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readandweep readandweep is offline
 
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Percent of students with IEPs?
Old 08-04-2018, 10:12 AM
 
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I was wondering about how many of the students in your buildings have IEPs?

My school is looking at an incoming sixth-grade class with about 30 percent having an IEP.

My previous district also had around 30 percent of students with an IEP as well, isn't the percentage supposed to be closer to 10 percent?

Neither of these schools were schools of choice or destination districts, but still...


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Old 08-04-2018, 10:32 AM
 
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That seems very high to me. My school has about 12-13%, which is similar to the state average.

However, our middle school and high school have as much as 40%. My state has school choice/open enrollment. For whatever reason, families will send their kids to our elementary schools, but then seek out one of the nearby "better" (wealthier) districts or charter schools for secondary.

Districts are allowed to deny open enrollment for students with IEPs by saying that their sped program is "already full." Therefore, our MS and HS end up with a huge percentage of IEPs because so many of the other kids end up leaving/the total number of students has gone way down and the kids with IEPs are stuck there.
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Old 08-04-2018, 11:27 AM
 
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30% is high! When I was a school psych, we were always told it should be around 10%, give or take. Most of our schools were around that. One was more like 35-40%, which was ridiculously high. 30% is really high!
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Old 08-04-2018, 02:16 PM
 
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Ours is around 25%, we are a small rural school. One class per grade (k -5). 95% of our students qualify for free/ reduced lunch. Many of our students have been born addicted to drugs and or alcohol. The result is a higher IEP ratio.
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Percentage of SPED kids
Old 08-04-2018, 05:18 PM
 
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That seems really high! I have also heard about it being closer to 10%. However, the DSM is more lenient on some disorders which can open up the door for Other Health Impairment.



Also, many kids are English learners who just need time to learn the language but are incorrectly identified as SPED. Then you have the people who put kids in just because they are struggling and they need the help even though there isn't a disability.


I think that was kinda rant-y. Sorry!


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Thanks
Old 08-05-2018, 07:04 AM
 
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I think you all have good points about this.

My current district does see a lot of parents either choose our magnet middle school, our middle school with the gifted program or families move out of the district completely in middle school.

My school also more closely resembles a mini-high school with 600 kids and the complete abandonment of the middle school concept and teacher teaming. Many families try my school or some of the other middle schools, get frustrated and pull their kids.

This leaves schools like mine with a higher percentage of troubled kids and/or kids with IEPs.

My previous district did seem to throw anyone who struggles into special ed. The IEP numbers are probably also increasing because, like PP, that rural area is seeing a large percentage of families affected by the opiod epidemic.
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Old 08-06-2018, 03:44 PM
 
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We do not hav echos, thatís very odd. If a student needs an IEP they must qualify, but they get one!
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Percent
Old 08-06-2018, 04:46 PM
 
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Our state average is about 15%.
Last year my school was around 30% with the 5th grade at 50%!

I heard our school is having even more students needing special ed services. We were not prepared for that last year and wonít be this coming year either. Itís hard to find qualified teachers to work there. Our school will only be 3 years in service as a new charter school. Schools around us have been pushing parents to our school. The principal knows very little about special ed and doesnít want anything to do with it. No curriculum last year and not much space with very little supplies. If parents knew I think theyíd go elsewhere. Seems like weíre getting students who havenít been successful in the regular public schools, but they can offer way more than we have.
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Why so many in special ed?
Old 08-08-2018, 02:42 PM
 
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Aside from the opiod epidemic, I wonder if part of the reason for the increase in kids needing IEPs has something to do with the way the curriculum has changed. It seems like we are expecting kids to do more and more at younger and younger ages.
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Old 08-09-2018, 05:09 AM
 
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I think itís ACES (Adverse Childhood Experiences) and people are diagnosing learning disabilities and OHI such as ADD/ADHD when itís really the ACES. This just came up in a workshop I went to.

My school was well under 10% but that because for years we had a psych who refused to qualify kids who desperately needed it. Weíre not getting those kids qualified (unfortunately years too late).

And we still canít get bilingual kids qualified even if they need it and over half my building is bilingual so weíll always be disproportionately low.


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Adverse Childhood Experiences
Old 08-09-2018, 08:45 AM
 
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Quote:
I think itís ACES (Adverse Childhood Experiences) and people are diagnosing learning disabilities and OHI such as ADD/ADHD when itís really the ACES. This just came up in a workshop I went to.


GreyhoundGirl, can you tell me a little more about this workshop? I know that we have to make sure that environmental factors aren't the primary cause of a learning disability. It would be nice if that same type of logic could be applied to ACES and some OHI cases.
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Old 08-09-2018, 11:54 AM
 
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Good points from all. I hadn't thought about schools that might have high special Ed numbers because these are the students that are left behind in school choice options. I do think we are over qualifying students and not always ruling out the environmental factors (and ELL) as significant contributors to lack of educational progress. Elementary Resource Room numbers are going through the roof in my area with many students qualifying in social/emotional as well as academics. There really needs to be more layers off support and special Ed shouldn't be the end goal because supports are lacking! I have very few "classic" LD students on my caseload anymore and I miss them!
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