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Rudsinski Rudsinski is offline
 
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Rudsinski
 
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Not listening
Old 02-17-2012, 04:17 PM
 
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My class this year does not listen. I am contantly repeating directions. I have 2 autistic kids along with numberous ADHD kids. I realize these kids need directions repeated, but now it seems like the class is so used to having directions repeated that they feel they don't need to listen in the first place. Sometimes its seems like I have to repeat 5 and 6 times. When I tell the class that I won't repeat the directions they go home and tell their parents that I wouldn't tell them. I teach in a church based school so we are at the mercy of the parents. Any ideas?


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Altsports Altsports is offline
 
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Me too
Old 02-17-2012, 04:22 PM
 
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This is my class as well! It drives me batty!! I write it on the board too and if they ask for the 3-4th time I just point to the board without saying anything.
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MiamiEm324 MiamiEm324 is offline
 
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Ask 3 Before Me
Old 02-17-2012, 05:32 PM
 
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It may result in more student conversation which could create a whole separate issue, but I know teachers who have the "Ask 3 before me" rule. You could also consider giving each student an assigned buddy to ask if they missed directions. That way they are helping each other out and leaving you free to help others.

In general, have you tried asking the students to repeat directions back to you with a physical motion? Sometimes even something as simple as having students repeat the directions while "counting" on their fingers or mocking through the motions helps. Repeating in a silly voice helps too!

With some of my special needs students I found I have to directly teach them observation skills, just as I directly break down other social cues. When they ask me what we are working on I talk them through looking for someone reliable, articulating what they are doing, and then copying them. Of course then some students take that literally and mimic that student's every move : )
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1956BD 1956BD is offline
 
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Same problem
Old 02-17-2012, 06:21 PM
 
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I find that listening skills are on the decline. I'm sure there must be a logical reason for this. However, I have not figured out why. I have some theories though.

I believe students are very visual today due to computers, video games and television. So, I think written directions help.

I try to find activities that reinforce good listening skills, but am always looking for more.

I play Sparkle with my students to review spelling words. This requires they listen carefully.

Around Halloween the students design a unique jack-o-lantern and then write a description of their creation. The design is done in secret, so classmates do not see them. Then I display all their pumpkins when we are done. Each pupil reads their description. The others must listen carefully to identify the correct pumpkin. They listen attentively because they like the guessing game.

I found a listening comprehension math workbook some years ago. I read the problems and students have to write their answers. I do no repeats. It is really hard work and they hate the exercise at first. But, they do get better at the process.
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ConnieWI ConnieWI is offline
 
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Own Worst Enemies
Old 02-17-2012, 06:49 PM
 
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When we repeat directions for students, we are our own worst enemies. Once they know we will do this for them, they expect it and are rewarded when we do it. They get what they want...repeated directions, and we get what we do not want...baldness!!

As you give oral directions, write numbered cues/notes on the board.

When a child asks what to do, point to the board. You are going to have to be strong. If you give-in to one child, all others will expect you to give them directions too.

Another thing you can do when a child asks to have directions repeated is say "Why don't you walk around the room and see what your classmates are doing." Then turn away.

Using "ask three before me" is a great idea. When a child asks what to do, say "Have you asked three other students?" Then turn away.

The other thing you need to do is give an N (need improvement) for follows directions on the report card, and also write a comment about this problem in the comment section of each child's report card. This lets parents know their chid struggles with this skill. It can be a simple comment like:

James has difficulty following oral and written multi-step directions. He often asks me to repeat oral directions, and he often watches to see what other students are doing so he can find out what he should be doing. When giving multi-step directions at home, have James repeat them for you. This will help him be more attentive to what is required.


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gardenbug10 gardenbug10 is offline
 
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Great idea!
Old 02-17-2012, 06:57 PM
 
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I love your jack-o-lantern description idea! This could also be done with other holidays or art projects. I'm definitely doing this

We play Sparkle and they love it. They have to be quiet, listen, and make no noise when someone gets out or they are out. No exceptions! This really keeps their attention and they try really hard.

I also write the directions on the board for the visual learners and point when they ask, but it is amazing how many still can't follow the written directions. Allowing them to ask others helps our sanity too!
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Love Math 3 Love Math 3 is offline
 
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Sparkle
Old 02-18-2012, 03:47 PM
 
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How do you play Sparkle? I would like to try it?
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leasha1027 leasha1027 is offline
 
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use rewards
Old 02-18-2012, 06:53 PM
 
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Try giving a sticker or a couple of m&m's to one student who can summarize your directions for the class each time you give them for a while. Maybe the others will try really hard to listen so they can be called on and earn a reward.
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Bell Bell is offline
 
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Sparkle
Old 02-18-2012, 07:51 PM
 
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I, too, would like to know how to play Sparkle.
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1956BD 1956BD is offline
 
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Sparkle
Old 02-18-2012, 08:10 PM
 
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It is a new twist on a spelling bee. The students line up across the room facing the teacher. The teacher says the first word. The students spell the word out one letter at a time. The first person in line says the first letter. The second person in line says the second letter and so on. If a student does not know the next letter or says the wrong letter they are eliminated from the game and go sit at their desk.

When the students have finished spelling a word the next person in line says, "Sparkle". It is like a free pass and adds an element of chance to the game. The following student says, "bummer" and they are eliminated by chance.

Then the teacher says the next word for students to spell. Do not repeat the word. If they are not listening, then they will not be able to help spell the word.

Do not allow students to repeat the letter they said, for other students either. Everyone must listen carefully. They also need to speak loudly enough to be heard.

I also make my students stay in a straight line and face me. When I first started playing this game the line began to curve, so that the students were in a half circle. I realized they wanted visual clues by seeing the person saying the letter. I want them to rely on their auditory learning, not visual learning skills. So, I make them stay in a straight line facing me and not looking at the other students.

You keep playing until only one child is left standing. I allow that child to get a prize from the treasure chest. Then you are ready for another round.

I hope that makes sense. Have fun!


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