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Question about taxes
Old 11-10-2019, 01:31 PM
  #1

As I read others’ very very low property taxes (less than $2,000!), I keep wondering how your states/schools support themselves.

I live in a state that has:
*high property taxes
*state income tax
*sales tax
*gas tax

Some of you post low/nonexistent amounts. How do your states afford to run themselves?

And, FYI, I’m not complaining. I don’t want to move and I love my state. But I would also love to see some potholes fixed. I just wonder if we’re mismanaged or if your state’s money comes from other sources.


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Taxes
Old 11-10-2019, 01:52 PM
  #2

Amiga, we live in the same state. I bought a townhouse a year and a half ago. Paying $6200 a year in property taxes. It hurts!
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Old 11-10-2019, 02:03 PM
  #3

I found this article from 2017, which explains why NJ has such high property taxes. Maybe some of it makes sense to you in California also.

https://www.nj.com/politics/2017/02/...est_in_us.html

Point 1 was interesting because it is true that south Jersey is less populated and taxes are cheaper there.
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Old 11-10-2019, 02:03 PM
  #4

We have just over an acre of lakefront property with about 750 ft of lake frontage and we pay just over $2200 a year in taxes. It is slightly more than what we paid when we did not live on the lake ($1750).
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Old 11-10-2019, 02:04 PM
  #5

Yikes! When I lived in Florida up until five years ago, my property taxes on my small (1400sq. ft home) were never more than 600-700 -a yr. Florida gets alot of revenue from tourists, but so should California.


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Old 11-10-2019, 02:19 PM
  #6

The only thing I know is that natural gas funds schools here. I have no idea how the state pays for anything.

I legit had no idea what my property taxes cost, so I looked it up. I don't think 2015 is accurate! 2015 notwithstanding, I love the low COL here.
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Old 11-10-2019, 02:53 PM
  #7

Quote:
Amiga, we live in the same state. I bought a townhouse a year and a half ago. Paying $6200 a year in property taxes. It hurts!
SoCalTeach, I’m here to make you feel better: We must have bought at the same time and my little old condo property taxes are $10,600. HOWEVER I’m really grateful for that because I used my 1-time old people’s downsize Proposition to keep the tax base from my old house; without Proposition Savior, my property taxes would have been $14,600 last year (and more this year).

Jackie, interesting article, thanks.

Zia, maybe in 2015 you were living in California or New Jersey.
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Old 11-10-2019, 03:11 PM
  #8

https://wallethub.com/edu/states-wit...y-taxes/11585/


There are infrastructure report cards online that are informative . The health of the state's infrastructure is related to the taxes we pay.


https://www.infrastructurereportcard...nfrastructure/
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Old 11-10-2019, 04:01 PM
  #9

I live in NJ and the property taxes are ridiculous. We also have high toll roads. I would love to know where all the money goes. I agree with Jackie about North Jersey costing more than South Jersey. My 25 minute commute is now 45+ minutes because so many people are moving farther south to have lower property taxes and bigger homes. It works out to be about the same with all the tolls! Dh and I will be moving out when I retire. We canít afford the cost of living, property taxes and our pensions being taxed.
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Old 11-10-2019, 04:07 PM
  #10

I've mentioned it on here before. We lived in southern NJ and left in 1999 moving to NC. Taxes are a third!


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Old 11-10-2019, 04:15 PM
  #11

States seem to get their money one way or another however they always seem to always want more.For example, My property values have sky rocketed in the past 7 years and the amount of property taxes collected is based on property values. Higher property values equal a lot more $$ in tax revenues. But this just doesnt seem to be enough and we often are asked to vote for additional taxes to fund items that are already funded by rapidly increasing property taxes. Ok..with that being said, I always for for additional school taxes.

My state has:
*high property taxes
*no state income tax
*high sales tax
*3rd highest gas tax in the whole country
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Old 11-10-2019, 05:06 PM
  #12

Mine are around $1200 per year. While that's nice for me, schools definitely pay the price for that. Our per pupil spending is among the lowest in the country and is less than half of what my home state (where I went to college/did all my practicums and ST, and where my parents teach) spends. The difference is pretty astounding.

Back home one sped teacher per grade level or maybe 2 grade levels is pretty common. One or two title 1 teachers per grade level for schools who are title 1. Multiple para positions. Class sizes around 20 kids. Positions like dean/AP, psych, and counselor in every building- sometimes multiple. My dad's elementary school has 3 counselors. Here, class sizes of 30 or more are the norm, even in primary grade levels. One sped teacher and one title 1 teacher for the entire school, or even shared among multiple schools is common. Same for positions like counselors, psychs, etc. My first district had only 3 psychs for the entire district of 23 schools. Salaries are also significantly lower here. I'd make about $25K more back home and the COL is ridiculously lower than it is here. My townhouse would have maybe been 1/6 the price of what I paid here, if that.

Roads are better taken care of as well in my home state-especially in snow. Here they plow main roads only and they don't salt at all. They also stop much earlier- so what ends up happening is that days after a storm, snow is still on the roads and it turns into ice as it gets packed down from people driving on it, unless it's warm enough for it to melt. There is also a huge issue with public transit- routes end up not happening because they can't get enough drivers (they won't pay them enough).
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Old 11-10-2019, 05:46 PM
  #13

I pay over $5000 per year for my previous home (3 bedroom house) and about $3700 for my current house. Much of that goes for schools. In NH we have no sales tax or state income tax though.
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Old 11-10-2019, 06:42 PM
  #14

I am in FL. We have an almost 2000 sq. foot home and pay less than $2000 as well. We have no sales tax. However we do have tourist taxes and get a ton of revenue through tourism. I would assume CA does too.

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Old 11-11-2019, 06:11 AM
  #15

I live in southern NJ-close to PA and DE. Our property taxes are lower than north Jersey; however, our salaries are a lot less, too. My DIL's mother worked in a school district in North Jersey and recently retired making 6 figures with just 25 years (she took time off to stay home with children). The highest salary in my area is $81,000. This is my 37th year and I've been at the same salary for years. The COL is higher in north Jersey, but it is relative to the salaries.

I live in a small 3 bedroom/1 bath ranch home and pay almost $8,000 in taxes a year. A friend lives in a larger house in the same town and pays close to $20,000. We also have state income tax and sales tax in NJ. They do plow the main roads when it snows, but it takes a while for them to get to the side streets. We have to pay for weekly trash removal, but recycling pick up and drop off center is free . We pay sewer and water bills quarterly.

There is no public transportation per see. There is no taxi or Uber. You walk, ride a bike, ask a friend for a ride or stay home-especially when the weather is bad.
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Old 11-11-2019, 06:24 AM
  #16

Quote:
A friend lives in a larger house in the same town and pays close to $20,000.
Here's what I find weird: I didn't even know what I paid and you know what your friend pays. I pay taxes, but not attention, I guess?
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