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pinacolada pinacolada is offline
 
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Why arenít Preschool Teachers required to have a college degree?
Old 08-28-2018, 10:22 AM
 
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Why arenít preschool teachers required to have a college degree (BA or higher)? They are teaching children the fundamentals of reading and writing and the ones I have encountered have no knowledge of best practices like Words Their Way for example. Nor did they know the difference between phonemic awareness and phonics. Their methodologies for teaching alphabet acquisition are not what kindergarten teachers in public schools are using. Does any of their coursework cover early literacy skills, differentiating instruction, and working with special needs students?

Again thie aforementioned is based on what I have encountered. It doesnít speak for every preschool teacher.


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Old 08-28-2018, 10:42 AM
 
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Here, PreK is private and therefore not subject to credential reqs or licensure by the state.


Quote:
They are teaching children the fundamentals of reading and writing
In my opinion, PreK should be teaching socialization and play.
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Old 08-28-2018, 10:44 AM
 
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Iíve thought about this a lot actually. I have a college degree and taught preschool. I was paid $13 an hour with absolutely no benefits . No insurance options, no paid leave, nothing. I went back to school for my elementary certification because early childhood pays so little (at least in my area). When I left my pre school job, there were still some great teachers, but none of them had a degree.
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PreK
Old 08-28-2018, 10:45 AM
 
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Public school PreK teachers here are required to have a degree and a teaching license. Ones that work at private schools do not need those credentials.

I agree that kids that age should be playing and enjoying themselves. There is plenty of time for academics later.
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Old 08-28-2018, 01:21 PM
 
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4K teachers that work for the school district must have a degree.

The private preschool teachers do not need a degree, but my district has assigned three public school 4K teachers to private preschools. All the preschool teachers no matter what age group they teach are being mentored by the public school teachers. The 4K preschool teachers are using the district's curriculum under the direction of the public school teacher.

I think this is money well spent!!


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Old 08-28-2018, 02:23 PM
 
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In my 2 states ( live in 1, work in the other ) preschool teachers do need a degree and a teaching license. Both public and private.
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Ours do
Old 08-28-2018, 02:25 PM
 
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But the Preschool is part of our district too. The Lead teacher is a certified Early Childhood teacher and is paid on the Teacher Scale from the district. She supervises two-three paras each day.

But too, it is not daycare. The child has to be at least 3 and potty trained. They do not serve breakfast or lunch-just snack. The parents do not pay for the child to attend.

The child attends 1 to 5 days a week and is in the morning or afternoon session only. I am not sure how they determine who is there how many days or whatever they get.

I know that kids on an IEP get priority but all are welcome if they sign up. It is a voluntary program.
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Old 08-28-2018, 02:39 PM
 
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In our district (Western New York State), PreKindergarten is in our public Elementary school building. All of the preK teachers have a Bachelors Degree in Elementary Education and a Masters Degree in Early Childhood Education. It's required.
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Old 08-28-2018, 02:57 PM
 
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Private preschool teachers in my old state had to have a CDA (Child Development Associate) Credential. It used to require 60 hours in child development and then you had to have a portfolio, pass a written and oral in person test. I don’t know how that works now though. They alao got paid peanuts and had no insurance or retirement.
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pre-K
Old 08-28-2018, 03:19 PM
 
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Around here, our public Pre-K teachers do have degrees in Early Childhood Education, but...

Quote:
In my opinion, PreK should be teaching socialization and play.
Exactly!!!

Many of the the regulations are probably from a time when that was actually the case, so preschool teachers didn't need to know how to teach reading.


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Old 08-29-2018, 04:31 PM
 
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Our public TK (transitional Kinder) teachers are credentialed. Most other preschool teachers are not (or at least don't have to be).


I fully agree with Zia - preschool should be about learning social skills, emotional skills, and playing. Teachers should know best practices and be trained in ECE, but should not be teaching reading and writing.
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Old 08-29-2018, 05:57 PM
 
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I am a Pre-K teacher in our local public school system. Pre-K teachers are required to have at last a bachelor's degree in education and be certified.

I do not teach reading per se, but I do teach the skills that lay the foundation for learning to read and write in kindergarten. My students learn what letters are, that letters make sounds, and that we put letters together to make words. Most do learn some letters and sounds, though it's not required. Some are ready and really enjoy learning literacy skills and those students usually learn many letters and sounds simply because I make sure they are exposed to them in fun ways every day.

I do focus on social and emotional skills and all learning is through play and fun activities - no worksheets, etc. I do lots of read-alouds and modeled writing and I have books and writing materials in all learning centers (blocks/dramatic play/math/science/art/language/play dough) for students to use any way they choose if they choose. Most do use these materials to experiment with writing (scribbles/drawings/letter-like forms/random letters/some begin to copy words) at some point in the year when they are interested.

I have found that when Pre-K age students are exposed to beginning literacy skills in developmentally appropriate ways, the majority of them are interested. My main goal is to get them interested and have them wanting to learn to read and write in kindergarten.
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Old 08-29-2018, 06:11 PM
 
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Here, preschool is part of the regular school districts, but the teachers are considered classified staff (except for the special education team), so they're paid on that salary scale. No degree is required. They do have to take 3 classes in early childhood development, which the district does help pay for if they don't have them already.

The entire day is basically free play (I've observed numerous times over the years, so this isn't just an assumption). I'm not saying they should be sitting down doing worksheets, but our K expectations are EXTREMELY rigorous and it's frustrating when kids come into K after spending 2-3 years in preschool with literally NO skills...including basic social/emotional skills or "how to be at school" skills.

In wealthier districts where parents are reading to kids at home, teaching some basic skills, and language environments are richer, etc. this may not matter, but it makes a huge difference for our kids. The gap between the few "haves" and the "have nots" is HUGE right away and it's frustrating that pre-k doesn't do anything to close that. There are fun and play based ways to teach basic skills.
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Old 08-29-2018, 06:37 PM
 
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Sometimes I wonder if some of our later problems have to do with too academic an environment in PreK. Children can't hold pencils properly anymore. Too many boys (in particular but some girls) are frustrated with reading prior to first grade. If we focused more on play and habits, children would be better ready for formal academics.

Many of our preschool teachers are certified but here it is all private. No districts here offer preschool programs except to early intervention kids and even those programs are few and far between.
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Old 08-29-2018, 07:11 PM
 
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Quote:
Sometimes I wonder if some of our later problems have to do with too academic an environment in PreK. Children can't hold pencils properly anymore. Too many boys (in particular but some girls) are frustrated with reading prior to first grade. If we focused more on play and habits, children would be better ready for formal academics.

PREACH


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Old 09-04-2018, 05:41 PM
 
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Here the public and universal prek teachers are not required to have one, but so many have BAs in ECE you won't get a teacher job anymore. However, I've seen teachers pushed too prek without a degree or license in it. I have seen friends and family get the universal jobs, but must certified ECE teachers don't want those jobs or leave once the board gives them a better job. The line we get when someone without a BA gets in is "Prek isn't required".
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