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Will subbing even be a viable occupation for next year?

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Fractured Fractured is offline
 
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Will subbing even be a viable occupation for next year?
Old 04-29-2020, 10:04 AM
 
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This is long—-So I’m just thinking about the future. I’m again applying for full time teaching jobs, but that market doesn’t look so good. Thinking ahead to next year: we all have seen the talk about how classrooms and schools will look different, but if you spend anytime thinking about it, you know it probably won’t be. Schools aren’t going to have the money or resources for all the supplies to be safe.

I was also just thinking of the need for subs is going to basically get to the point where there are much more subs than jobs. If they go to half days or staggered classes, I feel that teachers would be much less willing to take days off so they don’t get behind. I feel like the days of worksheets and work days would no longer be something admin wants teachers to leave as plans. And if they go to a four day schedule that is less chance to work. Or if they do half days at school and half online.


Then there is the whole getting kids back in the routine of things. I can’t imagine how it will be for regular teachers, but it’s going to be hard to get kids back in a classroom and listening to them and following directions and expectations after 3 months of online school and a few months of a wasted summer for these kids because they will probably have to be indoors or not have many places to go. They didn’t listen to us before, what will it be like now? I really dread having to practice classroom management in this scenario as it usually never worked before. I just see a lot of checked out kids, even more so than before.


Sept is usually a dead month for subbing anyway. So when a second spike hits, maybe we have one or two months of spotty work before we go back to all online schooling. That brings me to my last thought- do you even want to be in different schools every day at the height of influenza season AND the virus? I tried not to think about it too much, but I was convinced I was going to get sick the last week before schools closed because there were barely any wipes or sanitizer and no one was social distancing.

Why do I want to get sick for low pay and no health benefits and no paid time off?

Just thinking about all this and I’m not looking forward to any of these scenarios. Anyone have thoughts?


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Old 04-29-2020, 11:21 AM
 
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i don't have an answer for you but i have definitely been thinking about this. i'm okay right now because i can live on my tax return for awhile, but i planned to get another year of work before slowing down for master's stuff. if we don't get work, i won't have that to get me through next summer. and there are no food stamps for grad students in this state who aren't also working minimum 20 hrs a week.

i have been wondering if i just need to find different work, but i have never had luck in this area due to stuff i won't discuss here. i can think of some work i could do, but it will be front line, much higher risk than subbing.

i never get sick because i'm crazy paranoid with handwashing and sanitizer already - i see teachers dropping like flies around me every year, and i also see that they come into the lounge and don't wash hands.

but covid is different - way more contagious. as a sub, i'm not one to sit at the desk, and given bad hearing and eyesight i get close to kids and close to their desks. i can't get sick, i can't get my own kids sick, i can't get my mom sick. so yeah, i'm concerned.

like you, i'm not convinced subbing will be viable. or if it is, we should be prepared for it to be a high risk situation.

on the vent thread, one poster had some interesting ideas about what school could look like next year. none of those scenarios seem like they will require subs, except maybe longer days with staggered schedules. is the district willing to pay me for 10+ hr days? or would i just operate on one schedule per job?

the fact is that we're looking at great depression levels of unemployment. i think the govt. is going to have to look at MAJOR CHANGES to support people's basic needs. but i suspect things will have to get really bad first before people demand that of political leaders.

just my thoughts
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Old 04-29-2020, 11:57 AM
 
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Sorry this has thrown a wrench into your plans. Did you want to get a MAT or something education related?

Yes, I am also really conscious of germs. I donít eat any thing like chips or snacks where I would have to be touching a surface and then going back to the bag. This has kept me healthy but I still get the occasional cold.

I keep thinking about a girl on the last day of class. She came right up to ask me if I had taken attendance yet and I said no. She coughed right in my face after half attempting to cover it up and ended up ditching the class. We take attendance on a computer so they are always trying to look at it and there was no way to move away from her as I was at a standing desk by the wall.

I think kids will have to observe social distancing. If they donít, I will probably lose my cool. I canít even imaging having to repeat 50 times to stand back from others. And then throw in the phones and it sounds like a nightmare. I donít see the 10 hour days happening. Having sections of the school come on difft days seems the most likely. I canít stop thinking about it, and none of the scenarios seem good.

I think it will come down to we need to get the economy moving and kids donít seem to get as sick. I think the govt and admin will not really care if we get sick or not and look to hire younger people, if anyone is actually going to want to be in schools.

I also agree about the govt assistance. I havenít gotten unemployment or the stimulus check yet, and they will need to fork over more if there isnít going to be work. And get it done more efficiently.
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Old 04-29-2020, 12:05 PM
 
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I think that too much time on our hands leads to a lot of us having negative prognoses for the future; too negative, I think. Once the virus gets under control, I see things going back to normal. The problem is that we don't know how long that will take.

If I had to survive on just subbing, I would be looking elsewhere. This won't work, in my opinion. Unemployment doesn't last forever.

I still think it is a teachers' market, since some teachers that were on the fence are quitting because of the virus.

I am anxiously waiting to hear from my school about the job, but it is an actual teaching job, with contract, tenure-track, etc. Even though a teachers' market, to me, I would not wait for a long-term sub job, either, if I were relying on subbing. Honestly, I'd get out. I don't think it's looking good with all that is going on. My opinion.
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Old 04-29-2020, 12:27 PM
 
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They just aren’t even posting many jobs where I am. I think there will be cuts over new hiring. My friend is an art teacher and thinks she’s going to get laid off. Schools are taking down full time jobs and replacing them with half time or dual subject jobs. Or they are listing the jobs as “ possible opening.” Even if I signed a contract, I wouldn’t be 100 percent sure I would still actually have that job going into the school year as budgets and protocol for the virus might change. We could get furloughed any time. Too many variables to think about, but it’s hard to just apply for jobs and totally put it out of your mind. A teacher on vent board in the what will school look like thread said they are cutting 14 teachers, or 23 percent of her district. If that is how it’s going to be, I don’t feel good about my prospects.

As for the govt, if we only have the same job options now as we do in the fall, they will have to keep up the benefits if they want people to continue to be able to live and pay rent.


Also, good luck on the job.


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Old 04-29-2020, 12:39 PM
 
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I think that new teachers would have the same contract as "old" teachers. I can't imagine a union allowing that.

You do have me thinking that they may be leery about hiring new teachers, though.

My understanding is that the schools have been paid in full during this time, but I don't know for sure. They are doing their best to teach, so I would think they would still get paid. Public schools, anyway.
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Old 04-29-2020, 12:49 PM
 
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I just mean that you can sign a contract but I donít think itís a guarantee of employment. My friend already signed her contract for next year, but it doesnít guarantee her an actual position at that school. If they cut her position, she would ideally be put in another school where they were missing an art teacher, but if they are cutting all of those positions, she is SOL.

Iím not sure what a union does to protect a first year teacher. There is probably a buy out clause or something, but I canít imagine they would be on the hook to pay you your full salary for the year. Iím saying you get a job now and come September they have less kids coming and just donít have the job for you, or they just donít have the money. If they can prove that to the union, I donít see why they would have to keep you on.
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They already sent out the assurance letters!!
Old 04-29-2020, 03:05 PM
 
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I just received and signed my LRA letter to be a substitute for next year. The LRA expires may 30th, and if you do not sign it you are fired as a substitute, so you must sign it. As of now, I am receiving unemployment due to a letter of recommendation Not stating a pandemic as part of a reasoning for substitutes to not get on employment. In fact, even for next year, there is no clause for this. Can I just file for unemployment once again next year if this happens again? We are scheduled to return August 28th.
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Old 04-29-2020, 05:49 PM
 
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Very interesting discussion. What about those small classrooms, used by special education teachers, that are only large enough for a small number of students? These rooms have a round table or two, with teacher and students in very close proximity. For the last year, I've refused these subbing jobs. There's no place to move away from sick students.

Sometimes classroom teachers ask subs to work closely with a small group of students at a front or back table. When those students are constantly coughing and blowing their noses, again there's no place to escape.

I've been teaching for over 40 years and have seen a lot, but nothing even close to this. It's almost impossible to predict what will happen. Fortunately for me, my teaching career is almost over, but I really feel for those younger than me who really need this income.

Last edited by c6g; 04-30-2020 at 06:22 AM..
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Old 04-30-2020, 12:32 AM
 
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If schools are back in person, even if it's not full time, I think there will be a huge demand for subs. I think the days where it's acceptable to come to work sick and power through it because you don't want to deal with being out are long gone. In the past people may have frowned on it- now I think you'd be told to go home. There's also some talks about temperature checks, which would again mean more people being sent home. People will be staying home for minor illnesses that they previously would have just worked through.

I think we'll be open in some capacity even if it is not a full, "normal" schedule. I don't see how they can continue this online thing for an entire additional year.


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Old 04-30-2020, 03:42 AM
 
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Haley- I’m not as convinced we will be in high demand. At districts I work in, there are more subs than jobs at schools people are willing to work at. Maybe people would be willing to sub for elementary and schools with bad reputations, but I don’t think I’d do either of those. I only do high school now. I’d go back to middle school, but I wouldn’t sub for elementary, esp in a pandemic.

As I said, I could see schools opening with all of these feeble attempts at safety, but you know the virus will come roaring back. If one student gets infected they will have to close the whole school for at least a few weeks to deep clean it( this is what they were doing before schools stopped here and went online). I assume the whole school would revert to online learning at that point. It just comes back to nothing will stop this from spreading, and it’s easier for schools to stay online. I think some will try going back to a normal schedule but it won’t last. I know nobody wants to hear about going online until January, but it makes the most sense. Parents also want their kids in school so they can work, but if kids are getting sick and infecting their parents, that tune will also change.

Last edited by Fractured; 04-30-2020 at 05:51 AM..
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Old 04-30-2020, 05:04 AM
 
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Haley and Fractured, both of you are presenting very realistic scenarios. Using the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic and past polio outbreaks as guides, I think the 2020-2021 school year will be unlike any we've had in at least 65 years.

Haley, you might be right about temperature checks and everything that goes along with them. Schools are always quick to jump on every bandwagon that comes along, and administrators might require temperature checks and then boast they're doing everything possible to keep students and staff safe. Under your scenario--a very realistic one--there could be a huge demand for subs.

The big question is what happens after that. As we all know, educational policy is filled with contradictions. As the COVID-19 situation improves, strict policies will be relaxed. Administrators will be under pressure to contain costs, but they'll continue to stress that they're doing everything possible to keep everyone safe. Teachers will be told to limit their absences, while at the same time, they'll be told not to come to school if they're sick. Yes, school administrators and educational policy-makers will continue to do what they've always done, speaking out of both sides of their mouths.

Fractured, your scenario is also quite possible. Many parents and students are tired of online learning. After a long summer with kids at home, camps closed, and no vacations, schools will feel some pressure to try to reopen. They might do just that while making some feeble attempts at safety. There's no doubt that some schools will do this better than others. If the disease does come roaring back, we could very well be right back where we started.

Here's some interesting reading about past pandemics.

https://www.baltimoresun.com/marylan...ujq-story.html

https://www.npr.org/sections/npr-his...alyzed-america

Last edited by c6g; 04-30-2020 at 06:23 AM..
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Old 04-30-2020, 06:04 AM
 
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Still pondering all of this. Looking at how states are opening up at different levels, it will probably be this way for schools as well. I know places like Texas and Georgia are going to see a sudden spike in cases. I donít care what anyone says, getting a haircut or a tattoo or going to sit in a movie theater is going to spread the disease. Will these states then close back up or just continue ignoring science and health officials? Will this push schools to go online? Will places like Nyc even risk going back to school?

Thatís too hard to predict, as most of this is. Best case scenario, all schools open at the same time and make some attempt to social distance and have staggered classes or half online/half in person classes. We go back to work, parents go back to work, the economy starts creaking along again. Some people will choose to stay at home.


No matter what, you will see people at schools get sick and some will have to close down to clean. Even if schools makes it to December, the second spike will come along at some point. Maybe Xmas break will become a month. Bad weather will also play into this. If a school is going to have heavy snow, it just makes sense to go virtual. All of the weather centers are also predicting this to be one of the worst hurricane seasons ever, with 16 to 20 hurricanes being the estimate. Then letís thrown in flu season and how people usually get colds and other things at that time of year. Itís just a disaster, even in a ďbest caseĒ scenario.
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Old 04-30-2020, 07:32 AM
 
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I didn't want to mention this before, because it was just what I "heard," but I heard an elementary school teacher saying that there was talk of closing until January.
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Old 04-30-2020, 07:59 AM
 
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I have friends who are def being told to prepare for all online learning until January. That prolly means the whole year, but they canít say that as people will freak out.
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Old 04-30-2020, 08:45 AM
 
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Hopefully, they'll get this thing under control, soon.

Hopefully, subs will be able to file new claims. I don't see why not, but I don't know much about this stuff. I just know that I don't want to work at Burger King. I actually thought about trying to get a job at a pet store. Seriously.
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school in August?
Old 04-30-2020, 09:25 AM
 
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I keep thinking about how they are going to manage back to school and I just can't see HOW! I've decided that I just can't risk subbing or volunteering. At 74 I'm in the high risk group. I have been in my house for 6 weeks and gone out only to walk early morning for exercise and fresh air. I may just stay home until Christmas and beyond! I got depressed the other day but then realized I need to figure out a new way of living so I made myself a list of things I need to do every day and more.
I am making masks, knitting a blanket for my granddaughter and I do have a nice husband (53 years married) so I can't complain.
The things I miss are going to school to sub or volunteer and I just don't think I'll be able to risk that until they come up with a vaccine or something.
I worry about all the kids going back to school especially my grandkids. This virus is strange and powerful - we don't yet know how it will develop.
I'm lucky that I don't have to work thanks to a frugal husband all these years.
Maybe for others finding another way to earn is a good idea. Your health is crucial.
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Old 04-30-2020, 10:19 AM
 
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I think there will be a vaccine within a year. Scientists are working around the clock on it. I believe they already are doing testing, with volunteers, with the antibodies.
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Old 04-30-2020, 10:36 AM
 
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wow Haley, that's an excellent point i had not thought about. american work culture may see changes!
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The more things change...
Old 05-01-2020, 02:53 AM
 
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My crystal ball is quite cloudy... I think what we don't know far surpasses what we do know. I also believe the politicians (including state departments of education) are fairly inept when it comes to managing education.

Two things I'm somewhat confident about:

First, while I don't know what the time frame looks like, I don't think the "new normal" will be so vastly different than what it was before this pandemic. There are a lot of reasons I believe that but the major one is that big changes take time simply because of inertia and human nature. I do think we will see some significant changes in direction--not just in education. But our society is simply not even close to ready to make a major shift in the way we educate. History proves that as we continue to cling to even simple things that don't work.

Second, I think the role of a substitute teacher will change--or maybe more accurately, the demands will and perhaps the required skillet will be different. Even right now, it's entirely possible that a teacher might be unable to perform for a day. How many subs would be able to fill in, teaching online, etc.? If we are going to move in the direction of remote learning, there will still be a need for subs but there will be a lot more involved than classroom management and worksheets. (I'm not denigrating subs here, just noting there is a world of difference between being a teacher and being a sub.)

Because I also teach adults, I'm experiencing some of the same problems public education teachers are... a need to learn a lot quickly and make lots of changes. Managing a "Zoom" classroom is different than being in a live classroom. We had some issues in a recent adult class and I said: "Imagine what this would be like if you were all six years old." The teachers in the class were vigorously nodding. It's overwhelming but it's also challenging and fun. Many of my adult students are loving it and thinking it's the new normal. It's not, but it will be part of it. The more things change, the more they stay the same.
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I think we will be in high demand
Old 05-01-2020, 06:30 AM
 
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I actually think subs will be in higher demand than ever before, going forward. Here in NJ (one of the few states where the Governor really wants to try reopening in June), I read an article stating how school districts may need to hire a lot more subs because many full time teachers may have a staggered schedule that requires them to work remotely for some classes, and subs will be needed to cover their OTHER classes on days that teacher is working from home.

The one thing that worries me is that IF school districts go with a long term half day in person school day, they may not pay us for a full day. Yet, I say good luck to school districts cutting sub pay at a time when they may need to hire more. Have any of you received indication of sub pay being adjusted in the Fall? Just curious.

One final thing...I agree a vaccine will be available sooner than later and I am sure all school employees will be required to get it too. Last I heard on CBS news, the vaccine may be available by Christmas at this point. Sounds very promising!
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Old 05-01-2020, 06:55 AM
 
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Every doctor I have heard says 18 months is the most likely, a year would be the fastest. The White House is trying to push these vaccine testing stories because they want people out and to open up the economy. Even if they got a vaccine, they still have to mass produce it and people have to get it. So add months onto whatever the actual date of the roll out is.

I haven’t gotten any indication they will raise sub pay. I think it’s too early for them to budget that. If I risk going to school, no way would I do half days though.
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Old 05-01-2020, 07:18 AM
 
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You are mistaken about the White House making up fast vaccine stories. The fact is that Oxford University (UK) is already testing their version of it and over 70 other companies across the globe are working on their version of a vaccine. They HOPE to have something available worldwide by late December or January. Read up on Oxford University vaccine studies to learn more. This has nothing to do with the White House, this is a global effort.
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Old 05-01-2020, 07:53 AM
 
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I def read that. I’m glad they are making progress, but I haven’t heard any doctor say they would be able to make a vaccine that fast. Maybe they have laxer laws in the Uk, but you have to run multiple trials here first, get FDA approval, a company has to buy the rights to produce it for five years, etc. So say they had it by Xmas, U.S. red tape would prolly hold it up for another year. Unless our govt was willing to drop red tape. But since medicine is driven by profit in this country, I doubt it.

The stories I’m referring to are something Fauci was talking about. An experimental drug has shown some results in small patient pools, but he also cautioned against saying it was a cure. Turkey is also trying to run with the drug Trump toted in his press briefings, but look at our recent history with that country and trying to win over trump for aid.
Both stories are being manipulated by the conservative media as an immediate cure.
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Old 05-01-2020, 09:46 AM
 
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I think it is very risky to ever put out a date, for anything, the way things are changing so rapidly. The PP is right, having an effective vaccine and getting it out to millions of people are two different things.

I like that Trump is always positive, but I know it is probably fueled by wanting to be reelected, in my opinion.

By the way, I did get "the letter," and it actually has a date for school to reopen. I was surprised and not convinced it is accurate.
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Old 05-01-2020, 07:44 PM
 
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I see about the same demand for subs - and I think classroom management will be a lot easier.
Social distancing will still be in effect in September, so districts will have to adjust by having students on a 2 day in school , 2 day out of school schedule. Half the student body will be in school when we are there. The other half will be working (hopefully) on online assignments.
So I think our classes will only have 12-15 students, maybe fewer, at one time. That will reduce stress levels, but then again, some of us will be stressed just having to be there, and some may get infected as schools tend to harbor all sorts of nasty viruses, leading to additional short-terms shutdowns I fear.

Long-term subs will be in demand because some teachers will take a semester off to avoid having to deal with the fallout from the pandemic. I think districts will tend to hire those who have done some online teaching.
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Old 05-02-2020, 07:10 AM
 
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Personally Iím not waiting to see what it is going to be like in September. I am actively searching for work that will pay me enough to live on. Iím tired of working 70 hours a week and barely getting by. Districts where Iíve subbed have had no communication with subs since this started. On their web sites they talk about how guidance counselors have really stepped up to ensure the mental health of not only students but parents and teachers as well. But nothing for subs.

Iím really surprised that they havenít sent out letters of reasonable assurance back dated to March 13, the last day I worked.
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Old 05-02-2020, 01:13 PM
 
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The drug they are talking about has shown promise in already hospitalized patients. It has reduced hospitalized days from an average of 15 to 11. This is progress, but we have a ways to go. Iím not a fan of being the recipient of a vaccine itís first time out.

I think classes will be smaller. Iím not sure what to think at this point but I have to make a decision about my credential renewal in real time. I think Iíll likely renew and look for something else part time.
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Old 05-02-2020, 02:07 PM
 
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Saw a video with a doctor, he said the fastest they ever developed a vaccine was for mumps and it took four years. If you rush a vaccine, you can create a protein that doesnít help you develop antibodies. Instead, it will actually make you more sick when you are actually exposed to whatever the disease is. He said social distancing and hand washing is going to be the way to combat this until we get a vaccine.
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Old 05-02-2020, 03:59 PM
 
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I like that Trump is always positive, but I know it is probably fueled by wanting to be reelected, in my opinion.
In part, yes. Mostly he's just a con artist/snake oil salesman. (Of course folks can choose to believe him and inject Lysol as a vaccine. But I don't think they'd like the result. )

As for the question of whether subbing is a viable job choice in the future, I really don't know. I admit I've gotten sick more often since subbing than I have my entire life. I actually think I got Covid in late February. And I'm sure I picked it up at school. I was horrendously sick and unable to work for a few days, and it took 2 months to fully recover! If I do return, I'm going to have to take more precautions to protect my health!

Even after a Covid 19 vaccine becomes available, I'm sure there will be more pandemics coming down the pike, maybe worse. Will schools continue to shut down due to these waves of contagion? Or will public schools as we know them become a thing of the past? (There are some folks who would welcome that.)

Another issue is when schools will reopen and under what conditions. If they remain closed for too long, many of us will be forced to find other work. Also, who knows if or when schools will ever return to normal? With virtual and/or part-time classes, the demand for subs would decrease considerably. It's all up in the air right now. Anything could happen.

Last edited by luv2teach2017; 05-02-2020 at 06:02 PM..
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Old 05-04-2020, 03:18 PM
 
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Sorry you got sick, but glad you are better.

Georgia has seen a spike of least a 1000 new covid cases since they started relaxing restrictions over a week ago. So Texas and other states will be next. Between the mouth breathers who are doing the stay at home protests to people on the beach, we will see thousands of new cases in the next month. The fed govt has changed their tune about how many people they expect to die, because they want to push the economy and will do so at any cost. Now they are trying to gaslight about how China lied about how much they knew about the virus. While this may be true, it doesnít help us or change the way our govt dropped the ball on this.

Taking into account that the new push is to get people out, we will see more cases. I assume red states will attempt to open schools on time and in person. Two major colleges in Texas say they are already planning to open in the fall. The NFL is pushing forward with its schedule.

I guess for me it comes down to a few factors- are schools going to be making people wear masks and have sanitizer and wipes in every room? And are they going to make some attempt to social distance? With the budget cuts, I donít see how they will have the money for this unless people donate or they make parents get the stuff for their kids. If so, I might be back in a school. If we are looking at no work and virtual school and can get more unemployment, that would be the other option.

If itís going to be like the last few weeks of school in March were- scared kids, scared teachers and staff, being asked to cover on my prep for teachers who had gone home sick and having to then touch their laptops with no kind of wipes to clean it with, then Iíll find something else.
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Old 05-04-2020, 04:17 PM
 
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It is easy for people with an agenda (not saying you are one of those, but don't know where you are getting your information) to skew the facts to favor their "cause," but California has been very restrictive. I believe we were the first state to even have stay-at-home orders, and we have many new cases, every day (1,371 new cases just yesterday).

This is why I'm very leery of newspapers, and such. Especially CNN with their fake news. I've seen it, myself, from CNN, several times lately.
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Old 05-04-2020, 05:17 PM
 
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https://www.wrdw.com/content/news/Ge...570119031.html


It has been widely reported in local and national news. This was one of the first headlines I found on google.

What instances do you mean with CNN? The tv station or their web news stories? I havenít watched CNN in about a decade, but it used to be a good source for news, particularly for international news. It just seems like they have a lot of pro and anti trump taking heads on now and prefer that argument format. Their website is still decent for some stories, but I donít seek it out.


I donít have an agenda, but I think itís clear out govt has one. They want to open the economy, so they are trying to pivot on what they think are the acceptable amounts of deaths and deflect to China when they still havenít provided testing and Ppe to the people who need it most.
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Old 05-04-2020, 06:17 PM
 
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are schools going to be making people wear masks and have sanitizer and wipes in every room?
Sanitizer and wipes in every room has already been standard practice in all the elementary schools where I've subbed. The teachers supply a lot of it themselves, and parents donate as well.
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Old 05-04-2020, 09:19 PM
 
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In the high schools they always had Kleenex and pump sanitizers.
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Old 05-04-2020, 10:08 PM
 
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Hs didnít usually have sanitizer. The front office had some for general use. Some teachers had wipes, but usually nothing else.
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cleaner schools please!
Old 05-05-2020, 09:18 AM
 
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Hs didn’t usually have sanitizer. The front office had some for general use. Some teachers had wipes, but usually nothing else.
In the primary grades, kids routinely make messes, so it's been standard practice to have cleaning supplies and sanitizer around. But with this pandemic scare, I hope schools will start attending to hygiene and cleanliness at all grade levels.

Hand sanitizer, tissue, wipes should be available in all classrooms, and the schools should supply it. ( In my district, the schools supply tissue, but not wipes and sanitizer. Teachers end up buying the cleaning supplies.) It's a good idea to have the students wipe off their desks and table tops at the end of each day as well as use sanitizer before lunchtime, etc..

The little kids love to clean up. But the big kids get lazy and resistant. They will need to be "retrained" to take responsibility. I really think the bar needs to be raised here and everyone pitch in to make schools cleaner and healthier places to be.
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Old 05-05-2020, 09:35 AM
 
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Yeah, I subbed in a hs computer class the last week of school and there were only wipes. Some kids used it on the keyboards before class and maybe 5 wiped it down after and did their phones as well. Kids would sneeze and use tissue but there was no sanitizer for them to use. Iím sure kids were spreading germs like crazy. I think part of it for older kids is that they have to raise their hand or ask permission, fill out a sign in sheet and mark their time AND take some hall pass with usually a large piece of wood and Iím sure itís filthy. They can also only usually go one at time.They will have to find a realistic approach to make it easier for them to go. Unfortunately, kids already abuse it in its current form.

I honestly donít know how they are going to respond to all of this. I had a kid in the last week who had used a pen on his skateboard and the ink had run and gotten all over his shoe. He had tracked paint everywhere and was using the purell and tissues to clean it up. I told him like three times to go to the bathroom and get paper towels and he refused. But itís not like I can force kids to go. He kept saying the bathroom was too far away. The more I think about it, the more I hope I donít have to go back.
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Old 05-05-2020, 09:41 AM
 
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The HS I work at had hand sanitizer, but I think the teachers bought it because it was a different type/brand in each class, unfortunately. The school supplied the Kleenex.
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Fractured, I hear you!! You're so right...
Old 05-17-2020, 11:53 AM
 
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Fractured, I hear you!! And You're so right...

It's a ####ty job even under the best of circumstances, and next year will probably be the worst of circumstances we've ever had to deal with!

And all for low pay, no health or other benefits and no paid time off!

Thinking my subbing days may be done depending on what happens....just unfortunate it may have to end this way!

Used to actually enjoy this job!
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Old 05-18-2020, 11:10 AM
 
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Well said above post!
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South Korea Schools opening
Old 05-19-2020, 01:40 PM
 
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Per the news today, FYI, "South Korea has reported 13 new positive cases, a possible sign that a recent outbreak in the capital area is stabilizing as officials prepare to reopen schools this week."

Unfortunately, it didn't say what the reopening of the schools would actually look like, though. That would be interesting info.

I did hear, also, yesterday, that there is a university that is going to have their Fall semester end at Thanksgiving, because they think there will be a spike at the holiday. It didn't say if they were going to start the semester, early, or how they would make up for the lost class time, but I thought it was a good idea.

That way they are going to be able to have in-person classes. I thought that was a good compromise and an intelligent decision. I think online "learning" is almost a waste of time, even in college, especially if nobody is used to it and everyone is winging it.

I know I'll get slammed on here because I think it is a good idea, so save it.

By the way, does anyone know how I could sign up for the clinical trials? Might as well do something with my time, these days, instead of being a couch potato.
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