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pinacolada pinacolada is offline
 
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phonemic awareness
Old 06-30-2020, 05:20 PM
 
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My sonís teacher said we should start doing beginning, middle, and ending sounds with him. He knows his letters, knows his letters sounds, and knows 50 high frequency words. However, he is having a lot of difficulty with identifying the beginning sound. Iím using the book ďPicture ThisĒ (similar to Words Their Way) with him because Iíve had a lot of success with it for my struggling readers. However, none of my struggling readers were autistic. The first sort is a bunch of pictures that start with letter m and letter s and youíre supposed to sort them according to the beginning sound.

Anyways, Iíve had students in the past who could read using phonics but couldnít identify the sounds that make up a word. So, their sense of phonemic awareness was never strong and they could never pass a phonemic awareness assessment, but they could still read and would build upon word patterns.

Is there anyone with any similar experiences or does anyone have any suggestions on how to approach this area?


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Old 06-30-2020, 05:52 PM
 
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Buy this book: https://equippedforreadingsuccess.com/

Equipped for Reading Success by David Kilpatrick

Then do the 1 minute drills in the back of the book every day. The starting level for your student is based on the results of the PAST screener. https://www.thepasttest.com/

I like to add in mouth work for sounds: https://i.pinimg.com/originals/3a/dc...c186a36f15.jpg

I use Wired for Reading which isn't very well known, but it presents the mouth sounds with lots of characters, skits, memory aids, and stories. For example to teach the consonant sounds we use the Zebra story. He gallops through the savanna making galloping sounds (p,t,k,ch) then goes over a wooden bridge (b,d,g,j) then he falls asleep, (f,th,s,z) rolls over and snores (v,th,z,zh), thinks about his day (m,n,ng) and then is so revitalized he races around a track making a doppler sound (l,r,l,r,l,r).

It sounds like you have lots of materials and games, but here's another resource with some games/center activities. https://fcrr.org/student-center-acti...nd-first-grade

The autism piece always adds an extra layer, so I hope something here will be helpful.
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Old 06-30-2020, 07:13 PM
 
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Have you used it with an autistic child?
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Old 06-30-2020, 07:18 PM
 
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No, I'm sorry. There's so much variety with kids who have autism. How does the autism manifest itself with your son?
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Old 06-30-2020, 07:20 PM
 
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I just finished taking an introductory course on learning how to teach phonemic awareness and reading. Our professor had us work from Put Reading First. The following is a research based literature with examples on how to teach phonemic awarenesses, includes phoneme isolation, blending, categorization, segmentation, manipulation, deletion, and addition.
I thought it might help you.

Put Reading First

https://lincs.ed.gov/publications/pdf/PRFbooklet.pdf


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Old 06-30-2020, 07:36 PM
 
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Programs like zoo phonics etc. overwhelm him. Although he is a visual learner, some of the material from the program you suggested would confuse him. If I write a word out like milk and leave out the letter m, so it's ___ilk he can tell me that the letter m goes in the blank but he cannot identify /m/ as the initial sound. Even for a word he has never seen before like mutation. I wrote out ___utation and he was able to move the /m/ card in it's place.
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Old 06-30-2020, 07:41 PM
 
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Thanks. It's very similar to Words Their Way and Picture This.
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Old 06-30-2020, 08:14 PM
 
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Take a look at Early Literacy Skill Builders from Attainment Company. It was designed for children with autism. It might be a really good fit for your child.

The program is very expensive for schools. I know there is a reduced price for families, I donít know how much it is. However, they have an app for tablets that is about $130 I believe. My understanding is that the app covers the full program. You will need to talk to the sales rep to be sure. There is a lite version of the app that is free that would let you try it out to see if your son responds well to it.
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Old 06-30-2020, 10:15 PM
 
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I've had so many kids on the spectrum that struggled with phonemic awareness, and yet were great readers (most above grade level). I don't have an answer, just want you to know that your son is not alone.
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Old 07-01-2020, 05:50 AM
 
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I see a lot of students in middle school who can read decently, but their lack of phonemic awareness becomes with spelling, especially when blends are involved. They have a lot of trouble with the concept of tapping out words / sounding them out.

Have you looked at the Florida Center for Reading Research? They have some center activites that you may be able to use.


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In my experience with autistic students
Old 07-01-2020, 09:03 AM
 
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phonemic awareness is often a problem. He is not unique in this regard. I have had students that could read pretty much anything put in front of them, but couldn't spell cat. I don't have any easy answers either.

Have you thought about focusing on the visual of what the mouth looks like when making the sound? Using a mirror and having him look and listen as he makes the sounds? Just a thought.

Elkonin boxes, taking away the letters completely and just focusing on the sounds might be another choice?
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Old 07-01-2020, 09:03 AM
 
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Have you tried using Elkonin boxes with him?

https://www.readingrockets.org/strategies/elkonin_boxes

You can use matchbox cars instead of cubes and have your son put a car in the garage for each sound.
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Old 07-01-2020, 10:35 AM
 
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I'm a K-5 reading specialist in a school that has an Autism inclusion program and I work with a few students from that program each year, in addition to literacy coaching w/the AU teacher to help her develop instruction for her students each year.

Equipped for Reading Success is an excellent resource and includes a chapter on how to actually teach phonemic awareness by starting with visuals and gradually working toward automaticity. Even if you don't use the one minute activities, it may be a useful resource for you. It also has suggestions for orthographic mapping activities, which would be beneficial as your child starts to encounter more complicated spelling patterns. (I don't know how old your son is so I'm assuming K/1st based on your description) I don't typically use ERS with primary grade intervention students. I prefer Heggerty's curriculum - there are free samples online you can look at and use if you want.

In my experience, when I work with students with AU that have phonemic awareness concerns (MOST elementary students who are struggling readers have deficits in PA whether they have Autism or not), the most common thing that I see is that the skill is difficult and they will refuse to engage in practice activities.

If you are trying to address b/m/e sound and phonemic awareness activities are not engaging, confusing, too much, triggering, stressful, etc. I would suggest word building and dictation activities. Those require PA segmenting to complete, but are more kinesthetic and concrete. In my groups, I teach the students to pound and tap the word (T: "cat", S: pound fist "cat", tap finger for each sound "/c/ /a/ /t/", T:"write each sound" - then depending on support needed, I may repeat the sounds they said as they write to help them remember).

From your post, it sounds like you might be struggling with whether this type of activity/focus is worth it since your child is doing fine so far. Research is overwhelming that poor phonemic awareness skills contribute to difficulty with spelling. It is not a 100% correlation, but is a pretty solid indicator of struggles with reading in the future. For those reasons, I would encourage you to keep working with your child to strengthen those areas. Your child's teacher is focused on prevention at this point, which is great and it's awesome that you can partner to support your child's literacy development.
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Fcrr
Old 07-03-2020, 11:01 AM
 
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The Florida Center for Reading Research is GREAT! (FCRR)
Start there and allow him to watch phonics videos on YOUTube.
That way he can dance and get active, not just sit in front of a screen all day.

FCRR
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