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Studnet with ODD
Old 08-02-2011, 05:21 AM
 
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I am anticipating a studnet with ODD. He does not take meds? Any ideas strategies or suggestions would be welcome. Even a website would be great. I have been searching with little luck.


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some ideas that have worked for me
Old 08-02-2011, 05:36 AM
 
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Try not to get into a power struggle with him or her. Offer choices instead of demands. Be a little more flexible with things. For example if he or she wants to use a pen when they really should be using a pencil. Ask yourself,"Is this worth the power struggle?" Also try to build a relationship with the student right away. I have lunch with some of my most challenging students right away. We build a respectful relationship which helps when the discipline needs to occur.
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Suggestions
Old 08-02-2011, 05:42 AM
 
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Here are some thoughts.

*Do you have access to electronic databases? The ones with journals? Those will have some information. Check your public library-many subscribe to these.

*If you research websites, you can also try researching EBD. A lot of the strategies you use to help students with EBD are the same strategies you use to help students with ODD.

*Counseling for a child with ODD is often highly recommended. See if your school counselor or social worker can be of any help.

*Student control-give your classes choices and allow them to have a say in some things. Let them create the rules, consequences, etc. with your guidance. The more say a student has, the more likely they feel like they are actively involved in the classroom-this can often decrease behavioral problems.

*Class meeting-Having class meetings is a good way to allow students to form relationships with you and each other. Again, class meetings help students feel more connected to the classroom which can decrease negative behaviors. Use this as a time (without using names) to try to solve problems the class might be having.

*Relationships-studies show that the more positive relationship a teacher has with students, the less likely negative behaviors are to occur.

*Cool down time-There will be times when you and the student might "lose your cool". Have a cool down time procedure in place. For example, if the student feels like he or she is going to start screaming, get violent, etc...train him or her to sit outside the classroom and calm down before coming back in.

*Teach calming strategies like counting to 10, taking deep breaths, meditation, etc. Counseling may teach these things as well.

*Again, remember the strategies you use for students with EBD: behavior contracts, positive reinforcement, communication with families, etc.-a lot of these strategies will help students with ODD as well.

Good luck! I hope this helps!
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A little wait time
Old 08-02-2011, 05:45 AM
 
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I had a student who would initially seem like she wasn't going to do what I asked. But if I was patient and gave her a couple of minutes, she would comply on her own.

I agree with the pp too. And once you get to know the child, you will have a better understanding of what will work. Is it possibly to talk to last year's teacher or the parents before school starts? You might get the best ideas from them.

Good luck this year!
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Old 08-02-2011, 06:11 AM
 
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If you search on google for "ODD Disorder" or even "ODD Disorder in the classroom" I got a lot of websites that might help you.


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Son with ODD
Old 08-02-2011, 04:15 PM
 
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My son was diagnosed with ODD last year and it has been quite a challenge! However, now that we have meds. figured out, it's been amazing to spend time with him without any struggles!!! The previous posts are right on the money! Last year's teacher didn't build a relationship with him and he didn't work well for her, but when a student teacher arrived, she did build a relationship with him and he couldn't wait to see what she was going to be teaching each day! Keeping calm yourself is very helpful (although sometimes tough). The more your mood changes, so will his/hers. You will be surprised how things work out once you get to know your new student. Good luck for a great year!
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Pick your battles....
Old 08-02-2011, 08:31 PM
 
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A couple of years ago I had a student with ODD. Like the other PTs said, it's important to "build a relationship" with this student. Honestly, it was hard for me to do this. I'd even come in early, sit in "his" seat and say a prayer for this boy and ask God to give me guidance and patience.
He loved when I gave him "jobs" to do such as borrowing a book from another teacher (she knew why I would send him). The teacher even commented on how polite he was. This would happen with the office staff as well. Just remember, you will have good days and challenging days, and pick your battles. Some things are not worth the battle. You will have a great year and will grow to love (or just like) this child. I wish you well!
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Old 08-03-2011, 03:54 AM
 
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I would recommend doing an extensive review of his educational record to ensure he's had proper speech/language assessments and educational assessments, and also doing a lot of educational testing in the beginning of the year to determine his academic level. When I was taking a course on assessments, the instructor who was a PhD and had been assessing kids for years said sometimes kids were diagnosed as ODD had underlying language issues or academic issues. These kids would seem defiant b/c they couldn't understand the language and directions, and would also become defiant b/c everything at school was so difficult to them. They would just shut down. Obviously this is not the case for all ODD kids, but I think it's important to check. Also make sure he has had a comprehensive hearing test.

If all that checks out, is there a special education teacher or behavioral specialist in your district who could help you with writing up a behavior plan?
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Thank you! Thank you. Thank you!
Old 08-03-2011, 03:10 PM
 
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I really appreciate your helpful advice. That reminder of patience helps too. I do intend to bond with him right away. I also have learned in my career that most of the time my preconceived notions are usually wrong.
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