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Madaly320 Madaly320 is offline
 
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Madaly320
 
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I have no idea what I am doing
Old 06-13-2016, 06:10 PM
 
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First year teacher here. I teach severe disabilities. My students are very severe/profound. Most of our day is taken up with personal care and moving them from one piece of medical equipment to another. In between all of that, I am expected to teach in areas of math, ela, science and social studies. They understand that not all subjects will be taught daily.

We do not have a curriculum. It is all up to me and what is on their ieps. And I have no idea what to do. I have been planning day by day but now I am expected to have my lesson plans 2 weeks in advance.

Does anyone have any beginning ideas? They do not teach you in school HOW to teach. This is the part I am struggling with. I do not want to fail. You would think it would be easy because developmentally, my students are at a pre-k level and even below although they are 3-5th graders. But I am just stuck at how to begin. I have decided to have monthly themes in the hopes of making everything easier. I feel so uncreative and unimaginative and am starting to wonder if this is even for me. Any help would be great.


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dee dee is offline
 
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Be easy on yourself!
Old 06-13-2016, 11:01 PM
 
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You have this.

Starting with themes will help you focus, AND will help your students (and families.) Holidays/seasons is probably easiest. Or perhaps some pre-kind themes such as community helpers, weather, etc.

Since you don't have to teach each subject every day, can you have Math Monday, Reading Tuesday, etc? If the kids are that severe, perhaps following prek standards would help guide you.

I only do moderate, so I'm only throwing these ideas out there. In general though, we are very hard on ourselves!
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LaLouchie LaLouchie is offline
 
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Relax
Old 06-14-2016, 07:27 AM
 
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The first year is always the hardest, pace your self. Look into the TEACH method. When planning your lessons focus on thematic units that have real life applications, like environmental print. I once did a whole unit on McDonald's for my pre-school diss class. We counted using fries, we sorted using milkshakes, we read using signs... and yes, it was all made from construction paper.
Thematic units are a great place to start, and they allow you to hit all subjects.
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Great ideas already given
Old 06-14-2016, 07:55 AM
 
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You have a tough job! Would it be possible to throw math in as you are moving from place to place. You could count how many steps you take moving from spot to spot. You could count fingers as they are using equipment. Could you make letters of the alphabet/sight word flashcard to go over when ever you have them on equipment? Spell out the letters in their names when you can. Good luck. Keep coming here for suggestions.
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SpedinTx SpedinTx is offline
 
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Active Learning
Old 06-15-2016, 09:47 AM
 
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Depending on how profoundly handicapped your students are you may want to look into Lilli Nelson's active learning. It was designed for multi handicapped students. It basically where you set up centers and opportunities for the students to self discover their learning using real world items. For example set up a bin of rice and you can use that for the student to explore textures, capacity, weight, counting (3 scoops, 4 scoops), ect


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Curriculum
Old 06-24-2016, 02:46 AM
 
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Can you get ahold of a mentor? Plus, I think they should provide you with some materials. Do you have a budget so you can order things? Is there someone in charge of special ed that you could contact and meet with for your questions? You must have had some idea on what to do or they wouldn't have hired you. I was in a severe setting a long time ago. There was a time around lunch where the kids helped make things to eat. I think there was a switch hooked up to a blender and they made smoothies. They took turns putting in their banana or whatever, hand over hand at first. Then you keep track on how independent they can get by charting. You practice colors, like "put in the yellow banana." Then the student would do it with help. Then they would try to find the banana on their visual speech machine. The machine would say "yellow" and eventually they would learn how to find yellow, banana. If you don't have any AAC augmentative alternative communication devices, you'll probably want to find out where to get them. Look at their goals on their IEPs to see what you need to focus and progress monitor on. We had music, bubbles so they could try to blow them. We read them stories. They got included into the mainstream during the day too. They went on field trips to practice skills. I don't think you want to use paper, try for real objects. They need concrete learning not abstract. I'm sure you have assistants. Were they there before you? You could ask them about what was done in the past. Hope you can relax a little. Once you get your plans down for the first two weeks, they probably won't change too much because their progress will be slow. Make sure you are keeping track with lots of charts, the assistants probably have them and know what to do to get you started.
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Madaly320 Madaly320 is offline
 
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Old 06-25-2016, 02:39 AM
 
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Thank you and thank you everyone for your ideas. I am feeling much better after I got myself a little organized. It is very hard in the setting I am in it is in a small private school, and most of the kids are severe/profound and medically fragile . My particular classroom is mostly students who cannot move their hands on their own and they will never have independence as far as reaching and grabbing. They require assistance to hit switches. Most of our day consists of moving them around to different positions putting them in medical equipment and toileting. It's just a whole new environment that I need to get used to. I guarantee that I will eventually end up back at public school but for now I will make the best of this and learn while I have the chance. Thanks again everyone, I am definitely taking note of all the suggestions! I feel a lot better since my post!
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