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chelseeuh chelseeuh is offline
 
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chelseeuh
 
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Gift and Talented First Grader with Major Attitude and Respect Issues
Old 04-17-2017, 06:41 PM
 
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This child is advanced to nearly a third grade level in math and reading. His writing skills are closer to average, mainly because he does not like to write and therefore gets less practice since he outright refuses to do many activities.
I've been working with his family all year on his social skills, which are much less mature that the average first grader at this time in the year.
His most problematic deficit is respecting his peers and teachers. He says things like "I'm not going to do that!" "You're a dumb baby!" "This is stupid, I'm not doing it, No way!" all the time.
His independent math and reading work is leveled and he mostly will complete it as long as he doesn't have to write too much.
He is difficult to have included in our whole group "mini-lessons" as he will purposely call out/yell out every answer that comes into his mind (most of them are correct as well).
We are a PBIS school, so tons of incentives are already in place. He was formerly on a individual behavior chart, but his parents wanted him weaned off. He did have some improvements, as he used to have major meltdowns, hide under tables, etc. in the fall.
Just 7 weeks left-----
I'm mainly looking for any feedback so I can meet with his family again and prepare his future second grade teacher for the ride.



Last edited by chelseeuh; 04-17-2017 at 07:02 PM.. Reason: spelling
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Old 04-17-2017, 07:00 PM
 
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That kid is a clone of my son, who is now in 6th grade. We have fewer issues now in middle school than we did in elementary. Boy Scouts has helped somewhat with the attitude. He may or may not respond to you telling him that the calling out steals other kids learning. I don't have any advice, we just muddled through each year. Being in gifted classes helped somewhat, but they tended to have more writing projects than the "regular" classes.
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PBIS suggestions
Old 04-18-2017, 04:02 PM
 
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Gifted kids are notorious for their asynchronous development. It's not surprising that his social skills lag behind his academics and I wouldn't be surprised if his social skills lag behind that of his gen ed peers.

For the last two years I've had a student similar to the one you describe. I'm the gifted specialist, so he's not in my room every day. I've had many a conversation with him about why the way he's behaving isn't nice, but this year he's been able to listen a bit more because he is seeing issues with friends as a result of his behavior.

I too work at a PBIS school. One of the things we've done this year, to add to our PBIS toolbox is to read Setting Limits in the Classroom. If you haven't already, I would suggest it - especially for next year's teacher. I think there's a parent version too.

The big thing that I would introduce in this case is giving the student limited choices. When he refuses to do an assignment - too much writing or not - you give him a choice of two things you can live with. "You can do it now or you can do it (at recess, during preferred activity time (from the book), for homework, during lunch, etc.) If he still refuses, "You can do it here or you can do it (in a buddy classroom). I haven't had to do this, but the book also has a blurt box - I can't remember the exact deal with that, but when he calls out, there's a consequence - I think he'd lose time from the preferred activity time.

The one thing I'm not very PBIS about is when my kids make other kids feel bad about how smart they are or the kid isn't. I try, I do, to give them choices - but I've found that asking them to apologize is a farce because they're not sorry and everyone knows it. Usually for the teasing, it's a stage one time out. I keep track of those and will send info home if a student is repeating the same behavior and ending up in time out. In my case the parents are aware and are working with him. It's just a much slower learning journey than his academics.
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chelseeuh chelseeuh is offline
 
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Thank you!
Old 04-18-2017, 07:16 PM
 
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Eliza,
Thank you for taking the time to respond! I just looked that book you suggested up on Amazon, there are two very similar titles.
Regarding the "choices you can live with", yes, this is very much a part of my regular classroom approach when managing students. With this particular child the choice frequently escalates to a meltdown when he is actually called to court and made to finish the work at recess/preferred activity time. I'm eager to read this book you have recommended and hopeful to find some strategies to enhance my general management of students who are "strong willed".

The mentioning of "time out" has my brain spinning for some more problem solving ideas. I'm meeting with his parent tomorrow and I'm thinking of trying out a "behavior contract" type set up with him. I will be specific with mom and the student that the inappropriate/mean language will be handled differently than other behaviors.

I'm so sleepy typing this out so if I sound like a hot mess that is all over the place, I apologize.
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Old 04-19-2017, 03:04 PM
 
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I agree choices are a life saver, but not when someone is being hurt be it physically or in this child's case emotionally. You get a consequence 1st time EVERY time. My little guy spent most of the first grading period in a meltdown, but now he's with the program 90+% of the time. Meltdowns don't work, and after me not budging despite a four hour tirade, he's realized there's no point.


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