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hiker1 hiker1 is offline
 
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Discouraged
Old 06-19-2010, 10:08 AM
 
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How many of you sped teachers work hard with your class for several years and see them flourish then become disappointed when you discover that their new teacher doesn't really like their job, doesn't really do much in the way of educating the students? I am sick over the idea that all of the hard work that I put into the kiddos will be undone because the next teacher doesn't individualize, relies heavily on the use of calculators, multiplication, addition/subtraction charts (when they have already mastered these facts) shows NO nuturing or compassion whatsoever. Then ignores the lower functioning or more needy kids and lets the aide to whatever with them. Makes me sick. Makes me want to tell the parents to move out of the district so that they get a better education. Admin seems clueless yet all other staff members can see what is going on. Thanks for letting me vent.


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I understand
Old 06-19-2010, 02:03 PM
 
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your emotions....I have a coworker who does that and I end up trying to do damage control. Its frustrating and makes me want to give up somedays...all we can hope for is a solid foundation with us will help make connections later on...the kids are not mature enough to demand better....
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That is tough
Old 06-19-2010, 03:13 PM
 
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if she really is a bad teacher, that really sucks. But maybe she has a different perspective due to the students being older by the time she gets them.

I find that I am letting my 4th and 5th graders do more and more with the calculators and tables. Ideally, they will learn their basic math facts...but at some point, you also have to be realistic and realize that it may be something they will not ever get a handle on. I can't move on with the higher thinking skills if they are hanging up on the basics. I eventually decided that I would rather teach the adaptive skills re: technology and helps and move on with the HOT skills.

As far as her level of compassion, our MS teacher is pretty tough seeming/acting. Not because she has no compassion or nuturing but because she has a different style than I do AND she feels that it will not help them to "coddled" in the Middle school grades.

At least be glad you have them first.
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Old 06-19-2010, 06:37 PM
 
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Yes, I am glad that I have them first. I realize that some students do need to use calculators and other devices/methods, but what really irks me is when I have them, I teach the skills and some not all , do not need to rely on the calculator. They can divide, multiply by skip counting, and can add and subtract with and without remainders. Then suddenly they leave my class and for some reason begin to rely heavily on a times table chart. I do realize that some of the students are older and don't need as much nuturing, but there are always a few "tender" students that need extra support for their emotional well being. It's just not happening. I don't complain or brag, but I feel horrible when a former student's parent comes up to me and says' 'Can't Johnny be in your class again, can't you move up with him? I'm not easy on the kiddos, I understand their needs, and make them work to their potential.
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Old 06-19-2010, 09:47 PM
 
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I understand so well. Its so disheartening sometimes. For quite a few years I taught the lower-age group... I'd have them for 3 years. Then they'd go to the next teacher, who had them only (thankfully) for a year before they went up to the next teacher who would have them for 3 years. And the teacher who was the next level up ... YIKES. In fact, my district went through THREE of them during the years I was there, and all of them... well, it broke my heart to send my kids up to them. I worked so hard with my class, taught them a lot, loved on them like crazy, nurtured them... and then they went up to the next class and it was right down the hall from me so I saw them all the time and would hear the teacher yelling at them, one of the teachers LOST them frequently (these were special ed multi-handicapped babies!!)...and many things like that.

I am REALLY sorry this is hard on you and on your students.


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Assuming Middle School
Old 06-20-2010, 04:09 AM
 
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Of course I don't know the total situation but...

I am a MS sped teacher... cross categorical..which is draining and I teach kids in a pull out math situation...

Elementary teachers need to remember that MS and HS run on a totally different situation... I have the students 57 minutes per day...that is it...there is so much they need to learn and they are done learning how to learn...they are learning specifics in math and reading..

I use to feel the same way...but I was spinning my wheels most days...and had to move on... I have to start assuming they either know the facts/skills or that they don't and have to figure out how to move beyond!

Anyway...I think in our own ways we all work hard!
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Close your door and teach
Old 06-22-2010, 08:53 AM
 
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I am an aide and I have seen exactly what you are describing. But, my goal is to put in 100% and do my job. At the end of the day, I go home and leave my job at the job. My job etc. stop when I leave school. All of my energy goes to my family, friends, etc. Given that...

But, how do you resolve the issues that you described--I don't know. If parents are not fully involved --such is what happens. My child is LD--and I am fully involved but also understand the difficult role of special. ed. teachers. Each year, and by working as a para, I am more prepared and fully aware of his needs and his progress. But, I work closely with the teacher and hold my child accountable. My child is almost at grade level reading due to the work of the teachers, home life. etc. Thank God!

At the end of the day, you have to focus on the students you are working with--not on the ones who have moved on. If you have the guts to tell parents to follow-through, investigate and ask questions, "go for it." You may pray a high price for such.

As a parent, I would greatly appreciate it if a former teacher let's me know that my child is being academically neglected. But, I would work hard to support the new teacher, ask how I can collaborate with the teacher to ensure my child's success, etc. Even the most difficult teachers will appreciate this type of parental involvement. I feel like that I need to give 100% as a parent and give 100% of my support to the new teacher.

You make a lot of good points--but you have to close your door and teach unless you have a strong administration who is willing to work with you--even so--you may want to be careful. I find that the students who are the most neglected are those with little or no parental involvement. This is only in rare cases Yet, if a parent is involved--those IEP goals are quickly progressing and being monitored by both parent and teacher.

You will drive yourself crazy --you have a heart. In reality, there is so much you can do. I think all teachers have hearts- some or just so overwhelmed. Close your door and teach--knowing you are putting in 100% and letting it all go when you get in your car at the end of the day and drive home. This may be the only way you will survive. Other teachers will learn from you.
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Don't underestimate yourself...
Old 07-02-2010, 11:08 PM
 
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You have accomplished more than you know and it sounds like you worked hard to help your students become lifelong learners! I don't believe it's possible for someone to undo the solid foundation you have built...and kids are resilient too! I'm sure that many of us have had experiences with teachers that weren't quite up to the challenge and yet look at where we are.
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