Advice on Student Hurting Staff - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      Special Education

Advice on Student Hurting Staff

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Alice_XI
 
 
Guest

Alice_XI
 
 
Guest
Advice on Student Hurting Staff
Old 08-28-2018, 05:46 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

Hello everyone. I need some advice regarding a student that has been injuring myself and my staff.

I teach in a multi-needs classroom in a public school, with 10 students. My student ability range is from moderate to profound. Traditionally I have managed a bevy of academic, hygienic, behavioral, and emotional/social behaviors. My staff and I are trained in CPI.

However, the student in question is one I feel is not appropriate for a public school setting.

First of all, in his middle school setting he was in a classroom that was staffed at an almost one to one ratio, however he does not have a one to one TA on his IEP. This is an extreme mistake, as he needs assistance in hygienic, safety, and behavioral day-to-day functioning. One month into extended school year, I put in the paperwork request for him to be officially designated as a one to one student. At this point, he had reached an average of 50 aggressive incidences to staff per summer school day (1/2 of regular school day). These aggressive acts included biting, pushing/shoving, scratching, and intense pinching. In one case, he reached out to a female paraprofessionals chest and twisted her breast.

In the words of his mother, “he does not respect women.” It is at the end of August right now, and at his domain meeting she said, “I am just worried about the safety of the other students.” However, confusingly, she does not want him to have a one to one paraprofessional.

In my daily classroom functioning, I have to designate two teaching assistants to make sure that, A.) Both paraprofessionals are as safe as possible and do not go home covered in copious black and blue marks and B.) That he does not steal food, aggress on other students or staff, or elope from the classroom or building.

The paraprofessional that is working with him this week emailed me pictures of her black and blue marks from working with him. They are all over her arms, back, and stomach.

In the lunchroom, he has terrified the lunch ladies by injuring staff trying to prevent him from stealing cookies. However, on his IEP, one of his goals is to eat appropriately in the cafeteria. Today, one of them offered to call the school officer to assist, but my paraprofessional felt pressured to them it was not necessary.

It does not help that he also screams as a stim, and every sensory approach we have attempted has only worked for a minute or less. We can hear his screaming from almost across the school (and, again, large public high school) and it is impacting the health of one other student in my classroom. That student has had multiple bowel movement accidents due to anxiety, as even with headphones he is sensitive to noise. He also refuses to eat throughout the school day when that student is nearby. To give that student a break, I have been letting him eat in the classroom with me during my own lunch.

Needless to say, actual direct instruction is nearly impossible when loud high-pitched screaming is occurring for almost 1/2 hour straight, in repetitive bursts.

I have attempted to consult with my team to develop strategies to work with the student and manage his behaviors, however they seem to either be the recipient of aggression, and/or they do not have any ideas. They also tell me that this will take time; however, I only see his behavior is getting worse and worse over time.

That being said, programmatically I do not feel that he is appropriate for my classroom. However my supervisor does not believe this to be the case. He believes the issue to be in my programming, and is more of the “wait and see” philosophy.

I am extremely concerned that they are waiting for us to be severely injured before considering a more restrictive placement. A year and a half ago, I had to wait almost half of the year before a student who had given three staff three separate concussions was moved to a private placement setting. While I believe in putting the needs of the student first in most cases, I also feel that staff should not feel scared for their safety when they come to work. The needs of the staff need to also be a concern, and not an afterthought.

So, I am hoping that some of you have advice for either how to get the screaming to stop, or how to convince my supervisor that this is an actual safety concern and should be addressed sooner rather than later. I am collecting as much data as I possibly can including photo evidence, however I feel that they are not taking me seriously.

Thank you all for your advice and your time.

TLDR: How can I get my supervisor to take my concerns about classroom safety seriously, as there is a student who is injuring staff to the point of visible deep bruising and red marks.


  Reply With Quote

ElemSped13 ElemSped13 is offline
 
Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 569
Senior Member

ElemSped13
 
Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 569
Senior Member

Old 08-29-2018, 04:41 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

First of all, I am so sorry you are dealing with this and amazed you and/or your paras have not quit. Do you have a union? If you do, contact them asap.

Did the previous one on one person in his last school receive similar physically aggressive assaults? Is he reacting to the environment change or escalating with age and teen hormones? What on earth does his mom do?

Honestly, I would tell your supervisor to come spend a day "showing" you what your programming should look like. Make them lead and then I bet you will hear a different response. Our most challenging kids remained ours until they did something major in front of or to district staff.

Are you all reporting each injury to work comp? If not, start reporting each injury and take tons of pics.

It sounds like a nightmare and well above what should be allowed. Please check back and I hope you get a resolution before someone is seriously injured.
ElemSped13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Haley23 Haley23 is online now
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 5,790
Senior Member

Haley23
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 5,790
Senior Member

Old 08-29-2018, 06:19 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

I agree with the pp. Contact your union if you have one. File for workers comp each and every time you are injured, even if it's something that will heal without medical intervention. The inconvenience of dealing with all of the paperwork plus putting the idea in their heads that there is potential for an expensive medical situation at some point may make a higher up think twice.

I assume you are already doing this, but kill your supervisor with documentation and data. I'm in a mild/mod. setting and have had a violent kid who just screams all day for 3 days (he had WAY more hours than we typically do on the IEP, but b/c half of them were in class hours he still fell in the 80-100% in gen ed setting), and I already have 10 page of single spaced documentation- problem solving meetings, ABC data, observation notes, interventions being tried, etc. I basically just wear my sped director down with it and make it impossible for her to say, "But have you tried _______?"

I know this isn't allowed in some places, but if you're allowed to have parent volunteers in your sped setting, I'd think about inviting parents in for some sort of celebration, mini performance, or other activity. If they see the safety concerns they are likely to complain, which sadly often has a lot more impact than teachers complaining.
Haley23 is online now   Reply With Quote
TAOEP TAOEP is offline
 
Joined: Feb 2017
Posts: 1,149
Senior Member

TAOEP
 
Joined: Feb 2017
Posts: 1,149
Senior Member
Nightmare
Old 08-29-2018, 06:22 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

Alice,

I am amazed at how calmly and objectively you are in presenting the details of this nightmare. Has a behavior specialist been called in to do a detailed behavior analysis? Clearly at this point the services provided to this student are inadequate/inappropriate. Be sure to keep detailed data documenting that the student is not meeting academic and other IEP goals because of the interference of behavior issues.

Some random thoughts:

Can your union get its attorney to write a letter to the school board/superintendent putting them on notice that your working conditions are unsafe? You definitely want to have written evidence that administrators are aware of the problem.

Definitely file worker's comp forms for every injury. Perhaps if the cost becomes more expensive than providing proper services/placement, something will change.

I believe that any member of the IEP team has the right to request a meeting to reconsider the IEP. Officially request a meeting.

I wonder what would happen if every time someone was injured in the classroom, you called the office to send someone down to relieve the injured person to go see the school nurse--or to their own doctor or the ER.

If there is a significant injury, you could contact the police and file assault charges. Oh--is there a police officer assigned to the school? If so, talk with him/her.

To me, you sound like an absolutely professional, highly competent, and caring teacher. You are advocating for yourself and your paras, but also for all of your students, including the out-of-control one. It is time to escalate your efforts.
TAOEP is offline   Reply With Quote
Spoofyone
 
 
Guest

Spoofyone
 
 
Guest
Incident report
Old 09-21-2018, 07:23 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

You need to file incident reports each time you have one and send it right to the office. After 3 I think an iep or manifest determination must be considered. What is happening sounds illegal. Does this kid have a BSP? Wheres the school psych
She needs to help you too, and the principal.


  Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
Special Education
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 09:19 AM.

Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net