Morning meeting - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      Special Education

Morning meeting

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
amm0327 amm0327 is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2013
Posts: 1
New Member

amm0327
 
Joined: Nov 2013
Posts: 1
New Member
Morning meeting
Old 07-21-2016, 09:04 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

I was wondering what other teachers include in their morning meeting and how to keep the students engaged. This will be my 2ND year teaching in a self contained classroom with 1St-6th grade students who have autism. Last year I included a lot of calendar activities and it was really difficult to keep the students engaged. This year I would like to do more social skills hitting more on IEP goals and leaving out the traditional calendar time activities and only going over the date quickly. Is this a good idea or do y'all think the calendar activities are really important?


amm0327 is offline   Reply With Quote

Lakeside's Avatar
Lakeside Lakeside is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Posts: 4,974
Senior Member

Lakeside
 
Lakeside's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2009
Posts: 4,974
Senior Member

Old 07-21-2016, 10:32 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

I agree with you that social skills stuff will be more important than traditional calendar stuff. Depending on communication levels, you could do a "This weekend, I...." sort of thing on Mondays to practice conversation patterns. - Someone tells what they did, someone gets to ask a question, etc.
Lakeside is offline   Reply With Quote
d0rkablex2 d0rkablex2 is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Posts: 69
Junior Member

d0rkablex2
 
Joined: Jun 2010
Posts: 69
Junior Member
Responsive Classroom
Old 07-21-2016, 10:48 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

I always struggled to engage my self-contained students in morning meeting as well when it was just traditional calendar activities. Last year my school adopted the "Responsive Classroom" approach to behavior and a very big component of the program is the Morning Meeting. (If you google Responsive Classroom Morning Meeting) you will find a TON of resources. It is absolutely perfect for students who need to work on social skills. I had a class of first graders with autism and they loved morning meeting and were almost always engaged. The meeting has 4 major components (that I just copied off their website for you):

Greeting: Students and teachers greet one other by name and practice offering hospitality.
Sharing: Students share information about important events in their lives. Listeners often offer empathetic comments or ask clarifying questions.
Group Activity: Everyone participates in a brief, lively activity that fosters group cohesion and helps students practice social and academic skills (for example, reciting a poem, dancing, singing, or playing a game that reinforces social or academic skills).
Morning Message: Students read and interact with a short message written by their teacher. The message is crafted to help students focus on the work they’ll do in school that day.

There are ENDLESS amounts of ideas for greetings, sharing, and group activities all over the internet, especially on TeachersPayTeachers, and a lot of them are free and require zero prep or materials. I didn't ALWAYS do a group activity in my meeting due to time, but I always did a greeting, a sharing and a morning message. I made the morning message a structured academic time that also prepared the students for their day. For example, the message would tell them about their schedule for the day and activities they needed to be prepared for, but it would also have grammatical errors in it that they needed to fix or words spelled wrong for them to fix. I was able to tie in pretty much any ELA concept to the morning message if I got creative enough. For the greeting, I had a jar with popsicle sticks in it with various greeting options on it. Most of the greetings you'll find online sound super-fun, but would be almost impossible to replicate in a spec. ed classroom. For the majority of the year I stuck to very basic greetings that worked on basic social skills like eye contact, using a person's name, and turning your body towards the person you're talking to. A big favorite was "fist bump and say hi." I also usually did the greeting and the sharing together to save time. For example, the prompt would be "Fist bump and say hi to your neighbor and ask them what their favorite color is." Then the person next to them would have to fist bump and reply saying "Hi *name*! My favorite color is blue" and then turn to the next person and say "Hi *name*! What's your favorite color?" It really worked on asking and answering questions. Hope this helps!
d0rkablex2 is offline   Reply With Quote
pdxteacher's Avatar
pdxteacher pdxteacher is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 3,091
Senior Member

pdxteacher
 
pdxteacher's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 3,091
Senior Member

Old 07-21-2016, 06:30 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

Hhhmm... I guess I'm the odd one out on this one. We do morning greetings where I say good morning and talk to each student for about a minute (I have ten students). Then we do "calendar" time, but really it's a bunch of math. Each student has their own binder, and they have the traditional month and date pages. But then they also have weather, tally mark, counting, and number of the day math pages to complete. Most of these pages are laminated so the students can complete the work with a dry-erase marker that can be erased at the end. We count the days we've been in school, and that number for the day is number we base all of our work around. I modify the pages based on each student's skill level, but the skills we cover are:

- writing the number digits
- writing the number words
- place value and expanded form
- coloring base ten pictures
- +/- 1, +/- 10, +/- 100
- counting forwards/backwards by 1
- counting forwards/backwards by 10
- time (drawing a given time on a clock)
- money (make the number of the day with money)

I teach 6th - 8th graders, with skills ranging from k - 5th, my paras help specific students with specific tasks, and some understand more of the concepts than others, but everyone is working for 35ish minutes. Since I don't teach every student during math every day (small group math rotations), this gives me a chance to quickly observe where each student is at with math skills.
pdxteacher is offline   Reply With Quote
yeahformorni
 
 
Guest

yeahformorni
 
 
Guest

Old 07-23-2016, 11:50 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

I teach secondary students with autism, profound cognitive disabilities and significant behavior issues. Almost all of my students are non-verbal. I have 5 students. The students and I love morning meeting and we spend about 1.5 hours on it. We do morning meeting on the smartboard. It is great practice for being in a group, taking turns and attending. They practice recognizing their names, using their name and sight words in sentence frames, letting us know how they feel, recognizing coins, basic counting, letter recognition, social skills and SEL activities, making choices, matching, sorting , using technology and more. I do a calendar mostly to prime for any special occasions or days off. My students have IEP goals that are practiced during morning meeting. I create new slides or alter slides as my students make progress and to make sure that they focus on the content of what I want them to learn not just memorizing the position of things. Morning Meeting also tells me a lot about where my students are at for the day and what concepts they are strong at or struggle with. Yeah for morning meeting!


  Reply With Quote
lilrhody lilrhody is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2016
Posts: 3
New Member

lilrhody
 
Joined: Sep 2016
Posts: 3
New Member
Positive
Old 10-01-2016, 06:24 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

Wow, sounds great!
lilrhody is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
Special Education
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 06:34 AM.

Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net