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ST13 ST13 is offline
 
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Old 05-26-2016, 05:14 PM
 
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I have a student on my caseload who is not technically "mine" I do not pull him for anything he is in his gen Ed class all day and I check in for a few minutes every day.

He is diagnosed with an emotional disability and benefits greatly from routine and structure. Well these last couple of weeks have been so crazy in school with tests and changing of schedules and I feel like his behavior has been really challenging.

His go to behavior is defiance. He will refuse to do things the teacher asks him to do and will argue with her constantly. He has a behavior chart and it's helped but it's hard because he is very socially aware of his peers and the thought of him being "different".

He does not enjoy talking to me or coming to me at all. I have to be in his room to meet his hours but he is very resistant and will completely ignore me.

It's hard because when he acts out I feel like if I start to intervene in front of his peers it will make it worse.... So I feel like I'm not doing enough to help him. It's also hard because since I'm really not with him for most of the day (maybe 20 minutes a day) I don't really know HOW to intervene. But then when he acts out I feel like other teachers are judging me by not stepping in since I am the special Ed teacher.

Does any of this make sense? I guess I'm just venting.


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Old 05-26-2016, 05:52 PM
 
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Have you talked to his parents? What does the child like? What motivates him? If you make going to your room therapeutic and "fun", it might be a mini reward instead of an embarrassment.

Do an interest inventory to find things that may be appealing for him. Food, candy, games, computer time, listen to music, etc.
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Old 05-27-2016, 02:12 AM
 
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We have talked to his parents multiple times and they are helpful but it still hasn't made a huge difference.

I've tried getting an idea of his interests, for his behavior chart he needs to get a certain amount of points before he can "buy" something from my prize box. We've even talked about what happens if he needs to come in my room to regroup and when we talk about it he seems on board but when the time comes he verbally says he does not want to come to my room (unless it's to get a prize on Friday)
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Old 05-27-2016, 07:15 PM
 
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My big problem kid said he did t care or didn't want to all the time. I think it was a defense mechanism and to look cool in front of the class. You can always offer the choice of going now or in x minutes. Or, if he's being a pill you can offer him the choice of going now or on his time (lunch, recess, etc). Or, you can say, "I'm sorry you feel that way, let's go."
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Old 05-28-2016, 11:40 AM
 
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If you've had the prize box going for a while, maybe change it up. Try offering free time on the computer while he's in your room for his prize or an opportunity for an extra 10 minutes of recess time with a friend (during a time that it would be ok with the classroom teacher for the child to miss).

I don't know how old he is, but I can see how having the special teacher in the room focused on him for a period of time each day might cause him to feel different and further aggravate his emotional issues. I think you're probably right that you intervening in front of peers will increase rather than decrease the behaviors. I'd maybe keep the focus on preventative with rewards, but change up the rewards. It might even help to have a talk with him (if he's capable of this- again, don't know his age or abilities) and just say that you don't want to intervene when he's in class, but you want to help support him to make good choices (or whatever) and what does he find most helpful?


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Old 05-30-2016, 03:03 PM
 
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Yes, I totally get what you are saying. I feel that I know a lot about academic disabilities but I have never really gotten much training on how to deal with emotional disabilities. I do think the other teachers expect us to know more because we're sped teachers, but with behavior kids I often feel that I don't really know more than a gen ed teacher would. Do you have a school psych or counselor that could help?

Do you have any control over what the services will look like? IME, many students (especially older students) are embarrassed by push-in services, even if they don't have behavior issues. Some of my teammates will often advocate for push-in services only for behavior kids, especially if they're not behind academically. I think there is also a myth that kids don't like being pulled out and/or it makes them feel "too different." This year I had advocated for asking the intermediate students what kind of services are most helpful to them and literally every single one has said they'd rather come to the resource room. When asked why, they say the push in services are embarrassing. If you could pull him out for 20 minutes a day on a regular basis instead of just hanging around in his room, it would be a lot easier to build a relationship with him. You could even start with just playing some games or doing other "fun" activities so that he wants to come. A few years ago I had a student that I literally just played games with for 15 minutes every day and used that time as an outlet to talk about some issues. It made her feel really comfortable and she wanted to come. If you have a relationship with him, it's also far more likely that he'll want to come to your room even when upset. We have several students that have severe issues with their gen ed teachers but 98% of the time are perfectly pleasant in resource.

For his gen ed room, we've had success with using a colored cup/card system with many of our defiant/work refusing students. I actually did this with a very difficult kid in resource this year and it completely turned around her behavior. She would put out a blue index card on her desk when she was getting frustrated, and I would give her an "easier" (often, it was the same level of difficulty, but just broken into shorter sections) task to do. None of the other kids knew what it was for or really questioned it. We had another kid that would put a red cup on his desk when he needed a break; the teacher knew that the red cup meant, "Don't talk to me right now." Then we gradually reduced the amount of time he was allowed to put the cup out for. He was also allowed to come down to our room to show assignments that he completed/celebrate accomplishments.
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Old 05-30-2016, 03:35 PM
 
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Thank you! I really like the cup idea unfortunately though I feel like he would abuse that power when he didn't want to do something. For example, right now we have a system for him that if he needs to take a break he will ask to sit out in the hallway. (Or we ask him to sit in the hallway if we notice that things are getting out of hand)

He will often end up sitting in the hallway for half the day. He still does his work but he isn't with his peers. On one hand he is calm in the hallway and he is being productive. But on the other hand there are times when I feel like he is "winning" so to speak.

We have tried using my room as an incentive and it totally backfired. I guess this late in the year trying new systems is not the best idea for someone who craves stability but still I feel like I'm not doing anything because I just don't have the experience or background knowledge, I sometimes just feel useless.

He is in 4th grade so what others think is really important to him but when I tell him I'm gonna be in his room more often he says he dislikes that idea but when offered the choice of coming into my room he doesn't like that either.
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Old 05-30-2016, 05:08 PM
 
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You say this student benefits from routine and when his routine is out of whack, he resorts to defiance. This sounds like his coping skill when he doesn't feel in control.

If the routine was working for him, and then it had to be changed to meet testing schedules and end of year activities, then what was put in place if the team knew he would act out?

I would suggest that any changes in his upcoming schedule would be made aware to him so that he can have time to adjust and process this. You could say something like, "Joe, next Tuesday there will be testing going on in your room during your normal math time. Do you want to come test with me in my room?" This lets him know that he will be doing the required activity, but gives him some control for comfort. Have you tried something like that?
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Old 05-30-2016, 05:16 PM
 
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Yeah we try to give him as much notice as possible. For example if there is ever a sub we always give him a heads up etc.
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Does he?
Old 05-30-2016, 07:18 PM
 
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Giving the heads up is a good strategy but I know it doesn't always work. It's just usually the first thing we do with students with emotional or behavioral disabilities. Has he been acting up despite the routine? What is he looking to gain or avoid with the behavior? Did he have a FBA done in the past couple of years? If so, what did it say?


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Old 05-31-2016, 02:12 AM
 
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I think he likes the confrontation and I think he likes the attention. He does sometimes have bad days regardless of the routine but we assume something happens at home that kind of triggers it. I don't think it's task avoidance or anything because he literally does all his work and gets everything rights (he is very smart and in a gifted program)

I am not sure when he last time he had an FBA is but I can look into that. He is new to the school and these behaviors only started the last half of the year (though mom said he has shown them at his other school so they are not completely new)
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Let me ask someone
Old 05-31-2016, 04:45 AM
 
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Let me ask one of our behavior specialists at my school about this. We get kids like this more often than we would like. Maybe I can get some more ideas from her. Would that be ok with you?
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Old 05-31-2016, 05:09 AM
 
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I had the same problem with a student this year, the last week he would sit outside 1st period on the bench and just say he will be In "5 minutes". He is in High school and does not want to associate with the SDC kid's. I was wondering if you had him meet you in the Library instead, and you can have an activity. Maybe do some Vocabulary or spelling bee's -- you say he is GATE?
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Old 05-31-2016, 02:48 PM
 
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Teabreak - sure! Thanks! ... He had a sub today and did AWESOME!


Spoofy1 ... I could definitely try a different location! Thanks!
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Old 06-01-2016, 05:16 AM
 
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Ok, I talked to one of our ED/BD teachers in my department and gave her some of the info you gave me. I kind of knew what she would say

Stick with letting him know about changes coming up as you find out about them. It sounds like he doesn't care about a reinforcement menu as some do. He may not prefer tangible items but he may benefit from more positive interaction with adults. It seems as if he is looking for attention and getting negative attention is filling that need.

I would suggest trying to find out what he has done that was helpful that day and lay the praises on him. He will buck this for a bit and his behavior may get a bit worse (this is normal) but it will swing the other way. If he acts up, do selective ignoring or ask him to step out of the room and tell him he has 5 minutes and must come back in. Commend him for coming in the room and say something like, "I'll give you 1 minute on the timer to get ready to work." and walk away. Come back and expect him to be ready.

I know that it's the end of the year, but that doesn't mean he can't start this new routine. If you guys get it started then it can be something that is normal in his next grade level. I hope I helped some.
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Old 06-01-2016, 03:23 PM
 
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Wow thank you so much!! That is so helpful! I will pass along this info!! Thank you!
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