech or OT though which wouldn't be your responsibility.

Don't be too hard on yourself and try and not get run down because the most important thing is a teacher that is there, not one who is sick from over stressing and over working.

Good Luck!! I'm sure all will go well!
jeejer is offline   Reply With Quote
PPCDTeacher's Avatar
PPCDTeacher PPCDTeacher is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2006
Posts: 6,921
Senior Member

PPCDTeacher
 
PPCDTeacher's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2006
Posts: 6,921
Senior Member

Old 07-20-2008, 09:46 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

Don't panic. As a resource teacher you will probably have a week or two to have your program up and running, you'll find out info from the diagnostician in that time about your caseload, have time to read your kids IEP files, and you'll have the chance to work with the regular ed and special ed teachers on setting up your schedule, when you can pull them out or push in (whatever you're doing). You'll also likely have time to get into the classes and meet your kids (at least briefly). I started out as a resource teacher and I REALLY liked it. I don't remember much about it though (sorry, so I can't give you much advice) because I very quickly got pulled into teaching my own self-containted classroom of special needs kids. But while I DID teach resource (K-3 grades) I really did enjoy it!

Organization-- keep a separate file of info about each child. Keep it in a locked filing cabinet. Keep a copy of their IEPs and modifications (separate) even if you also have it in their ARD paperwork, just so you have it for quick reference, because you will probably need to look at those frequently.
PPCDTeacher is offline   Reply With Quote
hapEteachr hapEteachr is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Posts: 187
Full Member

hapEteachr
 
Joined: Jul 2008
Posts: 187
Full Member
What I have done...
Old 07-21-2008, 07:57 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

Hi happyheidi,
I am in a very similar situation. This will be my first year as a teacher also, and although I know I am teaching 6th grade learning support, I don't know what subjects yet or what the caseload is. I know I will have a couple classes I teach myself as well as some co-teaching. So far I have created a Powerpoint presentation to show the first day of school that outlines all of my routines, procedures, expectations, etc. I also created a Class Contract for students and parents to sign. I am going to keep a homework notebook so if students miss class, they can go to the notebook to see what the assignment was. (With younger kids, this could be a quick reference for you also.) On Fridays, my students who have completed their homework each day for the week are going to play Homeworkopoly. I am also going to start a Parent Contact Log. I will have hanging file folders for each student including IEPs, returned signed tests, progress monitoring info, as well as records of any behavior issues. I don't know if this helps, but it's all I've been able to do so far. (Many of these ideas came from this website.) Best of luck to you!
hapEteachr is offline   Reply With Quote
whatever's Avatar
whatever whatever is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 3,241
Senior Member

whatever
 
whatever's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2007
Posts: 3,241
Senior Member
I think it is really nice if you have a week
Old 07-21-2008, 08:31 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

or more before you have to pull students but I would not count on it. We start back to school 8/13 and there are two students I will have some on the first day. The others are expected to be in my room no later than Monday morning.

Even my first year, this was the case. I was still expected to read the IEP's, get my copies out, collect the classroom schedules, set up the student schedules, and all that. I was so overwhelmed and felt it was impossible. I barely had time to breathe.

It may be different for you though--especially if you are doing some pull out and some push in. I hope so.

In our school, the person to contact for the bulk of the logistics and technical stuff (caseloads, IEP, student count, etc) is the Director of Special Education. The principal is still my building supervisor and the overseer of my students so I talk with him about building stuff like going to my room and getting furniture and that kind of stuff.

Good luck. You will be fine either way. It calms some once scheduling is behind you.


whatever is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
Special Education
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 07:42 AM.

Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net