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MissAgnes MissAgnes is offline
 
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2 apples, a box of twinkies, 2 cinnamon rolls
Old 11-26-2019, 11:59 AM
 
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and some sort of neon yellow drink in a plastic water bottle. That's what one of my students brought for lunch. This 4th grader is already well on his wayt to diabetes before he's in high school.
I'm not letting him have it. Our school is 100% free lunch, so he's going to have to eat that. Ok, maybe the apples and ONE twinkie!


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Old 11-26-2019, 12:49 PM
 
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1/2 bag of potato chips
Slice of bread

That's an example of a lunch that a student used to bring. When I contacted the parents they said they were well aware of what he was bringing to school. They said it was his responsibility to make his lunch from the healthy options they had at home . He was just choosing to wait to the last minute and grab something on the way out the door each morning.

We confirmed the parent story with two older siblings in the same school ,and it was true. They were bringing healthy options ,and the student in my classroom was just being lazy.

Later he started bringing healthier options. I understand that this might be totally something different that's going on with your student though. Have you contacted the parents and the school nurse about your concerns? What did the student give for a reason?
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Ours are decent
Old 11-26-2019, 01:24 PM
 
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Mine seem to bring pretty healthy lunches to school. Their snacks arenít bad either. Very few of my students eat the school lunch, but those who do get quite a bit off the salad bar.
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MissAgnes MissAgnes is offline
 
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This is a first.
Old 11-26-2019, 02:13 PM
 
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He hasn't done this before. He normally just gets school lunch. I called grandma and she didn't know. I told him he could have his twinkies back at the end of the day.
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Old 11-26-2019, 02:15 PM
 
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One of my kids brought 2 donuts and a bag of chips. I told him that wasnít a lunch and he needed to get the school lunch (and I never get involved with lunches).


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Old 11-26-2019, 04:17 PM
 
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Packet of chocolate biscuits and a can of coke was a standard lunch for one girl I taught a few years ago. I amount of talking to parents would change it, and we didnít have another option to offer. She was a big girl and struggled to sit in and get up from the floor even at seven years old. I worry about her sometimes. Sheíd be fifteen or so now.
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Old 11-26-2019, 07:54 PM
 
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Daily beef jerky stick, little can of pringles and some kind of candy bar. Daily.

She's a very pretty girl, no weight issues, but someday...

A lot of the other kids eat the same kind of junk. I had a mom who insisted we let her kids eat candy for lunch because they didn't like anything else. They literally ate peanut butter cups and Takis. If they didn't have that, then they ate nothing, not even the free school lunch. How do people even survive on that?
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In my state
Old 11-27-2019, 07:35 AM
 
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The school lunches are little more than highly refined sugar in the form of bread, breaded meats, fruits, and desserts. There isn’t much of a nutritional difference between breaded meat, bread, or a candy bar.
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Salad Bar
Old 11-27-2019, 10:33 AM
 
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We actually have a pretty decent salad bar. The video Iíll link shows how it operates. The video isnít my building, but itís the same across the county. On the occasion I donít take my lunch I donít mind buying from the salad bar at school. The options change, so it isnít the same every day.

We donít have school wide free lunch so many do pack, but those who eat school lunch seem to take quite a bit from the salad bar.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=eM0ksk7s2uY
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Old 11-27-2019, 02:23 PM
 
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I feel like we have all seen lunches like you describe-It makes me crazy. BUT I always ask myself if it could be something more. When my own son started refusing most foods I wasnt sure what else to do, is this a possibility here?

When my son was little (k) his teacher made an award for him/me - "healthiest lunches". Now that he is bigger I think I would get the "worst lunches ever" award. I send the few things that he will eat cold-donuts holes and apple sauce and string cheese and he used to eat beef jerky but he wont even eat that anymore so we are down to 3 items. He will eat hot foods all day long and he makes himself an egg and bacon breakfast sandwich as soon as he comes home-but with his bus ride its a 9.5 hour day which is too long to go without eating at all. I am no happier about it than anyone, but its better for him to eat something than eat nothing and then act out from being hungry and they stopped allowing me to have hot food delivered to school. Call the parents, maybe they are doing the best they can.

Food can be a very complicated issue where long held beliefs like , "he'll eat what you tell him to eat if he's hungry enough", just arent true for every kid. Some kids (mine included) will actually make themselves sick "restricting food" and when you push the issue it can just make it so much WORSE. My son developed Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder, just incase you might want to look into it. Here is a blurb about it

Quote:
DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA

According to the DSM-5, ARFID is diagnosed when:

An eating or feeding disturbance (e.g., apparent lack of interest in eating or food; avoidance based on the sensory characteristics of food; concern about aversive consequences of eating) as manifested by persistent failure to meet appropriate nutritional and/or energy needs associated with one (or more) of the following:
Significant weight loss (or failure to achieve expected weight gain or faltering growth in children).
Significant nutritional deficiency.
Dependence on enteral feeding or oral nutritional supplements.
Marked interference with psychosocial functioning.
The disturbance is not better explained by lack of available food or by an associated culturally sanctioned practice.
The eating disturbance does not occur exclusively during the course of anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa, and there is no evidence of a disturbance in the way in which oneís body weight or shape is experienced.
The eating disturbance is not attributable to a concurrent medical condition or not better explained by another mental disorder. When the eating disturbance occurs in the context of another condition or disorder, the severity of the eating disturbance exceeds that routinely associated with the condition or disorder and warrants additional clinical attention.

RISK FACTORS

As with all eating disorders, the risk factors for ARFID involve a range of biological, psychological, and sociocultural issues. These factors may interact differently in different people, which means two people with the same eating disorder can have very diverse perspectives, experiences, and symptoms. Researchers know much less about what puts someone at risk of developing ARFID, but hereís what they do know:

People with autism spectrum conditions are much more likely to develop ARFID, as are those with ADHD and intellectual disabilities.
Children who donít outgrow normal picky eating, or in whom picky eating is severe, appear to be more likely to develop ARFID.
Many children with ARFID also have a co-occurring anxiety disorder, and they are also at high risk for other psychiatric disorders.


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MissAgnes MissAgnes is offline
 
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I am familiar with this.
Old 11-27-2019, 03:03 PM
 
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I have a son on the spectrum who also has ADHD and a mood disorder. He had food issues when he was younger.
I also have extensive experience with children on the spectrum, and other special issues. I am more aware than most of the staff at my school on these issues, and I am always very cognizant of what the child needs.
This child has no food issues, no underlying contributing factors for ARFID. He ususally eats whatever is there with no problem. This was just an instance of him packing a lunch on sly with junk.
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Old 11-28-2019, 08:04 AM
 
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Well if thats not what it is and he will happily eat what the school provides than just holding back the junk for parent pick up seems like a good plan.

I feel like I have been driven through the mud this year over donut holes (and my son goes to a special nonpublic school for kids with disabilities so you would think they know ARFID as well but...) So now I feel compelled to always suggest...hey maybe mom isn't horrible, maybe this is a a bigger issue. Thats more a reflection on me than the current situation though
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I see a lot of that
Old 11-28-2019, 03:21 PM
 
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I sub in two districts now, but did 4 more previously. I did a few really rough title 1 schools where the school lunches were really awful, but it was the primary meal for most kids, so they suffered through it. another school in that district is more upscale, but the same tasteless food, so the kids bring a lot of lunches from home, and often it was junk with a soda.

I sub in a district now that has decided not to participate in the federal school lunch program, the food is akin to applebees, or shoneys I don't see many brought from home lunches there. lunch the other day was thanksgiving and it was pretty good, the smell wafted through the building for an hour before our lunch... it made my kiddos pretty hungry, and the after effect was calming...lol like today (thanksgiving day) previous days they had stewed cherries with rice, and roasted chicken breasts with four different seasoning choices. I need to sub there more I think...

another local high school has returned to their old system where four or five local restaurants lease hot table space in a large buffet area that has been dormant for the past 10 years. sadly I don't sub there anymore. its an international baccalaureate school so its five different world cultures of food in there
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Old 12-01-2019, 04:04 AM
 
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I guess I am surprised at how many teacher's would take a home brought lunch away from a student! I don't feel like it is my job to tell my students what they can and cannot eat.

Yes, I understand that is not a healthy choice, but I would not deny a child food they brought from home.

I would definitely have a talk, or teach about nutrition to my class and encourage good choices. Last year I had a boy who brought a large bag of Doritos, Tasty Cakes , and a sugary drink for snack each day. I talked to him and it turns out, they were always running late so they picked up his snack at a corner store each morning and he got to pick out what he wanted. During conferences his parents asked for some strategies or tips on what he should bring for snack.

There are so many reasons why a child may bring a certain lunch including:
* They packed their own lunch and grabbed what they wanted
* Prepackaged foods are a lot cheaper and easier than fresh foods
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1 of my most memorable food stories
Old 12-01-2019, 11:03 AM
 
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A spoiled rotten girl came to class 30 minutes late with a HUGE doughnut smothered with chocolate frosting.
She walked in w/ it and sat down to eat it during reading group. I told her to put it away. She insisted it was her breakfast and got really huffy when I made her put it in a bag to have after lunch.
Of course, her mom got mad at me for not letting her eat her "breakfast". To me, if you are already 30 minutes late, eat the doughnut in the car if that is what you get, but don't bring it in class. ( The other kids were drooling! lol)
She's of age now, a heroin addict, and prostitute. She has been in and out of jail.
I am not saying a doughnut for breakfast will do that to a kid, but the way the parents let her do whatever she wanted probably played a huge role in it. Parents need to be parents , not friends. Also, they need to be less concerned w/ their kids immediate happiness and teach them about delayed gratification.
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IF there wasn't an alternative
Old 12-02-2019, 10:01 AM
 
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I wouldn't have taken it away.
He almost always eats school lunch (free), so this was an anomaly. And I do feel it's my job to help students be as successful as possible. Filling up with sugar is not going to help a child be successful in school.
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