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SpeedLimit62 SpeedLimit62 is offline
 
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Meeting CCSS for students with IEPs
Old 08-18-2016, 03:02 PM
 
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I'm in a new district and one thing that is really hard for me is trying to get my 6th and 7th graders who are at K-1-2 level to work on the same grade level standards for common core.

Any tips?


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NewCAteacher NewCAteacher is offline
 
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Ugh
Old 08-18-2016, 04:19 PM
 
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I apologize as I do not have tips, but I need help with this too. I don't understand how we can be expected to achieve grade level standards with our kids when the very reason they're in our classes is because they aren't meeting the grade level standards.

Tips appreciated!!!
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Same boat
Old 08-18-2016, 05:45 PM
 
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I feel as the students get older that I'm always the bearer of bad news:

"No, your student who knows 20 sight words won't be able to take the 5th-grade Social Studies test!"
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Old 08-18-2016, 07:05 PM
 
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I have posted about this many times. This is probably the most frustrating aspect of teaching sped for me. My state department of ed. is very public and persistent with their stance that students with learning disabilities can and should perform at grade level. Basically the only students that are "excused" from this are those with cognitive disabilities. I think it's ridiculous. To get into sped in the first place, students have to show a documented non-response to varied and intensive interventions AND massively fail a standardized test (like Woodcock Johnson or WIAT or whatever each school uses). After all that, somehow having a magic pile of papers (IEP) is supposed to make them suddenly start responding to interventions and passing standardized tests? Surely I can't be the only one that sees the impossible irony in this? Then if by some miracle they do start responding to interventions and passing standardized tests, next time they're reevaluated they don't qualify for sped anymore (which honestly, when this happens it makes me think the student never had a learning disability in the first place).

In my district, the interventions provided by sped are no better than those provided by title 1, at least for reading. Often, the title 1 groups are smaller than mine, have less or no behavior issues (the title teacher can refuse students who would interrupt the learning of others), and can meet for more time than my groups can since they're only working on reading. So students get all of that as part of RtI, we determine it doesn't work/they don't make progress, and then the "fix" is to put them in my larger group that meets for less time and probably has some severe behavior issues in it. Gen ed teachers often tell me, "Oh, but you have special knowledge/training for working with these students!" I would like a refund on my college tuition as I was not offered courses on the "magic special ed strategies" that fix learning disabilities in a timely fashion. I also have not been provided with the special tier 3 program that fixes learning disabilities in a timely fashion while catching students up on grade level content that they've missed. I'm using the same strategies that the title 1 teacher is using.

Now that my rant is over, my only advice is to consider what the true objective of the lesson is. If it's something like a Science or Social Studies lesson where the objective is to gain content knowledge or increase critical thinking skills, you can remove the barrier that is preventing the student from accessing the information. For example, if your main goal for that lesson is content knowledge rather than improving reading skills, the student can listen to the reading to get the content. If writing is a struggle and the main goal is showing what they've learned over improving/showing writing skills, they can dictate responses or make a presentation instead.
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Haley23
Old 08-21-2016, 10:21 AM
 
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Your reply...it speaks to my soul. Haha


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CCSS and IEP
Old 08-28-2016, 08:10 PM
 
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One thing I learned in writing goals with CCSS in mind is to link the goals to CCSS.

For instance Basics 3 (google and buy the latest version for mod/severe) really aligns their goals to the CCSS. The thing is, you do NOT make a goal for a child that is out of reach. If your student is reading at 1st grade and in the 7th grade, you would not say child will read at the 7th grade, but you may say that child will read with help the vocabulary from a 7th grade reader. Or that student will gain fluency by reading ability level books.
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