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MissyMissy MissyMissy is offline
 
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Going Away from Cards
Old 07-27-2009, 11:36 AM
 
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Has anyone out there given up pulling cards or similar "tools" alone? I don't know any other teachers here who don't have a similar system, but I am determined to try it this year. Words of wisdom or encouragement?

I've read DWS and Setting Limits in the Classroom and some of Teaching Children to Care this summer. I'm still nervous about doing this alone. The students are going to see everyone else's marble jars, sticker charts, and treasure boxes and wonder what in the world happened to me!


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Old 07-27-2009, 11:42 AM
 
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Kahluablast posted a similar thread today on the first grade board. We were discussing that exact same thing. Great minds... Check it out and see if it helps.
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Go for it!
Old 07-27-2009, 12:46 PM
 
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Stay strong, and don't give in to those who believe that the only way to control student behavior is with "carrots"!
This past year, the AP said to me, "You have such good control of your students, but I can't figure out what your behavior plan is." I took that as a compliment!
I guess I use a combination of Character Counts! (trustworthiness, respect, responsibility, fairness, caring, citizenship) and DWS's ABCD to reinforce with the students that THEY are each in charge of their own behavior. So far, it works for the vast majority.
Good luck, and stay strong!
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Moving away from cards...
Old 07-31-2009, 02:18 PM
 
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You all are having the same discussion my grade level has been having over the past several years. How do you communicate with families about student behavior?

Here is why I ask. I have noticed that I tend to allow behaviors to go for a bit (as they are not so disruptive alone) and then they suddenly snowball into poor choices. At that point I have a hard time dealing with it in a gentle way.

1. Without a card system (or whatever) how do you control behavior on a day to day basis?
2. How do you communicate poor behaviors home on a daily basis?


I am new to this approach---would love insight and suggestions. I am just now reading up on morning meetings.

Thanks!
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I have never
Old 07-31-2009, 02:36 PM
 
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used the pulling card thing. I rarely have any behavior problems. I teach in an inner city title 1 school. I have read all the posts about people using all different systems. Sometimes, I just don't get it. I go over the rules and expect them to be followed.

Things I do if the rules are broke:
name on board
lose 5-10 minutes or all of recess
hitting/threatening/absolute defiante behavior -straight to office

I use a marble jar for all complements. When full we have a party.

Something that works really well for me is to look at the child and say, do we need to call your mom? She probably would like to know about your behavior. I will use the mom's/dad's first name. They are surprised I know it.

I have had the kids to call their parents at work to tell them about their behavior. It will only happen 1 time. The parents don't want to be called.

Having good home/school relationships with the parents is always my goal. When they know you are willing to work with them, they will bend over backwards for you.

I just expect the kids to behave.


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I'm reading DWS now...
Old 08-01-2009, 04:09 PM
 
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and I'm wondering if name on board, missing recess, and marble jars, isn't that basically the same thing as pulling cards? Just a different way of doing it? At my school, we have noticed that many children don't seem to have any internal motivation to behave and do the right thing. The first question is always "what do I get?". So I'm trying to learn something new. It's hard to change after so many years!
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Prevent, don't react!
Old 08-02-2009, 12:48 PM
 
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RC is proactive instead of reactive. When you flip a card or use another tangible tool, you are reacting to behavior whether it is positive or negative.
Take time at the beginning of the year to create some simple, easy-to-remember rules. Be respectful, be responsible, do your best - guiding principles vs. specific commands.

Then model, model, model! Never as punishment, but as practice. Even with my fourth graders, we practice everything. We practice walking down the hall, and if we have trouble, I just say "Let's practice that again, it didn't seem quite right."

If one child is struggling, I make time to talk to them. We identify the problem together and the child, with guidance from me, verbalizes how he or she will change the behavior. You will develop some signals with your chronic offenders! A look from you and they will know they need to move to another spot, or whatever your action plan is with that child.

Honestly, I don't think parents need daily feedback. I call when there is a pattern of behavior or a big event - good or bad.

As far as parties, we do have parties - it's part of being a community of learners and having fun together! Let the kids help you plan the party. I tell my kids we work hard together and it is important that we have fun together, too.
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I agree...
Old 08-02-2009, 01:58 PM
 
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Jenn73, I totally agree and that is basically what I do in my class. However, I have also used a notebook for the last few years. Students briefly describe what the problem was and at the end of the week, those that didn't have to write anything down were rewarded in some way. I would like to get away from that rewarding good behavior part. That's why I was reading DWS by Marshall. How does RC deal with rewarding good behavior?
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intrinsic motivation
Old 08-02-2009, 03:12 PM
 
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I believe that good behavior needs to be intrinsically motivated. I don't use a point, check mark, card, chip, or strike system, nor do I reward points or parties for behavior that is expected. I certainly do recognize my students when I see exemplary behavior and tell them exactly what/why it was so wonderful. The reaction on their faces tells me that they know and feel good about themselves when they can make others (me) happy. For example, the procedure in the class if I step out of the room is to continue doing whatever they were doing. When I return and everyone is on task, I will make a big deal about how respectful and responsible they were to keep doing what they were supposed to be doing, yada, yada. "Use self-control" "Do what you are supposed to do" "Do the right thing" are all phrases I use often.
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Bellringer, just curious
Old 08-02-2009, 07:15 PM
 
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what would happen in your classroom if you returned and some were not on task?


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not on task
Old 08-03-2009, 05:11 AM
 
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Sometimes, if a lot of the students aren't following procedures, I may use my "disappointed" face and voice. I will stop the activity and have a short discussion on the proper procedures. Reinforce it with their need to be respectful and responsible and grown-up which means following the procedures.

I try to get them to WANT to do the right things. I believe that the most effective behavior program is the one that helps them develop their own control.
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Old 08-03-2009, 05:14 AM
 
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It's so nice to see so many people "on board" with teaching strategies over punishment and rewards!!
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I think
Old 08-03-2009, 10:02 AM
 
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that you need to have both. I was trained in applied behavior analysis and worked with some really rough kids. Most kids will respond to RC alone with the worse "conseuquence" being disappointing your teacher or some other mild natural consequence. But some students need a little more (and then some need a LOT, hehe), especially if they come from very harsh homes. I use both systems: lots of RC type activities/team/class building, rule developing, natural consequences, expectations, etc. But I also give them money (simplified classroom economy) that they can cash in for privileges on a random basis, so it's not every single time you do something good you get something, it's just random (which is stronger reinforcement from a research point of view anyway). This year I'm trying a different "card pull" type system that my partner thought of. We have three basic rules: Be Responsible, Respectful and Safe. So we're going to have a three way Venn diagram and if necessary, they will move their name out of all three so it can be communicated home. This will not be automatic, but it will be in the bag of tricks regarding consequences. It will help us remember what happened.
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