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MsTreble MsTreble is offline
 
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Is that all there is?
Old 03-01-2019, 06:01 AM
 
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So I have been teaching at only one school for 5 years. I've had ups and downs, gains and losses, and all the typical educator issues. For lack of a better phrase, I'm burnt out. I started my teaching career here and have seen many changes with staff, admin, and standards. I've also felt less appreciated by students and parents but more stressed due to a bigger workload which doesn't help. Other staff members have issues with our school or education but just take it as it is and deal with it. I on the other hand want more and better for my career. When addressed by the principal about the staff issues he likes to bring up "The grass isn't always greener on the other side" or "others won't treat you as well as I do" and I feel that's rather narcissistic but more than anything, I hope it's not true. So my question is, Is that all there is? I've gone back and forth about going to another school but statements like that make me wary. Honestly I couldn't continue in education if this is the best that it gets. So...I'm reaching out for advice on the matter since I don't know where else to turn.


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I was There Last Year
Old 03-01-2019, 06:52 AM
 
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Hi, I taught at only one school for six years (this is my seventh year teaching) and like you, I saw admin changes, staff changes, curriculum changes, and a bigger workload. I applied to a rival school and everyone at my current school told me the same thing about the grass not being greener. I did have a nice principal, cushy job for the most part, and felt comfortable there. However, I wanted more for my career. The kids were getting worse, the parents were getting worse, and the workload was expected to get worse because of central office. So, I moved. This new school has a bigger workload than I could imagine, a hard to work with principal, more entitled kids with even more entitled parents, and I feel lonely almost everyday. But, do I regret my decision? NO. I needed to find out what was out there, and so do you. I wanted more and I do not regret my decision. I am sad that this is what education has come to. Even if your move doesn't work out, you have to know that you wanted more and so you sought more out. I haven't decided what my next move will be. A part of me says not to go back because that is a step backward, but the other part of me knows I am not happy here at this district. You should reach out to another school because you could probably land opportunities that your current school can't give you. Although I am not happy with this new campus or district, I do have more opportunities here to get me out of the classroom or education all together within the next three years.

You said so yourself that if this is all there is then you can't continue in education. So make the change.
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Old 03-01-2019, 07:21 AM
 
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You sound like I did five years ago. I decided to try another district. I canít say I love it where Iím at now (like I was hoping). Some days, I honestly do wish I were at my old school mostly because I miss the teachers there. I underestimated how big of an impact they had on my happiness.

Youíll never know until you try, and lifeís too short to always wonder! If there is a particular school youíre interested in, would there be anyway to get a feel for how things are there?

Good luck!
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Old 03-01-2019, 08:09 AM
 
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I agree that the grass isn't always greener as with EVERYTHING in life. But that's the risk you take. The thing is to think ahead of what you'll do if it's just as bad or worse if you decide to make that change.

When people have the feelings you do, maybe/hopefully just being in a different (not necessarily better) situation is all it takes to feel better about it. But of course, I HOPE it's BETTER if you decide to make that change.

What would you do if you don't teach at all?
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Testyteach Testyteach is offline
 
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I ask that same question too.
Old 03-01-2019, 12:04 PM
 
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I went to a new school 4 years ago cause I got married and needed to relocate. The transition was hard as I taught at the same school 10 years prior and the same grade level. It turned out I like the higher pay since I teach in the city, but everything else I don't like much at all including traffic, co-workers, workload, and etc. Then after all the hardwork trying to make the best of it, my hubby and I didn't work out and got divorced. I'm now wanting to move back to my old district even with pay cut, and I'm moving back the week after school is out. I'm hoping that I will be as happy as I was before. My advice is to try a different place. It's a risk, but you'll never know unless you try.


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Old 03-01-2019, 12:14 PM
 
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If you are unhappy, try something else.

Before you make the change, talk to others at the schools where you would be interested in teaching. See what they have to say about their school. That would be a good place to start.

Are you happy with other aspects of your life? Is the school the true issue? I mention this because I have one friend who has left two schools, and she has been equally unhappy at all three schools. Others do not seem to share her feelings. Knowing her on a personal level, I see that she tends to perpetually disgruntled. In her case, moving schools is doing noting to help her out.
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Haley23 Haley23 is offline
 
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Old 03-01-2019, 05:03 PM
 
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My answer is a bit different based on the experiences I've had. I enjoyed my first school, but absolutely hated where I was living. There were also things about the position that I didn't like (which, in hindsight, were the tiniest/most insignificant things).

I moved to a bigger city to teach and actually thought I'd landed my dream job- I'd been teaching sped, but had always wanted to be a classroom teacher and was hired for gen ed in my favorite grade level. I was hired early in the spring, so at the time it looked like there was very low turnover and I felt like I really connected with the interview committee.

Over the summer, the P who hired me left and a new P was hired. She was AWFUL. I could write a novel about what a narcissistic nut she was. Just a tiny smattering of her antics:
-Almost daily walkthroughs were she'd leave 2-3 pages of only negative comments, including nit picky things such as "your desk is messy." She told us halfway through the year that she'd make positive comments when our inner city school was 80% proficient on state testing.
-Constant racist remarks/actions (telling staff members to "Go back to Mexico," telling a child who hit his head on the playground that she'd help him when he told her what he needed in English, etc.)
-Stealing my lesson plans off the copier and claiming that my teammate tried to turn them in as her own on her eval
-Planting things in teacher's rooms to get them in trouble/get rid of them

I could come up with 50 more things. Even though I loved my new location, I would have paid money to go back to my first school. I'm thankfully now in a better school- TBH, not as good as my first, but now that I've had the experience at my second school I know what a "bad school" is truly like and don't sweat the small stuff anymore!

I've thought about seeing if there is anything better than my current school/position out there, but now I'm terrified of jumping from the frying pan into the fire. I'd really think about how much you want to take a chance on the grass being greener. Make sure you're interviewing the school team as much as they interview you and I'd insist on spending some time at the school shadowing prior to accepting anything.
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Old 03-02-2019, 04:05 AM
 
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There is another post thatís very similar to this one, so check that one out too! In that post, someone mentioned that theyíre are going to be things wrong at every school- you need to find what you can live with.

Teachers are burning out way quicker now. I actually paid for a government resume to be written because I was so burnt out I wanted to leave education. When I talked to the union, they said teachers arenít remaining at the same school for their entire career anymore- and that itís ok! You need to find the best match for you.

My first school was very high poverty, very high ESOL, my teammates were very nasty to each other, my principal would get involved in drama, etc. So I transferred after 7 years. Iíve been at my current school for 4 years. The first two I continued to teach 2nd, and fought hard against moving to 3rd- but it was a good change for me. Itís the best team Iíve ever worked with, and it really refreshed my perspective. But Iíve realized that my passion is intervention, especially that high ESOL population I left 😜 so I got my ESOL certification, and just got hired as an ESOL teacher at a brand new school!

So find out your passion- sometimes the grass IS greener, sometimes itís not. Sometimes admin goals donít align with your personal beliefs, sometimes they do. Some schools you do just get ďstuckĒ and donít really allow growth- and this sounds like where youíre at. Do you think a change in grade or position at your current school would refresh you? Or do you need a total reboot?
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Old 03-02-2019, 04:34 AM
 
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Burnout could be a possibility. Or maybe you're bored. You've been doing the same thing for 5 years; perhaps what you really need is something new to do. If you're truly not ready to move jobs yet, maybe look at adding something energizing to your plate--grad school, some PD that you've been interested in, implementing some new ideas or techniques in your classroom, shifting jobs within your building, taking on a new assignment in your school, etc. (You could always do something new outside school, but that might not address the boredom/burnout you feel at work.)
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Old 03-02-2019, 06:31 AM
 
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Just saw this in a teacher group on facebook:


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Summerwillcom Summerwillcom is online now
 
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Some schools are def better than
Old 03-02-2019, 02:35 PM
 
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others. If you are burnt out, could you take a year's leave of absence? You could check out what other options are open to you.
Schools often change. A good school can turn into a bad 1 over night w/ a P change or vice versa. ( Staff and program changes can do it too.)
I think the workload and expectations of most of us have increased greatly over the yrs.
Where ever we teach ( rich school/ poor school, city/ boonies), there are pros and cons.
You need to know what you want exactly and look for it. Ya never know, it might be out there!
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