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What does writing look like your room?

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ElemenTchr ElemenTchr is offline
 
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What does writing look like your room?
Old 06-11-2016, 01:06 PM
 
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I am headed back to the resource room next year, after spending 2 years in an inclusion/co-teaching setting. We will have a 30 minute writing block, every day next year. We are expected to use a workshop model; however, I'm struggling with what that could look like in the resource setting. I teach 3rd grade and have Lucy Calkins for 3rd grade; however, is that totally appropriate in a resource setting? Most of my kids most likely will struggle with a correct sentence. I feel like I'll need to go lower and slower, while trying to hit the major points on my curriculum guidance document. What would you do? Would you follow Calkins for a lower grade, like 1st or 2nd or modify the 3rd grade one?


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Old 06-12-2016, 07:37 AM
 
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I would also like to see replies to this-I will be moving to the resource room also, teaching ELA. I've found lots of stuff on small group reading; not so much on small group writing.
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I struggle with this at this at times...
Old 06-12-2016, 07:55 AM
 
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They seem to need so much review, it seems difficult to move forward onto bigger and more complex tasks.

Then I overthink things... I think that if they complete the more difficult tasks with too much scaffolding and hand holding, did they really accomplish anything? Will they need this more difficult task in their real life if their own speech, language and vocab is somewhat (comparatively) limited?

So anyway, I tend to intermingle lots of review with new stuff with lots of prompts, modeling and scaffolding. I keep the new tasks in manageable chunks and try not to overwhelm them.

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I feel like I'll need to go lower and slower, while trying to hit the major points on my curriculum guidance document.
This is my take too. I try to hit the IEP goals and the essential elements of the grade level standards while staying nearer their level of understanding.

When possible, I try to use available tech so that their writing abilities can be measured separately from (less hampered by) their handwriting skills. It also seems to increase their motivation. They like being on the tablets and computers.
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Old 06-15-2016, 09:32 PM
 
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Will this be the only writing instruction your kids get, or will they be getting writing instruction in gen ed too? I assume they'll be getting both since you said it's only 30 minutes. I would love to have that much time for writing! I really don't have any time for resource classes focused only on writing; I pretty much have to integrate it into reading/math. I work on mostly conventions with my kids. I think writing conventions are such an important life skill. What happens when they go to fill out a job application and use horrible conventions? Being able to write correctly will make them stand out, even if it's just a minimum wage job. I pester my kids constantly about spacing, capitalization, word order, and punctuation. I expect them to do this any time we write, even if it's in math class. If I see a basic mistake like a capital in the middle of a word or a lowercase "i" by itself, I make them go back and fix it right then and there. I don't accept papers with basic mistakes in them. My kids are attending the gen ed writing block too, so they can access the instruction about the higher level skills there. IMO, learning how to "explode the moment" in a narrative is pointless if no one can read your narrative in the first place.
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Old 06-16-2016, 04:35 PM
 
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This will be there only writing time, since writing is a part of language arts and their IEP says they are to be in the pull out resource class for language arts, then this is it, aside from indirect things during reading time. My plan is to incorporate the conventions during one to one conferencing, as we go through their writing & teach quick mini lessons on them here and there. But I do agree with you about the importance of conventions and their usage is usually horrible.


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Calkins too
Old 06-20-2016, 05:17 PM
 
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We use Lucy Calkin's in my district and I use it two years below where I teach. My 5th grade resource uses 3rd grade and my 4th grade resource uses 2nd-3rd grade.
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