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AFischer
 
 
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AFischer
 
 
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problems decoding
Old 01-09-2006, 10:32 AM
 
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I am a brand new teacher working with a 3rd grader in resource reading. He is new to the program and hates it. His main difficulties are in decoding and fluency, especially with big words. The teacher I work with has him doing practice tests for the state test in April. He has zero problems with comprehension, but this practice is not helping his decoding skills or making him want to be in the class. Any ideas for a fun way to help him?


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Juli
 
 
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Juli
 
 
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Reading Outloud
Old 01-09-2006, 10:27 PM
 
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Have the child tape record a story he has read. Have him record his name, date, and title of book; then have him record once every week or two. Then he will be able to listen and hear his own progress as well as you having a record. Also, could he go go a younger class and read to a student from a book that he is familiar with and wouldn't struggle reading? Folder games and other manipulative type reading games can make learning decoding more fun. Check out teacher stores and catalogs.
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Mrs. B.
 
 
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Mrs. B.
 
 
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Decoding Help
Old 01-17-2006, 02:59 PM
 
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Hello. I assume this child has been evaluated for reading difficulties. You are right to be concerned. Practicing for state tests won't help the reading. You can get an old scrabble game and use it to help. First, make sure he knows his sounds. If necessary, teach them to him; and provide him plenty of practice. Then give him two Scrabble letter holders and nine tiles (you select which ones-include some vowels). Then he can use the letter tiles to manipulate the sounds and letters, something good readers have no problem with. Example: Have the child spell out c-a-t; change it to m-a-t, change it to m-o-t, change it to m-o-p, etc. These are word chains. The child can sound out each letter as necessary. He should tell you whether he is adding, substituting, deleting, or repeating a sound. The above exercise can be fun; and it does provide him with both reading and spelling skills. If he makes a mistake, have him "read" his word to you and compare with what you said. You can do this activity any length of time desired. You might also have him listen to you "sound out" some words sound-by-sound and have him tell you the word. Example: w-i-n-d = wind. I am a special ed. teacher and have found these activities useful as part of my 4th gr. resource reading program. Hope this helps.
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Justina
 
 
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Justina
 
 
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Trouble Decoding
Old 03-11-2006, 02:53 PM
 
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Hi,

Your best bet is simplified phonics found in "At Last! A Reading Method for Every Child." You can get it in the library - 5th Edition. It will be everything you will need. You can also go on the Message Board and post questions. Lots of worksheets on this site also.

Cassidy
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