What will next year look like? - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      The VENT

What will next year look like?

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
kindergirl88 kindergirl88 is offline
 
Joined: Dec 2012
Posts: 27
New Member

kindergirl88
 
Joined: Dec 2012
Posts: 27
New Member
What will next year look like?
Old 04-28-2020, 06:34 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

I’m just curious if any of your school districts have discussed ideas for what will happen if we can’t return right away in the fall? Or ideas for if we are able to return but have to make major changes to our day to day to have more social distancing?
My district is hoping we can start on time in August but is going to be coming up with several different plans just in case.
I’ve always dreamed that we could have smaller class sizes - this year I had almost 30 K students but not sure smaller classes would even be a possibility.


kindergirl88 is offline   Reply With Quote

Haley23 Haley23 is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 8,264
Senior Member

Haley23
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 8,264
Senior Member

Old 04-28-2020, 07:04 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

All I know is that our district is working on making scenarios- if ___ happens, then we will _____. I'm sure they won't share those with us but I would love to know. My P says she is hopeful we return but "it won't be the same" and also said that we would be getting information later rather than sooner- they don't want to announce something and then have to go back on it if the virus news changes.

Personally I think all of the "social distancing" school scenarios I've heard (students come half day, students attend every other day, etc.) are nuts and I don't see how it works at all. Then again, missing an entire quarter of school is also nuts, and we've done that. Who knows what we will learn to put up with in our "new normal."
Haley23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sbkangas5's Avatar
Sbkangas5 Sbkangas5 is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 7,565
Senior Member

Sbkangas5
 
Sbkangas5's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 7,565
Senior Member

Old 04-28-2020, 07:50 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

Ours has talked about staggered schedules and changing recesses/lunch/pe so that big groups of kids aren't out at the same time. Other than that nothing definitive has been said other than it will look different.
Sbkangas5 is offline   Reply With Quote
SubMan SubMan is offline
 
Joined: Feb 2013
Posts: 1,673
Senior Member

SubMan
 
Joined: Feb 2013
Posts: 1,673
Senior Member

Old 04-28-2020, 10:18 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

Whatís been discussed in one of the districts where I sub is what is being called a hybrid model. Where half the students come on day and the other half come the next day. The off days would have them staying at home working on assignments given on the days when they were in school.

Not sure what would happen if a student misses a day; would they be allowed to come on their off day? The district is already on a four day rotation for specials; art, gym, library, music at the elementary level.
SubMan is offline   Reply With Quote
ZipLine's Avatar
ZipLine ZipLine is online now
 
Joined: May 2009
Posts: 6,879
Senior Member

ZipLine
 
ZipLine's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2009
Posts: 6,879
Senior Member

Old 04-29-2020, 05:28 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

Quote:
Where half the students come on day and the other half come the next day. The off days would have them staying at home working on assignments given on the days when they were in school.
I canít imagine how working parents would handle that.


ZipLine is online now   Reply With Quote
KatieViolet's Avatar
KatieViolet KatieViolet is offline
 
Joined: Jan 2011
Posts: 3,609
Senior Member

KatieViolet
 
KatieViolet's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2011
Posts: 3,609
Senior Member

Old 04-29-2020, 05:40 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

And what about families with multiple children? Will it be arranged that the whole family all attends in the same day? Or will different grade levels go on different days? It is a scheduling nightmare.
KatieViolet is offline   Reply With Quote
Hammy6714 Hammy6714 is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2017
Posts: 138
Full Member

Hammy6714
 
Joined: Nov 2017
Posts: 138
Full Member
Zipline
Old 04-29-2020, 05:55 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

Teachers are also working parents and If we had to do A days and B days we would also have to find child care for our children..would it be difficult yes, but would we make it work, yes. We have to remember that the health and well being of the students and the teachers and staff is just as important as school at this point. We can't teach them if they aren't alive....dark thoughts I know but it's the truth.
Hammy6714 is offline   Reply With Quote
Hawkeyegirl1 Hawkeyegirl1 is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2016
Posts: 263
Full Member

Hawkeyegirl1
 
Joined: Aug 2016
Posts: 263
Full Member
And who's going to deep clean?
Old 04-29-2020, 07:37 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #8

I want to be back at school, too. But, if we stagger kids, or use a hybrid model....who is going to do the deep cleaning/sanitation after the day is done? Teachers? I don't think so. Our poor custiodial staff who have so much on their plates during the regular year?

And, I've been thinking about handwashing next year. It seems like such a small thing, but it took FOREVER for 23 kids to wash their hands this year, and that was a pretty quick wash...nothing like what they will need to be doing. I'll need to schedule in a whole chunk of our schedule for handwashing. Kidding. But not kidding.
Hawkeyegirl1 is offline   Reply With Quote
AspenRed's Avatar
AspenRed AspenRed is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2020
Posts: 119
Full Member

AspenRed
 
AspenRed's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2020
Posts: 119
Full Member

Old 04-29-2020, 09:02 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #9

Nothing has been discussed about next year in my district. The school board is hiring a new superintendent tonight. Our current one is retiring, so everything is in limbo. Though they are planning to furlough 14 teachers in the district, which is 23% of our teaching staff. So, that may make it hard to provide smaller classes.
AspenRed is offline   Reply With Quote
Raychell
 
 
Guest

Raychell
 
 
Guest
Must go back
Old 04-29-2020, 09:09 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #10

The year has to start normally. Working parents (including teachers) will not be able to make crazy adjustments work nor should they have to, it is what it is. There is no way what we are doing now will continue into the new school year.


  Reply With Quote
Fractured Fractured is offline
 
Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 572
Senior Member

Fractured
 
Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 572
Senior Member

Old 04-29-2020, 09:15 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #11

Just looking at it from high schools where I workóI donít see anything working. There are a few new high schools that have bigger classrooms in some places, but most of them are still in old buildings with small classrooms. But I think there are too many kids to do the staggered schedule either way. There are still the questions of buses, passing periods, dismissals and times when kids will be unable to social distance.

We wonít have tests by then, or they will be expensive. Who performs them and reads the results? Also, every school is not going to be able to have masks- do they expect us to wear a mask for 8 hours? Are the kids going to wear them? They will still be in short supply in August. A school of 1000 kids would probably need 1000+ masks a day for half the students and faculty, and thatís a low estimate.



Wipes will still be in short supply and sanitizer. Bathrooms are going to be overrun with people washing their hands. Are we going to have janitors cleaning the bathrooms a few times a day?

Temperature taking seems pointless. Again, who will do that for hundreds of kids? Us? Office staff? It would take hours to take temps of hundreds of kids.

This doesnít even take into account kids who need paras or students who canít go to the bathroom on their own.

Everything points to online teaching again. We all know we will have a second spike in fall/winter, so whatís the point of doing all this for two months and risking the chance of infection? Schools wonít have money for any of these supplies even if they are available( and they wonít be).
Fractured is offline   Reply With Quote
southernfried southernfried is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Posts: 431
Senior Member

southernfried
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Posts: 431
Senior Member

Old 04-29-2020, 09:57 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #12

My husband is also a teacher and we both love planning/data, so this is a frequent topic around our house.


To me, I think we need to approach it with two big questions:

1. What is the capacity of people we can safely have in the building at this time? It may be that in August, it's not safe for anyone to come in. Or it may be safe for 10%, 25%, 50% of the kids to be there at once. (I don't think there's any scenario where it's safe for more than 50% of the kids to be there at one time.)

2. What are our goals, from most important to least? Why are we reopening the buildings? Is our main goal to feed children and provide childcare for working parents? To provide equity for kids without internet? To stay in compliance with IEPs? To offer all students the opportunity for in-person learning?

From there, plans can be made based on capacity and goals. If it's only safe to bring in a fourth of the kids at a time, is it better to have kids come one day a week? Or to have my neediest 6-7 kids come 4 days a week and the rest of the class rotate through coming once a month on Fridays? Or do we temporarily re-assign more teachers to primary grades and aim to get kindergarten students in the building 3 days a week, while 5th graders might only come once?


Most importantly, I think we will all have to come to terms with "Maslow before Blooms". The function of schools for the next year or two may have more to do with meeting basic needs than with doing high-level work. And yeah, it sucks. It really, really sucks. But it won't magically be safe to come to school just because we want it to be. (And I know I'm preaching to the choir here)

For me personally, I am preparing (mentally and in real life) to teach fully online next year. If I'm sitting in my classroom with a group of kids, awesome, but we will still be doing that pre-planned, online work. We'll supplement that online work with activities that can only be done in person, and the students will have the added benefit of a college-educated adult in the room to help them, but my primary goal for next year is planning a simple, streamlined, basic curriculum that can be done anywhere, anytime.
southernfried is offline   Reply With Quote
southernfried southernfried is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Posts: 431
Senior Member

southernfried
 
Joined: Nov 2010
Posts: 431
Senior Member

Old 04-29-2020, 10:04 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #13

Meant to add... one idea my husband and I threw around today that we hadn't seen elsewhere...

If (when) we're doing online learning in the fall, take the first weeks of school and do 2-day "boot camp" orientations. Have VERY small groups of students - like 4-5 kids per room - come in for 2 days of school. Get their devices, form the beginnings of a relationship, do simple placement tests if needed, get them set up with books and printed materials, explain procedures and workflow, then send them on their way. Take a day off to deep clean the room, run another 2-day orientation. It might take a month to get through all the students, but from there school could move online as much as needed.
southernfried is offline   Reply With Quote
Fractured Fractured is offline
 
Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 572
Senior Member

Fractured
 
Joined: Jan 2018
Posts: 572
Senior Member

Old 04-29-2020, 10:15 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #14

Aspen- why are they doing that? Are they eliminating elective teachers or are they preparing to have a slashed budget?


Southern fried- these are some very good points. The execution of them all sounds horrible though. I donít think Iím going to be able to get a full time teaching job due to budget cuts. Iím not even sure subbing will be needed that much next year. Definitely not feeling good about the state of my prospects amid everything else going on.
Fractured is offline   Reply With Quote
ZipLine's Avatar
ZipLine ZipLine is online now
 
Joined: May 2009
Posts: 6,879
Senior Member

ZipLine
 
ZipLine's Avatar
 
Joined: May 2009
Posts: 6,879
Senior Member
Hammy
Old 04-30-2020, 02:54 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #15

Quote:
Teachers are also working parents and If we had to do A days and B days we would also have to find child care for our children..
Yes, they are. Every working parent regardless of what they do was included in my thinking. Not sure why you would assume otherwise. I have 2 nieces who are teachers and both have young children- one has three kids and the other four with the oldest being a 3rd grader.

Another poster stated several valid questions regarding the staggered day plan:
Quote:
And what about families with multiple children? Will it be arranged that the whole family all attends in the same day? Or will different grade levels go on different days? It is a scheduling nightmare.

Oh, my. I’m not sure how stating a fact regarding the difficulty to handle child care on staggered school days leads to assumptions that teachers and children be sacrificed and allowed to die. That’s quite a leap:
Quote:
We have to remember that the health and well being of the students and the teachers and staff is just as important as school at this point. We can't teach them if they aren't alive....dark thoughts I know but it's the truth.
ZipLine is online now   Reply With Quote
mrsf70's Avatar
mrsf70 mrsf70 is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 425
Senior Member

mrsf70
 
mrsf70's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 425
Senior Member

Old 04-30-2020, 04:28 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #16

We have a staff Zoom today to discuss plans in place to end the year May 22. We also had "schedules" sent out for next year, based on a normal school model. I'm wondering if the Zoom is to address what admin is discussing going forward.
mrsf70 is offline   Reply With Quote
Hammy6714 Hammy6714 is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2017
Posts: 138
Full Member

Hammy6714
 
Joined: Nov 2017
Posts: 138
Full Member
Zipline
Old 04-30-2020, 04:23 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #17

I didn't mean any disrespect with my comment about teachers having children and having to find child care if we went to school on A and B days. I was just stating that society sometimes forgets or looks over the fact that teachers also have families and situations such as half days or alternate days also requires them to make arrangements.

I have two children as well and would have to find childcare if we did a schedule like that...it would be hard but we would figure it out!
Hammy6714 is offline   Reply With Quote
Song of Joy Song of Joy is online now
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 2,791
Senior Member

Song of Joy
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 2,791
Senior Member

Old 04-30-2020, 05:43 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #18

So, if the 20-21 school year ends up being totally online with distance learning, what would prevent districts or even states from having a core of online personalities to teach each grade/subject? There could be a lesson planning team and then the remaining teachers could reach out to kids to do small group Zoom learning without having to put on videos and performances. The online teachers could have technical help for recording, props, backgrounds, etc. and the classroom could be populated with a small group of studio students. Someone could work on awesome links for further learning.

The sad part is if the building is empty for a year, there would be a reduced need for janitors, bus drivers, and most aides. Electricity, water and sewer would be less, and maybe the savings could be put toward devices for each student.

Personally, I'd rather see schools open and figure out alternate plans for vulnerable students and staff.
Song of Joy is online now   Reply With Quote
Haley23 Haley23 is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 8,264
Senior Member

Haley23
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 8,264
Senior Member

Old 04-30-2020, 05:53 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #19

Quote:
So, if the 20-21 school year ends up being totally online with distance learning, what would prevent districts or even states from having a core of online personalities to teach each grade/subject?
I had mentioned this in another thread, but I think the thing that's saving us from this right now is that districts don't know this for sure. They are hoping to open up for "real" school- right now in August, and I'm hearing "worst case scenario" is January. They can't say right now that we're going to be all online, so they can't just get rid of all of those people. Even if we're not open in August, they're still going to be monitoring with the hope of opening in 1-2 months, and that cycle will just continue. Even if we do end up being online all year (I really hope this doesn't happen) there is no way to know that up front or event throughout the year- there will always be a hope of being able to open in 1-2 months. There will be pressure from the government and community to open because people can't really get back to work if schools aren't open.

As far as saving on utilities, I've heard it's not really happening, at least for us. The district is spending so much on food, fixing devices, new tech, and wifi hotspots that it far surpassed the utility savings costs. We have some lights in our buildings that are on 24/7 (don't ask me why- maybe perceived safety reasons) and I have wondered if those lights are on even now.
Haley23 is offline   Reply With Quote
mrsf70's Avatar
mrsf70 mrsf70 is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 425
Senior Member

mrsf70
 
mrsf70's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2007
Posts: 425
Senior Member

Old 05-01-2020, 03:39 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #20

I learned yesterday the state is requiring all districts to submit a plan for social distancing in schools in the fall. If no plan is submitted, districts will be required to be completely remote next year. This makes sense to be prepared no matter what the situation come August.
mrsf70 is offline   Reply With Quote
rdtrtrstg
 
 
Guest

rdtrtrstg
 
 
Guest

Old 05-01-2020, 11:36 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #21

The most likely scenario is schools just half assing social distancing measures in the building that might look OK on paper but in reality don't mean anything. You can't do social distancing inside a school building with normal occupancy on a normal school day. It's not possible. There isn't enough room to separate desks or stagger lunch times, without having only say, half the school come in on any given day (which I'd be cool with!)
  Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
The VENT
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 09:42 AM.

Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net