Mosaic CHP 2...questions - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      Sunflower Room


Mosaic CHP 2...questions

>

 
 
Thread Tools
grade4curlyQ's Avatar
grade4curlyQ grade4curlyQ is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 574
Senior Member

grade4curlyQ
 
grade4curlyQ's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 574
Senior Member
Mosaic CHP 2...questions
Old 01-11-2007, 05:12 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

I was wondering, after reading 2 chapters in Mosaic, I saw a lot of my old practices critiqued and couldn't help but wonder if doing the monthly genre projects couldn't still be helpful? It was mentioned that they (or projects like them) simply serve as more of an extension rather than provoking meta cognitive strategies (which I was looking forward to reading about).

I first heard of these strategies back in September on thereadinglady site. I did a lot of reading and thinking and began to use them one by one. The children are making some relevant connections, they are predicting and proving on a daily basis in Science & SS, using some fix-up strategies.....and all, but until I started reading this book, I didn't realize how archaic some of my practices have been!

Though I do see an improvement in my students reading abilities since I have been using some of those strategies, I can't help but wonder a million things, namely, is it a waste of time to bother with the monthly projects? They have made the students more aware of and knowledgeable in literature as a whole. Yet, it seems that the emphasis should really be placed on continuously developing their thought processes. Is this to the exclusion of book projects? Will this be addressed later?

I get the main idea though. Reevaluating my approach to their instruction is the key. Reevaluating my own thought processes as I teach them to become critical thinkers about what they read.


grade4curlyQ is offline  

BookMuncher's Avatar
BookMuncher BookMuncher is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Blog Entries: 9
Senior Member

BookMuncher
 
BookMuncher's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Senior Member
projects
Old 01-13-2007, 06:49 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

I hear what you're saying... before reading Reading with Meaning and Strategies that Work, there were a lot of things I thought were best practice, but have since thrown out.

For example, I no longer do centers or very many full-class reading activities. My take-away learning from these authors has been that to create life-long readers, we need to stop doing so many activities AROUND reading and just read and think about reading. An adult, after reading a non-fiction article on frogs, wouldn't go home and make a frog diorama or bag puppet and sadly, that's what we do at a lot of centers.

I have overhauled the look of my schedule so much since my first year. Now, the whole langauge arts block consists of the kids doing real reading and real writing. The parts where I'm teaching whole class are very short and concise and clear in their modeling. Most of the real teaching is done one-on-one or in small groups. My readers are soaring because of it.

As for projects- I really think it depends on the project. If they were maybe keeping track of all the books they read in a genre and then making connections between them and generalizations about the genre, then maybe teaching the rest of the class, I think that's very valuable. Think about what your ratio of decorating/creating to thinking is. I'm sure you'll form your own opinions about best practice as you read more. You're already on such a great start because of all the reflections you've been writing concerning your reading!!
BookMuncher is offline  
grade4curlyQ's Avatar
grade4curlyQ grade4curlyQ is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 574
Senior Member

grade4curlyQ
 
grade4curlyQ's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 574
Senior Member
More reflections and questions
Old 01-13-2007, 02:57 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

Thank-you for your addition to the discussion bookmuncher! It means alot to have someone who has read this book and is practicing the methods share their thoughts in such a valuable way! P

I talk about the book with my colleagues at work and they jokingly say that when I'm finished I should teacher a staff development on it! My thoughts on that are absolutely not! The value of learning it for myself and sharing it are not the same if they are not reading it themselves. There are so many layers to this (like a 7 layer dip but multiplied by 7000!) that can only be appreciated through self discovery. I couldn't do it the justice it deserves even after a few years of practice and this is just a few months of using the methods and just a week of reading the book. I so wish some of my colleague were reading it with me!

I see where the readers workshop recommends the following:
* 15-20 minutes presenting a mini lesson that models a specific strategy explicitly
*15 minutes meeting with a small group which may be struggling
*20 minutes on 1-to-1 conferences with at least 4-5 students daily - having them demonstrate the skills they have acquired or discussing questions they may have
*5-10 minutes whole group reviewing the modeled strategy of the day/week/month with the new book that lends itself to the strategy

I have an hour and a half for reading daily being self-contained. I could easily work in this structured readers workshop without a hitch. I have been devoting 30 minutes to DEAR time daily and do not wish to lose that time as it could become (has for a week now) buddy reading/conferences and book study time.

My question is rather embarrassing to ask ! Where is the time for work that has to be counted for grades? I've been teaching for 6 years and have never used the basal exclusively. I've pulled chapter books, leveled readers, and a variety of other books to teach the skills (main idea & details..........). Boy I thought I was on the right track! Argh! Better learned now though.

What I see going on around me in other rooms is an emphasis on following the basal in an order that focuses on teaching cause & effect, sequence.......using the workbook pages and tests on a weekly basis. I've been fortunate that I'm not in a system that requires me to follow the basal in a specific order.....story by story. Still, the question of grades begs to be answered. Where do they come from and how is that portion of reading class scheduled? I'm not making a concerted effort to hold on to old ideas. Yet I'm not one that gives worksheets in reading either.
grade4curlyQ is offline  
BookMuncher's Avatar
BookMuncher BookMuncher is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Blog Entries: 9
Senior Member

BookMuncher
 
BookMuncher's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Senior Member
grades
Old 01-13-2007, 03:14 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

I teach first grade, so my day is bound to look differently. What kinds of things do you take grades from now?

Is there a way to still have a 20 minute skill time where they are writing aobut their reading?

I have a rubric that I use to show parents where their child is on the reading continuum. Your guided reading, book group, and conference notes would help you with this. It depends on how flexible your district is with where and how you get your grades. I've attached my rubric for language arts, first marking period. Yours, obviously would look entirely different at a 4th grade level. When we used to give ), S+, S, S-, and U, each one of the categories cooresponded to a letter grade. Wherever the child had the most highlighted indicators, showed their level. You could coorelate this with the regular letter grades, or you could correlate it with something else that is then taken into account in your letter grade.

You could also take grades from reading response journals and kids own self-assessment of how they are doing as readers.

The fact that you are already devoting 30 minutes to DEAR time is awesome-- you don't have to do a whole overhaul of your schedule. However, if you are going to start reader's workshop, I would be clear with your kids that there is no more DEAR and that there is this thing called Reader's Workshop. It's important to differentiate what goes on at this time of day. They need to understand that RW is a time to think about themselves as readers and do whatever they can do best grow their reading muscles.

I look forward to hearing more about your new journey!
Attached Files
File Type: doc Classroom Performance Rubric, LA.doc (128.5 KB, 203 views)
BookMuncher is offline  
grade4curlyQ's Avatar
grade4curlyQ grade4curlyQ is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 574
Senior Member

grade4curlyQ
 
grade4curlyQ's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 574
Senior Member
A Start........I think?
Old 01-14-2007, 06:51 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

Thanks for the rubric! I can definitely adapt that to fit my 4th grade class. I like to give credit to those whose ideas I have adapted, so if you would like to email me a private message with your name, I'll be more than happy to insert it in my final product.

I don't know what I am going to do about DEAR and RW scheduling at the 4th grade level, but am pondering the solution.

I've been thinking about your suggestion to look at my ratio of decorating/creating to thinking. There has been too much time devoted to decorating/creating.

I also took a look at my monthly genre projects, the checklists, and the rubrics. The children have learned so much about the characteristics of each genre that they have had discussions comparing and contrasting the similarities of a fantasy to science fiction. One young lady even pointed out why one of our classroom library books should be located in a different basket giving an explanation that was right on the mark! For these reasons, I plan to keep the projects as part of an independent book/genre study. What does need to happen though: I need to develop a self-assessment form that is completed along with the project, is monitored by myself and the student periodically as the independent study occurs, and takes into consideration the 'thinking' skill of study as well. This will be my summer project!

I've got a good idea of where to begin aligning the self-assessment using Mosaic. In Mosaic, CHP 5, it mentions that "students gradually assume responsibility for modeling their own conclusions about importance in texts they are reading." If I start the year with schema development, devoting approximately 1 month to the skill, then the genre project for the next month should have a self-assessment form that reinforces what had been explicitly modeled the previous month. Of course, meeting with the children would occur to ensure the proficiency of the gradual assumption of this responsibility (guidance). Does this makes any sense at all? If the next thinking skill to be developed is 'fix-up strategies' or 'connections', the following month the independent genre study will include a self-assessment/monitoring thinking form focused on 'fix-up strategies' or 'connections'. Students will need to have sticky notes to mark the spot in their literature where they used the strategy and then transfer the quoted section to the form with an explanation of what sensory images it stimulated, what connections they made, or what fix-up strategy they used, what questions they had that were answered before, during, and after reading.........

I do not wish to take the instruction of these thinking skills out of context, so please let me know if I am on the right track or if I have batted a strike.

Also, I plan to modify the rubric this weekend and take it to my principal Tuesday to get her approval in using it on a weekly basis in RW. I'll also draft a letter to the parents explaining that this will constitute a weekly grade in reading. I'm thinking this will also keep the parents in the loop of information regarding how grades are derived since they are so used to numerical grades on vocabulary sheets and weekly story tests. I'll invite them to schedule a conference with me if they would like to further discuss this new aspect of my reading instruction as well.

I'm in CHP 7 at this point and have more questions than answers. I like the fact that the authors included mishaps like the sticky notes that the children couldn't remember what they had been thinking when they were on a specific page in their books........room for learning from errors since the easy/simple stuff usually eludes me! I know for a fact, that I will be rereading this book as soon as I finish it, yet using a different colored highlighter so I can see what strikes me the second go round as opposed to the first go round. Or what resonates again and again for me and why. The self-reflective.........making connections known nature of the authors sets a great example.......modeling for us readers!

To answer your question about how my grades are currently derived: genre projects each month, vocabulary WB sheets on grade level and intervention series, a few basal story tests, 'ticket out the door' on skills (cause & effect......), some graphic organizers, .............a watered down version of a basal follower.


grade4curlyQ is offline  
BookMuncher's Avatar
BookMuncher BookMuncher is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Blog Entries: 9
Senior Member

BookMuncher
 
BookMuncher's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Senior Member

Old 01-14-2007, 07:53 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

Quote:
then the genre project for the next month should have a self-assessment form that reinforces what had been explicitly modeled the previous month.
That makes perfect sense and that's the way I teach too... it takes only a day or two for kids to be able to define a strategy and parrot back ways in which that strategy can help a reader. Because of this, many teachers think at that point that the kids know it. But it's the TRANFERANCE to their real reading work that is key. That takes a long time and a lot of one on one attention. In first grade, I devote an entire month of only modeling the strategy in my read alouds, before actually teaching it the next month in reader's workshop (gradual release of responsibility). It's not until the third month that I expect them to begin showing me how they use it in their own reading.

One heads-up that I learned last year about myself: I taught all of the strategies very thoroughly, but at the end of the year, I didn't feel that my kids could talk well about how all of them work together. If I had maybe done 3-4 minilessons at the end of every strategy, connecting them to the previous ones, I think the kids would have seen the connection a little better. So when you make you self-reflection forms, you'd probably be wise to have them build, never losing the first pieces.

The reason I asked about your grades now, is because I wondered if there was any part of it that you saw worth keeping. I think that especially at the upper grade levels, there probably still needs to be a 20-30 minute skill time each day where kids have the opportunity to practice, paper pencil tasks and more concrete skills that reader's workshop might not lend itself to. This would be where you get in you grammar skills, spelling, and maybe even test prep if your school does this. We always have to keep in mind that these kids will be going to a classroom next year that uses the basals and have to take standarized tests and still do need a little practice filling in the blanks.

Don't worry about giving me credit for the rubric... by the time your done it will be yours.
BookMuncher is offline  
grade4curlyQ's Avatar
grade4curlyQ grade4curlyQ is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 574
Senior Member

grade4curlyQ
 
grade4curlyQ's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 574
Senior Member

Old 01-14-2007, 10:11 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

Quote:
I think that especially at the upper grade levels, there probably still needs to be a 20-30 minute skill time each day where kids have the opportunity to practice, paper pencil tasks and more concrete skills that reader's workshop might not lend itself to.
Great! That answers my question about grades!

Quote:
Don't worry about giving me credit for the rubric... by the time your done it will be yours.
How generous of you! I really appreciate it.

I've attached my adapted version of your rubric. I'm sure I will need to make more revisions. Let me know your thoughts.

I will make a concerted effort to remember that connecting the strategies and their uses will help the children comprehend them much better. Super!
Attached Files
File Type: doc Reading Growth Rubric RJ.doc (127.5 KB, 126 views)
grade4curlyQ is offline  
BookMuncher's Avatar
BookMuncher BookMuncher is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Blog Entries: 9
Senior Member

BookMuncher
 
BookMuncher's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Senior Member
looks great!
Old 01-14-2007, 12:27 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #8

Hope the rubric works for you... it looks great! I noticed "connections" on there...Will you be adding the strategies as they are taught?
BookMuncher is offline  
r9miles's Avatar
r9miles r9miles is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,544
Senior Member

r9miles
 
r9miles's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,544
Senior Member
Centers
Old 01-14-2007, 05:46 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #9

I am interested in what your students are doing while you are teaching in small groups if you don't have centers?

I am still doing centers but they are mostly reading without artifacts to produce. I am using the daily five approach. The centers are read to self, read to someone, word work, listening and writing.
r9miles is offline  
BookMuncher's Avatar
BookMuncher BookMuncher is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Blog Entries: 9
Senior Member

BookMuncher
 
BookMuncher's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Senior Member
centers
Old 01-14-2007, 06:02 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #10

I'm not sure if you're asking grade4curlyQ or me, but my kids read while I'm working with small groups. The reading time is split in half, private and partner time and all together it's about 40 minutes of reading. When you add the mini lesson and sharing, it's one hour.


BookMuncher is offline  
kaycee1128 kaycee1128 is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2006
Posts: 483
Senior Member

kaycee1128
 
Joined: Aug 2006
Posts: 483
Senior Member
Grade4curylyQ
Old 01-14-2007, 08:21 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #11

I have been wanting to read Mosaic of Thought ever since I read Debbie Miller's book and after reading your posts I have to now. I have always loved Regie Routman and Lucy Calkins and then last year I discovered Debbie Miller and Kathy Collins and both those books have totally made me a better teacher. Although my philosophy has always been the same...after reading those books I was able to get down to the nitty gritty of a reader's workshop and comprehension strategies that will actually help children and things they will be able to carry with them throughout life as readers. Mosaic of Thought was in our professional library at my school so I am going to get my hands on it this week and maybe I will be able to add something your conversation!!
kaycee1128 is offline  
grade4curlyQ's Avatar
grade4curlyQ grade4curlyQ is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 574
Senior Member

grade4curlyQ
 
grade4curlyQ's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 574
Senior Member
Welcome!
Old 01-15-2007, 05:45 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #12

Welcome Kaycee1128 & r9miles! Talking about this book with other's who have read it and plan to read it along with me was exactly what I was hoping for to make it more meaningful! So glad to have you!

Bookmuncher - I have altered the rubric once again, as I knew I would! Take a look and see. I added 'predict & prove' being that we've been using this since September in science & SS journals daily. I first found out about predict & prove through journaling on GPB's United Streaming. The Directed Reading Thinking Activity (DRTA) is an older professional development video on line. In the video (which I watched at least a dozen times ) a teacher models with a classroom of 5Th graders: how to explore expository non-fiction, how to understand expository non-fiction, she guides them through understanding how to focus on the purpose for reading the material at hand, invites all students to participate, the teacher models predicting and questioning for those reluctant to volunteer, it encourages independent thinking, she models and demonstrates how to link new knowledge to prior knowledge, it strengthens inferential and evaluative thinking, and it has been flexible and adaptable as it should be fairly simple to carry over into reading class. (It was just about the very same time period that I learned of the 'Good Reader' strategies from the MOSAIC list serve.) I am pretty sure that I shouldn't have started with SS & science texts as expository non-fiction is very challenging to learn the structure of, but it is actually a strength of my class at this time! They can easily point out the text structure and explain why a section of a lesson is organized in a cause & effect format or the other three formats. While I do not think it will be a breeze for them to carry this over into their fictional reading, I do think they are well prepared to take on this task.

Oh, and concerning how to fit RW in w/ GR, I found out about a book "The Daily 5" that gives suggestions on how to fit GR into RW scheduling. Needless to say, my list of 'must reads' just got longer! After Mosaic, I will read 'Strategies that Work' and then 'The Daily 5'. I can see I'll eventually have to read some Debbie Miller, Regie Routman, and Lucy Calkins by the summer time too. Our state middle school association conference is coming up in February. Here, middle school is 4-Th grades (grades 4 & 5 still located in the elementary schools though). One of the sessions is about RW in the middle school. This has me curious as to the format they will be presenting?

In CHP 7, I was engrossed by the analogy of viewing an Impressionist painting to the layers of meaning while reading. While reading "Sideways Stories from Wayside School" to my Th graders earlier this year, I was struck by the juxtaposition and surrealism. I got together with the art teacher and we supplied the students with a sample collection of art pictures that were meant to help them see exactly what the author was trying to convey with words. Although 4Th grade is a 'bit young for this terminology, it inspired SUPER conversations among the students!

We're about to start a figurative language unit and then a poetry unit which will hopefully help them to grow even more and realize as the young lady in MOSAIC did that ".....words paint pictures in the readers mind."

Was the question about what the students are doing while I'm with small groups for me or bookmuncher? My kids are also reading while I'm with small groups. I do not have a perfect system for GR though. I've only just started this year. I have my low group every day for 20 minutes and then alternate between the medium and high groups for the next 20 minutes. The high group comes to me twice a week and the medium group three times a week. If the medium group is not with me, they do CCC for 10 minutes daily and read for the other 30 minutes. I've been devoting a total of 40 minutes to small groups daily. The high group may also choose creative projects to work on twice a week as there are gifted children in that group that need the extension activities to satisfy their creative juices. As I learn more about RW, my schedule and instruction will inevitably change.
Attached Files
File Type: doc Reading Growth Rubric RJ.doc (117.5 KB, 96 views)

Last edited by grade4curlyQ; 01-15-2007 at 05:53 AM.. Reason: missing number
grade4curlyQ is offline  
Miccol71 Miccol71 is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 436
Senior Member

Miccol71
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 436
Senior Member
CurlyQ
Old 01-15-2007, 07:55 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #13

I like how you changed the scoring guide. I'd love to use it.
Miccol71 is offline  
grade4curlyQ's Avatar
grade4curlyQ grade4curlyQ is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 574
Senior Member

grade4curlyQ
 
grade4curlyQ's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 574
Senior Member
Share and Share Alike
Old 01-15-2007, 03:32 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #14

Miccol71........help yourself to the scoring rubric as it has become available through bookmuncher's generosity!

I'm sure I will add 'sensory images' to it after the next 4 weeks. I would like to explore visualization and fine tune it with my class. I think I found a profundity list for the upper grades......thought many of the example book's used by the author would do well for modeling in the 4th grade don't you think? If an 8th grade group was able to envoke sensory images from a picture book..........maybe the same could happen for 4th graders.

I'm reading CHP 9 right now. I had to take a break! My absolute favorite chapter in this book is 7! I was riveted, engrossed, and just like the author mentioned doing while she read a book, I ignored the ringing telephone.

Just Friday I was having a conversation with my colleagues about what they see when they see numbers. It started with me wondering out loud how to get the children to express exactly what was confusing them in terms of math class. I was curious, so I asked my team members if they ever asked a student how they see numbers. They looked puzzled and asked me to clarify. I told them that when I see the number 3, I visualize a diagonal three as it appears on a domino. We all laughed and they said they had never really thought about it. I went on to explain that I see 8 as two rows of 4 on a domino and that still today I sometimes find myself counting by pointing in the air in the motion of the way I see the numbers lined up neatly on domino's. Not finger counting though. Maybe I was taught 'touch counting' or something, but it got us thinking about how the children see numbers and the different ways to represent them. We then discussed larger numbers because they wanted to know how I visualized them being that they can not be represented on domino's! My answer: compatible numbers and clustering of course (if it's mental math)! So I wonder, how do you see numbers?

Through our conversation, we were able to decide that it would help us understand the children's mathematical mind-set if we knew how they visualized numbers and related to them.

Then I read CHP 7 yesterday and today and what an experience it was! Visualizing while reading! For a person who is extremely visual, this was a wonderful experience.........what sounds do you hear? what smells do you smell? I really believe (though I am not finished with the book) that I would do well to start a school year with this visualization. I can see how schema could be developed and build upon it, how making relevant connections could easily stem from it, and even how very auditory students would be listening raptly to explicit modeling by the teacher.

Before I got to the part about the teacher named Todd in 4th grade, I had an idea for my student choice activity list and stopped reading the book to add it to my list. I added a 60 point section that invites the students to:
Create a ‘mental images’ story panel (like a comic strip) or foldable accordion book. Write an explanation of your sensory or emotional images beneath each image that you draw or sketch. You may use pencil, crayon, or colored pencil to draw your images. Make certain you have at least 6 images and give a great deal of details in your explanation of how the images helped you to understand the text better. I'm hoping a student produces an excellent example that I can take pictures of for inspiring students in the future.

Then I got to the part about Todd making forms for the students and areas to express themselves, and thought WOW awesome!

Hope that other book arrives soon.
grade4curlyQ is offline  
Miccol71 Miccol71 is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 436
Senior Member

Miccol71
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 436
Senior Member
CurlyQ
Old 01-15-2007, 03:37 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #15

Have you read The Daily Five? Or is that the one you hope is arriving soon? I was curious about that book.

At my school this year, we were supposed to do a book study on Mosaic of Thought. Because of so many other things, we haven't touched it since September. Your thinking about the book is making me want to go pull it out!

Michelle
Miccol71 is offline  
Miccol71 Miccol71 is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 436
Senior Member

Miccol71
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 436
Senior Member
BookMuncher....
Old 01-15-2007, 03:39 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #16

A big thank you for sharing your scoring guide for reading and math! I like to see what others do.
Miccol71 is offline  
BookMuncher's Avatar
BookMuncher BookMuncher is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Blog Entries: 9
Senior Member

BookMuncher
 
BookMuncher's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Senior Member
visualizatoin
Old 01-15-2007, 03:51 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #17

Teaching schema and connections works best for me-- the kids learn that schema is "in" every thing, because schema is who you are, what you've done "what's in your brain." I do a lot with how schema and mental images go hand in hand. THe kids have to write where their most vivid mental images are in their book and what schema they have that probably enabled them to visualize it so well. For example, in the book Owl Moon, kids have to have schema for snow and more specifically, a calm quiet snowy night- the way the snow sparkles in the moon light, the absolute silence-- to really truly get a good mental image.
BookMuncher is offline  
grade4curlyQ's Avatar
grade4curlyQ grade4curlyQ is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 574
Senior Member

grade4curlyQ
 
grade4curlyQ's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 574
Senior Member
Question
Old 01-17-2007, 03:07 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #18

Initially, I thought the place to start would be schema. It just made sense. Because I related so much to 'images', I began to think the images had to exist or at least the ability to create them had to be stimulated in order to access and connect to the prior knowledge. It was as if the two were so interdependent on one another that they then became essential as one whole.

My 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade colleagues and I have been truly challenged by this! I posed the question them "Is there a distinct difference that would indicate which should be taught first?" The same thing happened with them as did with me. First they were sure that schema had to exist in order to access the images, or the other way around..........we just do not know! We've changed our minds repeatedly. Nonetheless, it has us 'thinking'. I believe I will have to reread both chapters for clarification.

I would like to have seen more dialog examples in the book where children needed help re-sculpting their ideas. I think it's frightening that I may come across a situation in conferencing with a child where I wouldn't know what to do or say. I suppose that's one aspect of the learning process for me?

I've attached some of the posters I've created based on what I've learned in the book and from thereadinglady site.
Also...........profundity list from the same site. (The fonts may need to be adjusted in order for everything to appear on one page. I used curly font and a few others.)
Attached Files
File Type: doc Good Readers Predict & Prove.doc (28.0 KB, 140 views)
File Type: doc Good Readers Make Connections Poster.doc (83.0 KB, 124 views)
File Type: doc Fix Up Poster.doc (25.5 KB, 109 views)
File Type: doc Determining Importance in Expository Non fiction.doc (31.0 KB, 102 views)
File Type: doc A Profundity Book List for Children by Deb.doc (163.0 KB, 114 views)
grade4curlyQ is offline  
BookMuncher's Avatar
BookMuncher BookMuncher is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Blog Entries: 9
Senior Member

BookMuncher
 
BookMuncher's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Senior Member
good thinking!
Old 01-17-2007, 04:43 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #19

You have gotten so much out of that book in such a short amount of time! Your kids are really going to benefit from this!

I'd like to hear more about your mental images/schema debate. You never know, I could be swayed . Here's how I see it now:

Mental images ARE your schema. They are simply pictures, constructed by your own mind by piecing together all that you are and all that you have experienced. In everyday life, the things we see around us, cannot be recieved by our brains without changing/revising/adding onto our pre-existing schema. These day-to-day images (your schema) are what eventually gets pieced together to make mental images when we read or hear a story. The way I see it, it's impossible to have an image without having schema b/c schema is "everything that's in your brain" (that's what I tell my kids).

BUT-- like I said-- I could be persuaded!

Here's a GREAT schema activity that I learned from some Debbie Miller notes--I didn't go to the talk, but someone passed on the notes through the Mosaic listserv.

Choose a topic of interest with your kids-- I did it with lots of things, but our favorite was snowflakes. Tell the kids that in their brain, it's like they have millions of files. They have even more than one file for snow-- they have experiences with snow (show a file folder labeled that way), how snow is formed (show folder), and snowflakes (show folder). When they read about these things, their schema is activated- or turned on.

NOTE: Inside the folders, they should be divided into three categories with permanent marker. One category is just schema, and it needs to be really big. At the bottom, there's a "misconceptions" and a "questions" section.

Before reading: As a class, write things you know about snowflakes on post it notes and stick them in the schema section. Show them that we all have schema like that in our brains already.

Read a non-fiction book on snowflakes and/or study some snowflake material, study pictures, etc...

After reading: Add post it notes of a different color to the pre-existing schema. Try to link things that make sense together by sticking the notes into a chain. If you can find something that was a misconception, show the kids how reading sometimes helps you "throw out" old ideas. Put those post-its in the misconceptions. (Ex: ALL snowflakes have 6 branches) Write a couple questions in the question section.

Re-do. Read more books, study more pictures

Repeat/ add on/ revise schema/ answer questions/ ask new ones (schema charts are like super-powered KWL's!!)

I do this lesson a little everyday for a week or so and it really makes a point about how our schema is always changing and evolving. After this, kids will be reading and shout, "Hey! My schema changed!"

Later in the year, we have so much fun working in groups to make large schema charts like this. An awesome topic that the kids thought they knew a lot about, was bees. It's a great topic, b/c you can eventually seperate it into many categories: males, females, babies, food, etc... There's lots of books on it, and it's high-interest.

Anyways-- sorry for the book. I love teaching schema!
BookMuncher is offline  
grade4curlyQ's Avatar
grade4curlyQ grade4curlyQ is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 574
Senior Member

grade4curlyQ
 
grade4curlyQ's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 574
Senior Member
Wonderful!
Old 01-19-2007, 05:43 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #20

How wonderful! I will use your idea VERY soon! I'm actually amazed that we both refer to 'files' and 'file cabinets' in the brain too.
Just today (prior to reading your post) I used the 'file cabinet/brain' example with my class and you wouldn't (well, maybe you would!) how many of them appeared to be thinking deeply as they looked at the file cabinet and listened to me 'find my file' out loud. I was modeling explicitly how I had filed away some information in my head and how I was retrieving it in order to apply it to what what I was 'thinking'. Then one of my girls said "Ms. J., how come I never thought about it like that?" "That's exactly what we do when we remember things!" - "I'm going to have to think about reorganizing my filing system!" Which really opens up a dialog about 'thinking' even more in-depth. I was so proud. Yet, I really see your point about schema and couldn't help but reflect on that moment when I read your post. When we go back Monday, I want to explore her comments even further with the whole class. Mini lessons abounding!

Our teacher discussions on schema continued on Thursday, the day after I mentioned them to begin with. While the children were playing, three of us explored the idea even more. I had to know if my after school tutoring group (5th graders) used visualization and how well they could express it, so I did a 2 hour lesson with them. Being that they do not have me as their teacher, and have not been exposed to these strategies, I crunched in 4 weeks of visualization using "Night in the Country" by Cynthia Rylant. I modeled explicitly, then gradually invited them to share their mental images by sketching. This group is from a rural area, as the story is set in the country. I was very shocked at how they struggled to see images in their minds and get them down on paper, let alone describe them to me. They are struggling learners and have been for years. My colleagues and I think they have rarely been challenged to visualize and make connections. The kids are tremendously dependent on the literal words presented in the text and even though they are familiar with nights in the country, they did not bring personal experiences to the words. No background knowledge accessed............it exists surely..........which is really a conundrum in helping us to decide where to start?

Today, for my mini lesson, I used "Leaf Man" by Lois Ehlert. I have been going to the public library each week searching for books. The good thing for the students at my school is, the media center specialist has asked me to share the list of books I find particularly meaningful for specific strategies so that she can purchase them for the school library!

I'd like to share my lesson: I read the book the first time through modeling explicitly. I used the same method mentioned in the book. Close the book on my lap, look up at the ceiling, and describe what the words remind me of. I'll put the books' words in italics and my thoughts in parenthesis.

But yesterday the wind blew Leaf Man away. He left no travel plans. "This reminds me of the times when as a child I had to rake the fallen leaves into a pile. A wind kicked-up, and messed up my pile. It also makes me think of the times I looked up at the sky and the clouds made a peculiar shape. Like that of a dinosaur. (I painted the shape of the animal in the air with my hand.) There is the head, the long body, and the whipping tail. Then, without warning, the wind and other clouds changed the shape of the dinosaur and it became something different, unrecognizable."

The last time I saw him, he was headed east - past the chickens..... " This makes me wonder if clouds also have a journey, what do they see along the way? Do they see me sitting in my patio chair reading a book? Do they see the blue jays swooping down too close to the ground to discourage the cat that ventures close to their nest? What do the leaves see along their journey?"
A Leaf Man's got to go where the wind blows. "This reminds me of when I blow on a dandelion. The seeds have to go in the direction of the force of my breath. They have no choice, unless a stronger force of wind changes their direction."

.....and flew over the turkey, past the potatoes, carrots, and cabbages in rows. "Mmmmmm, I can smell a simmering beef stew with cabbage, carrots, small red potatoes - cut with the skin still on, and turkey......oh the lazy afternoon naps we like to take after eating a juicy turkey!"

....then he blew out of sight......"I guess if I can not see the cloud shapes anymore, just like Leaf Man can not be seen anymore, it doesn't mean that someone.....somewhere isn't seeing a new shape of an animal in the cloud formations or leaf shapes right? (I wonder this out loud) It doesn't mean that the journey is over or the sightseeing is complete."

......past the spotted cows "Is there anything other than a spotted cow? Have I never seen a solid colored cow? I remember the dairy farmer I grew up down the road from........if cows could think, what would his cows have had to say about us romping through their fields to get to the creek for relief from the scorching sun? What else did his cows see?"

....maybe Leaf Man's gliding on a lake breeze..."I remember lying on the edge of our dock this past summer. It was noon time. The hottest part of the day. I can see a green leaf in the water. It was floating past the dock. As it went by, there was a shadow cast to the bottom of the lake almost directly below the leaf. The shadow was taking a journey too. The journey was not entirely with the leaf, but like a duckling trying to keep up with its mother it trailed the leaf. Slowly, but surely....and sometimes disrupted by the waves of a passing boat."

When Leaf Man looks down on earth, is he lonesome for a home? " This part reminds me of the commercials on TV where homeless children need a sponsor so they can have clothing, and many more things that they need."

....only the wind knows.......So listen for the rustle of the leaves. "I can hear the leaves rustling as they are blown by the wind. Almost as if to warn me that a storm may be coming. Just like the leaves of the tree outside my bedroom window. I can even hear the crunch beneath my feet as I walk on the leaves that have found their home."

Then I read the book a second time, yet this time, I shared the pictures with the children. There wasn't a bored looking face in the room! Then, we went through the book a third time, looking at the colors, discussing the artwork, and even the repeating phrase Well, a Leaf Man's got to go where the wind blows. The author changed the font each time this phrase was stated. We wondered together if there was a message in this? We discussed the personification and onomatopoeia (I had mentioned crunch.). The children applauded! They loved the book and wanted so desperately to add their own mental images!

It is more than clear to me that schema has everything to do with being able to articulate so clearly how vivid the images were in my mind. Maybe I'm the one who has been convinced?! I'd like to explore with the children how I had filed those images. But maybe, I should revisit these images after I teach your lesson.
grade4curlyQ is offline  
BookMuncher's Avatar
BookMuncher BookMuncher is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Blog Entries: 9
Senior Member

BookMuncher
 
BookMuncher's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Senior Member
great lesson!
Old 01-20-2007, 05:04 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #21

It sounds like your Leaf Man lesson did exactly as it should have... it was very thorough, and it seems that the kids were getting it!

I'll bet that if you do a week or two of schema, and then go back to mental images, the kids will see even more connections between the two strategies. After schema, and after my introduction to mental images, I do a series of mini-lessons that only deal with how our schema help us to make mental images.

"I have done/seen _____________ before, so that is what is helping me to make this image: ____________________"

Keep up the good work!!!
BookMuncher is offline  
grade4curlyQ's Avatar
grade4curlyQ grade4curlyQ is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 574
Senior Member

grade4curlyQ
 
grade4curlyQ's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 574
Senior Member
Bookmuncher
Old 01-21-2007, 07:05 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #22

I went back and reread the "Homes in the Mind" and "Delving Deeper with Questions" chapters. I could clearly see the schema and asking questions aspects that showed up in my visualization lesson on "The Leaf Man" and thought it might be a good idea to review those chapters. Especially given my recent curiosity about schema and visualization.

Also, in remembering what you has suggested in your post #6, it seems that it be be a good idea to hold on the the book "Leaf Man" and stretch Friday's lesson even further.
Reasons to explore further:
* Having already spent about 4 weeks on connections in the fall, it would probably benefit the children to explicitly explore with chart paper how I was able to make connections and what types of connections they were - Were the connections relevant or not? How were they relevant to deepening the meaning of the text? What types of connections were they? How do we know this for sure?
* Lingering questions.........questions that could be answered during and after reading the book (chart again)
* Synthesis.......... overall theme of the book.........are there other possible themes other than 'forces that guide the leaf (and possibly us humans) on the journey of life may be known, may be unknown, but we do not ultimately know where/what our destination is........it may not be what the author meant.............yet it may be something we can explore as a result of questioning while reading and trying to synthesize the information.

I'd like to prompt the children to help me figure out why I visualized the images that I was remembering "I need your help. I'd like to understand why I was able to see the images I was remembering when I read the book "Leaf Man"". Sort of an explicit modeling of 'thinking about thinking'............is this doable? Is this helpful to the children?

By and far, the 'synthesis' of the information is the most difficult strategy to teach. We won't be ready for this for at least 4-6 weeks. Blooms taxonomy is very evident in this strategy!
grade4curlyQ is offline  
BookMuncher's Avatar
BookMuncher BookMuncher is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Blog Entries: 9
Senior Member

BookMuncher
 
BookMuncher's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Senior Member
thinking about thinking
Old 01-21-2007, 07:15 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #23

I think that exploring why you had the mental images you had, is important and goes back to the idea that everyone's mental images are different b/c our schema is different. In Debbie Miller, she has everyone in the class listen to a poem 3-4 times and draw their mental images. Then, they talk about why everyone's mental images are so different from each other.
BookMuncher is offline  
Miquell's Avatar
Miquell Miquell is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 315
Full Member

Miquell
 
Miquell's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 315
Full Member
Bookmuncher, I am wondering as I am reading:
Old 01-29-2007, 08:42 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #24

It's funny how as I am reading the conversation between everyone on this thread I am learning so much. Bookmuncher in one of your writings you said you don't do centers. I also teach first grade and struggle each time I do reader's ws. Kiddo coming up and asking the same ol' questions "what is this word?, Can I pick a new book?" We have talked about the importance of reading ws and reading groups and it will go along just fine until 10 minutes go by and then someone will get up to interrupt. Help! I was thinking of doing workstations (centers) where they would be doing valuable word study work, read around the room, and computers. Of course they would also do buddy reading and independent reading. Could you share your daily schedule. I feel I am not utilizing my students and my time to the best. I have always enjoyed your insightful input. Thanks so much, Elsa Miquell opps I almost forgot to ask this week we are sending out letters to the families of the students we are considering "holding over" I always hate to be put in this postition because there is so much that can change between Jan. and May. So much development happens in First Grade. My question is what do you base your opinion on when considering if a child is still not making the grade that you would consider holding them over? Any ideas would help
Miquell is offline  
grade4curlyQ's Avatar
grade4curlyQ grade4curlyQ is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 574
Senior Member

grade4curlyQ
 
grade4curlyQ's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 574
Senior Member
Thanks
Old 01-30-2007, 06:40 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #25

Thanks again bookmuncher for the conversation and collaboration. It's been very insightful and inspiring.
I tried using your wonderful rubric (that I had adapted) and found that I was making a lot of notes in the margins, so it wasn't quite fitting my needs after all. I wasn't allowing for specific strengths and weaknesses to be indicated. After perusing the Mosaic List serve, I located a few rubrics and conference logs that might be more along the lines of what I was needing to begin with. They are attached.

Strategies That Work still has not arrived. The third party company that Amazon uses for some book order purchases wouldn't even reply to my inquiries. When I contacted Amazon through the A-Z Warranty, their response was immediate. The third party company responded to Amazon that they refunded my initial purchase amount and paid for a new book to be shipped to me. Still waiting. (Sigh)
Attached Files
File Type: doc Reader Workshop Conference.doc (28.0 KB, 83 views)
File Type: doc Grades 4 and 5 RW Comprehension Rubric.doc (29.0 KB, 66 views)
grade4curlyQ is offline  
BookMuncher's Avatar
BookMuncher BookMuncher is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Blog Entries: 9
Senior Member

BookMuncher
 
BookMuncher's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Senior Member
Miquell
Old 01-30-2007, 05:58 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #26

Hi Miquell! Sorry to hear you're having some issues with workshop... have you tried making a chart together and spending a period of mini-lessons (probably about a week) on how you can help yourself as a reader? My kids have tool box of things they can do, including saving the book for partner time if they are feeling that it's too hard.

How many books do they have at once? I find that they need about 10 to sustain themselves if they are about an A-C reader. Middle readers can have about 5-7. I have a time at the end of the day each day where they decide if they need to trade in a couple of books. They are never allowed to get books when it's workshop time, so it only takes one day of being "bored" with their selection to remind themselves to shop during that time.

My schedule is:

8:45-9 arrival/ FYOE reading
9-9:15 Greeting and Morning Message
9:15- 9:30 Short shared read followed by shared write
9:30-9:40 RW Mini lesson
9:40-10:05ish Private reading/conferences
10:05ish-10:15 Partner reading/ guided reading group
10:15-10-25 Share
10:25-10:40 Word Work
recess/snack/ novel read aloud
11:10- Writing mini lesson
11:20-11:50 Writer's Workshop

I don't think there is anything wrong with doing workstations-- especially if your kids aren't able to sustain their reading. Maybe workstations would work better for you.

PS: I can't really answer your question about retention, b/c in our school we don't believe in holding kids back... but that's a WHOLE different post!!
BookMuncher is offline  
BookMuncher's Avatar
BookMuncher BookMuncher is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Blog Entries: 9
Senior Member

BookMuncher
 
BookMuncher's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Senior Member
grade4curlyQ
Old 01-30-2007, 06:01 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #27

I'm glad you've found something that works for you ... I could see why that rubric wouldn't help-- I use that for grades PER marking period. So it's like a reflection that I do three times a year. But you're right- between that, I need to take lots of anecdotal records.

Something I just learned that I LOVE: Instead of writing notes to yourself on what the kid needs to work on and then keeping it in your records, write it in a notebook or record sheet that the CHILD keeps track of. This way, everyday before workshop, they are responsible for reminding themselves what you last talked about and then doing it. I am really liking that- now, when I need my notes I know where to find them, but they are really getting used.

Good luck getting that book!
BookMuncher is offline  
grade4curlyQ's Avatar
grade4curlyQ grade4curlyQ is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 574
Senior Member

grade4curlyQ
 
grade4curlyQ's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 574
Senior Member
Like That
Old 01-31-2007, 04:14 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #28

Hi Bookmuncher!

What a great suggestion. Good timing too. I had been writing their goals after each conference in both my binder and their sticky notes.
I see where some teachers use a clip board and find that more useful.
Do you use a clip board or binder or something else?

Good news! The book came yesterday afternoon. I'm well into CHP 2. DBabb had suggested that I read Strategies after Mosaic and it was a wonderful idea! I can see how the first lends itself incredibly well to the Strategies book.
Funny thing, one of the first things I noticed as I began reading it was the suggestion to be a reflective reader myself - questioning where connections and visualizations come from. I thought, hmmmm didn't I ask bookmuncher about this very same idea and went back and looked and there on the 1/21/07 post was the question!

Though it's all coming together, it still remains somewhat bothersome to think I have so far to go. WW, Reggie, Lucy Calkins, Debbie Miller, and so many more. However, I have begun and will continue to forge on.

Oh, and I have just one young man who says he can not visualize. Guess I'll try some basic things like what he's used to seeing at home or at school to get him started.

Yesterday's book share was "The Two of Them" by Aliki. I tried something new. I gave a brief explanation of the book and the author and told the students that I would not be showing them the pictures in the book today. (a few moans) Instead, I would be reading the book several times and then we would do a creative activity. (got their attention) I did allow for a few students to describe what they were visualizing along the way. It helps those who need to hear what others think. After two readings of the book, I passed out construction paper divided into fourths (passed through the computer). I asked the students to draw their mental images and any words that triggered the images could be written in the box. Short activity, but they were very focused. Today they suggested that I put all of the images on the wall above the bulletin board so everyone could view them (I acted like I had nowhere to display all of them). Since they didn't get to see one another's work yesterday, they were really eager to view the images today. Amazing conversations erupted!!!!!! They asked one another "Why did you see that?" and "What kind of connection did you make?" and even mused over the variety of ways that everyone interpreted the words, characters, and book. I even heard "You and I think alike....see in the picture where you drew the flute......it looks a lot like my sketch."
I asked them if they would like me to read the book once more and show them the pictures this time? They were anxious. Wonder why? It was impressive to see them so involved and discussing how similar or different their images were to the ones in the book. I thought it went well. Each time I read more, I realize other ways I could have made the lesson more significant for them though. A feeling of "yea"..........followed shortly by "Oh, why didn't I think to do this or that?"
grade4curlyQ is offline  
heather818 heather818 is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 207
Full Member

heather818
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 207
Full Member
For bookmuncher- workshop signal
Old 01-31-2007, 05:50 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #29

Hi bookmuncher,

I am working on re-vamping my schedule some for the rest of this year. How do you signal your children to move from indep. reading to partner reading? I find this time either a)hectic or b)stopping to hear me talk too much. I would like a smooth signal between the two so the kids transition more independently. I have had good luck with songs in the past, and I'm considering using a signal song that allows them time to finish up reading, choose book for home that night, and move to sit with partner. My kids read at their table seats and move to a place they choose (usually floor) for partner time.
heather818 is offline  
BookMuncher's Avatar
BookMuncher BookMuncher is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Blog Entries: 9
Senior Member

BookMuncher
 
BookMuncher's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Senior Member
heather
Old 02-01-2007, 03:16 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #30

I have to admit that I have an "easy" class this year, so what works for me, might not work for you or for me next year . My kids sit in assigned book nooks around the room. Each book nook is actually two nooks close by each other, so that they can ask their partner for assistance if needed.

My private reading time is very quiet, so when it's partner time, I just stay with the group I am with and say, "Readers, you may partner read."

Not much of a signal, but for this group, it's all they need.

When partner time is over, they put their bookshelves on their desks and come to the sharing circle holding anything they want to share. Then they go back and hold up the book they want to take home and we transition to the next thing.
BookMuncher is offline  
heather818 heather818 is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 207
Full Member

heather818
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 207
Full Member
Bookmuncher
Old 02-01-2007, 04:23 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #31

I am still waiting for my "easy" class. :-) I have an interesting combo. of kids- on-task but loud, loudly off-task for various and complicated reasons, loudly off-task for obvious and fixable reasons, and begging for total silence!

Everything you read talks about introducing signals for lowering voices and using them consistently while you're setting expectations. I have been consistent with what's acceptable and how I let them know what's not. I think this may just be "one of those chatty groups."

However, during a surprise principal observation today, they were fabulous! This tells me that they CAN turn it on when they want to!

If I'm totally honest with myself, I know that while I've stayed consistent with the signal, many things have changed throughout the year as I've learned and grown into Kindergarten expectations. I've really toyed this year with some literacy stations vs. all independent reading. I find that they get the most out of independent reading, I teach more in conferences than in GR, but I am reluctant to let go of some stations (poetry, big books, listening, etc.) to have as an option when I need un-interrupted, long blocks of teaching time. I find that I can keep them on-task for meaningful things for short times, but when I need to assess a lot (DRA's due, GKAP, etc.) I have to choose between short and meaningful or long and slightly busy-work-ish. This makes it hard to assess without being guilty that the kids are doing worthless stuff! In my fervent desire for all kids to be on-task at all times, and to answer questions and be accessible to them as I move around the room during some assignments, I also think that I have failed to make them independent enough to sustain work so I can teach a group or individual! (Either that or I'm just so charming they can't stop talking to me! :-) Ha, ha.)

For these reasons, I sort of miss centers. However, I feel like the effort (mine and theirs) that goes into maintiaing and understading them (huge) is not worth the pay-off (not so huge, in my experience). Since reading Daily Five and On Solid Ground, I've thought that maybe the best answer for me was a combination that went something like this:

Mini-lesson
Indep. reading
Partner reading
Visit to ONE practice station

My issues with this were: when only one station is an option, I can't accomodate for very short attention spans. It is also hard to dedicate the teaching time to enough varieties of expectations/ choices of jobs at the work stations so that there was an entry point for every child. Biggest issue (and reason for my previous question to you)- logistics. How to elegantly signal these changes, get kids to me quickly for guided reading PRN, transition between activities, etc. I always feel that in an effort to clearly explain things, I end up talking too much.

I think my problem is trying to do a little bit of everything. Like Miller says, teach a little well. I think I lack the confidence to abandon things completely. I feel like if I can just combine enough reserach and enough strategies, something will reach everyone. With no clear expectations from admin. and no imput from colleagues, it is so hard to decide what is MOST important.

I am eager for the summer to let my thoughts settle in my head and begin again with a better plan!

Whew, what a rant! I'm almost embarrassed to post after taking time to type it! If you're still reading by any chance, back to my original point- your transitions sound simple and elegant. Great job! :-)
heather818 is offline  
BookMuncher's Avatar
BookMuncher BookMuncher is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Blog Entries: 9
Senior Member

BookMuncher
 
BookMuncher's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Senior Member
heather
Old 02-01-2007, 04:58 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #32

I totally understand what you're saying about centers... especially in kindergarten I think that there are some good things for them to hit and also I could see how they could work longer at them. Would you run your one practice station so that the kids choose where to go or that they rotate each day? Could you trust them enough to choose a reading activity? I realize that my kids are older, but they can do "FYOE" reading for 45 minutes if I really needed them to. That's because during that time, they have lots of reading choices. Big books, read around the room, poetry, etc... That might not be structured enough for your guys, though.

Something that I do that could help with transitions-- but again, I really don't know about kindergarten-- is that I have a Reader's Workshop Board. It takes up about 4.5 feet by 3 feet on my white board. It has a lot of info. that we refer to, and therefore, don't ever have to speak. It tells the kids what they can be working on at independent reading-- whatever our focus strategy is. It tells what kids I'm conferencing with, where everyone's book nooks are, and has a place where the kids can sign up for sharing (I only allow the kids who I conference with to sign up for a definate sharing slot- if there's time, others who have something can share). The board is not a transitional tool, but it serves a focuser and it does make things run smoothly.

Also, knowing what's MOST important is soooo hard! I juggle that all of the time. Besides just knowing WHAT is important, I also find that sometimes--just sometimes-- I need to spice things up a bit. The RW and WW are based on the fact that the kids do them everyday without fail and are grounded by their reliability. However, as much as I LOVE them, there have been times where I've felt that just a little of my teaching spark has dimmed. I need extra built in times every once in a while for groups to get together and act out a favorite part from a book or to make a book advertisement or to write a play. I still need to do those things that kids remember. Even on these days, I still try to never ever cut out either workshop, but it becomes a very tedious balancing act.
BookMuncher is offline  
1stgradenew 1stgradenew is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 754
Senior Member

1stgradenew
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 754
Senior Member
Book Nooks
Old 02-01-2007, 05:10 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #33

Bookmuncher when ever I read you posts I think of something I could be doing better or about something I never really thought of before. So after this post my question for you is:
How do you assign your book nooks? I like that idea b/c I think it will make things smoother. Do you rotate booknook locations? or do they have one forever. How close are your buddies? how nookieish (is that a word? haha) are your nooks? Do you just have pillows around the room or much more than that?

Sometimes I can't wait for the summer b/c I have so many things I want to change already, then I think I should just do it now...but I don't know. Like moving my library...is that too much for the middle of the year? hmm. After I see your picture I may decide to do it.

Another quick question. I read how you give the kids notebooks where you write your notes to them. That was in solid ground right? I was thinking about trying that but wasn't sure? You are liking it? Do you have them write back to you in the journal...or is it only your notes? How much do you give them in there...just one try this: ? I actually have about 20 spiral notebooks and 20 steno notebooks with no use...might as well use them huh? When you conference do you always try to touch on what you talked about last time? Conferencing is my WEAK point

Gosh Bookmuncher I am so sorry for all these questions. This is the hardest part of being a 1st year teacher with no one at my school doing what I do. No one to say, "hey how do you handle this" I thank god for Proteacher and for everyone (especially you) who help me. Please let me know when you have had enough

Last edited by 1stgradenew; 02-01-2007 at 05:29 PM..
1stgradenew is offline  
heather818 heather818 is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 207
Full Member

heather818
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 207
Full Member

Old 02-01-2007, 06:31 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #34

I agree about needing variety every now and then. I try to bring in memorable, fun activities that coordinate with our holiday, theme or sciecne/ soc. stud. topic. I am not very good at making time for doing those things daily. I have had good work with using time on some Fridays differently. We often change our schedule and have several activities based on a unit or special event. I have used activities related to my author study for many of these "Fantastic Fridays" and had good success with this strategy. I don't think the reliability of workshop suffers with an occasional break from routine. :-)

On the centers note, I have never had much success with rotating centers. Literacy centers were HUGE in my previous district, and I spent a lot of time on them. (I was always trying to do a workshop AND centers. I was afraid to skip guided reading for a while, even when I saw the majority of growth from conferences.) In 1st grade I used a "Reading Ticket" which listed the stations for each day of the week. I liked that I could plan out the whole week's activities for a group of kids in advance and I used them often to differentiate efficiently between different levels of tasks or assignments. The children carried the tickets in a folder, marked their progress, and used them to reflect on learning at the end of the workshop. In K, my kids are more scattered moving around the stations, so I've used a work board instead of tickets. It is harder to differentiate and has to be arranged daily. In both formats my kids had a list of stations and could choose the order in which to visit them. They also chose activities once they arrived. The "I can..." list grew as the year progressed and provided several options at each center.

My children manage themselves more effectively when they have selected the activity, so I agree with you there. However, I have some choices that are more popular than others and that is why I've had to always give some sort of structure for them to choose within.

Do your kids choose their book nooks? How long do they stay in those spots? I love the idea of the workshop focus board. I've been considering clearing off part of my calendar for a "News You Can Use" board with similar items.
heather818 is offline  
heather818 heather818 is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 207
Full Member

heather818
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 207
Full Member
I agree
Old 02-01-2007, 06:33 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #35

with you, first grade new, about the dilemma between starting now and waiting for next year! I don't want to short-change these kids, but I also don't want to confuse them.

After reading Daily Five, I really want to back up and re-model some of the components of our reading workshop. I have wondered if spending that time now would be the best use, or if I should continue working within our exisiting structures.
heather818 is offline  
1stgradenew 1stgradenew is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 754
Senior Member

1stgradenew
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 754
Senior Member
heather
Old 02-01-2007, 07:08 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #36

I know that is just how I feel too...I want to do the best for them, so I think if changing would help then I should...but then I think will a week be wasted bc they will be re-adjusting to everything? hmmm...

The big reason I want to move my library is b/c I have it smoshed into a small place and when my kids are shopping for their books I feel like I am always saying...if you spend your time staring at the shelves you will never find a book...get in there and look, and now I feel it might be my fault. Maybe my library just isn't big enough for 5 kids at once to not be on top of each other. Maybe they are using their manners and waiting for room...haha!

Daily Five is one that I haven't read, I think the only one. Would you suggest it? what good points have you gotten from it that you haven't from others? Thanks

Last edited by 1stgradenew; 02-02-2007 at 04:38 AM..
1stgradenew is offline  
BookMuncher's Avatar
BookMuncher BookMuncher is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Blog Entries: 9
Senior Member

BookMuncher
 
BookMuncher's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Senior Member
tour of library
Old 02-02-2007, 05:46 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #37

I just posted a not-so-carefully done video tour of my library on my blog. I did it quickly- the kids are coming in right now. I hope that it helps you think of a way to organize your space for your library.

I'll post more on your other comments later! Have a great day!
BookMuncher is offline  
Miquell's Avatar
Miquell Miquell is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 315
Full Member

Miquell
 
Miquell's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 315
Full Member
Bookmuncher!!
Old 02-03-2007, 06:34 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #38

Thank you so much once again you have got me thinking. The most books they have are 5! with the higher readers (chapter books) having about 2-3 books. It makes total sense that they would get bored by Tuesday. My kids are not allowed to go into the library during RW to get new books. It sounds like we do things differently so I am interested in what you do. In my school, and I thought this was part of Reader's WS,My students have "Book Baggies" I know some people so it where the child each have a box of books but honestly I just don't have the spaceMy room is small about 5' than the average room in our school but I love the location and the overall homey feeling it has.) These B Baggies contain 5 books that they select from the leveled book section in our classroom library. These books are read during R/W reading time and are the same books they take home during the week each night to read. Once a week they go down to our "School Library" and select 1 book either a reader on their level or one that can be read with assistance or just read to by their parents.What do you do? Do your students have book baggies? I like the way your schedule looks and has got me rethinking my schedule. I tend to go over on time and I have made myself aware of this by actually setting a timer to keep myself and the class on schedule. I truely believe that in order for kids to be great readers they need to READ! At the beginning of the new year I love to introduce new changes to the class I tell them they are able to handle more responsiblity and then go into new things. I love "On Solid Ground" and introduced the concept of writing in small composition booklets. They love it! Whenever I conference with them they bring me their REader Folders (I have red for reader WS like OSG)I love how they read the comments I have written and focus on that as they read! And I never even told them to do that!!They also share with each other and see similarities. On Thursday I heard one child say to another"Oh I can help you with finding word chunks because I do that really good, its written in my conference notes"! How cool is that? What is FYOE reading? I have several days when I have the whole morning upinterruped so I will some rearranging with my time and how I use it. What Math series do you use?When do you check Home work?Thanks so much for all your insightful help and time. Like others on this board,I have no one who really does Readers WS, some only do it when they are going to be observed (thats another book!).So being able to talk about all of this with you and others is a really great thing for me. Thanks Sorry for the "BOOK", Elsa Miquell
Miquell is offline  
Miquell's Avatar
Miquell Miquell is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 315
Full Member

Miquell
 
Miquell's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 315
Full Member
Opps
Old 02-03-2007, 06:38 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #39

I forgot could you post a picture of your Work Board? I would love to see it. I have spent the last few days staying after school to sort and throw out things. I rearranged my room the kids love it. Thanks Emiquell
Miquell is offline  
grade4curlyQ's Avatar
grade4curlyQ grade4curlyQ is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 574
Senior Member

grade4curlyQ
 
grade4curlyQ's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 574
Senior Member
RW & Library
Old 02-03-2007, 07:11 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #40

Miquell has made me wonder if I should NOT allow the children to use the classroom library as I conference or as RW is occurring?
I know I have a lot of reading to do as I'm only just now reading STW and recently completed Mosiac - and answers to some of these questions may be suggested as I complete these books that I've purchased. You're probably thinking "Keep reading. You'll see."

I would love it if a few of you would explain how you manage your library and book privileges.
1. How many books do you allow the children to borrow at a time? My library is in its incubation period at approx. 400 books. I've recently discovered that I have a scant number of science fiction books. I'm banking my Scholastic points to purchase a collection of this genre, Newberry winners, favorite authors, and biographies. Picture Books too! Two of my students created a database similar to Beth Newingham's, yet with more categories and when we generated a pie chart of the genres we discovered this gap in available selections. (PS, university judges came Thursday to view their database for a tech competition and it looks like they are advancing on to the state competition based on the judges comments! We didn't see this coming!)
2. How often do you allow visits to the library? (Including abandoning a book.)
Thanks so very much!
PS Congratulations Bookmuncher on winning the Door Prize! So WONDERFUL!
grade4curlyQ is offline  
BookMuncher's Avatar
BookMuncher BookMuncher is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Blog Entries: 9
Senior Member

BookMuncher
 
BookMuncher's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Senior Member
1stgradenew
Old 02-03-2007, 07:45 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #41

Sorry about the movie... I just can't figure it out. I'll post pictures instead.

I have 18 kids and 9 book nooks. An example of a book nook is "The Door", but the kids know that one nook is in the corner by the door and the other is on a little blue carpet with cushions that's about 3 feet from the door. Not all the "nooks" are "nookish" . Most nooks have either a carpet or pillows, and if they don't, the kids are allowed to get a carpet square and bring it to that spot. In many cases, like the one above, one of the spots is cozy, but b/c I didn't want both kids really close, I put one by the door. Kids keep their book nooks for two or four days at a time. This way, they trade off and both kids get to sit in the more desirable one.

I have a small poster with each book nook around it and each partnership has a number magnet that rotates.

Kids are resilient-- I think if you need to move the library to improve instruction and maximize your time, do it. (This is a pretty spontaneous person speaking, though)

There are two different kids of letters/notes we do: Every child has a folder. In the folder is a notebook for "talk backs" and also a paper for our conference notes. I just started the notebooks, b/c I wanted them to be able to write pretty fluently before starting it. They write me a letter every Wed., talking back to a book they have been working on. I write back to them, sometimes asking them to expand.

Then, they also have a paper in their folders where I write our conference notes and they are supposed to read them back b4 starting their reading each day. I only ever write ONE teaching point and sometimes I write down a compliment too.

Hope that helps! Let me know if you have more questions!!
BookMuncher is offline  
BookMuncher's Avatar
BookMuncher BookMuncher is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Blog Entries: 9
Senior Member

BookMuncher
 
BookMuncher's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Senior Member
Miquell
Old 02-03-2007, 07:51 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #42

My kids have book boxes which we call book shelves. They fit into the square cubbies we have. (They are those cardboard magazine holders) My kids do pick from leveled baskets, but mostly their choices come from the songs, ABC, authors, old read alouds, nonfiction, etc... THe pattern I've found is that kids usually read above their "level", but if they have schema for the genre, they can do it. So another reason why my kids are probably not bored is because they are reading books that they love to read again and again.

Your conferencing sounds like it's going great! Doesn't it seem so much more meaningful that way?

Our district just bought Scotts Foresman/Investigations. I REALLY REALLY miss my Everyday math.

I check homework on sundays- it's all due on Friday. This is the first year I've done it like this, and I love it. I used to always rush during my specials, and now I've freed up so much planning time. How do you do it?

I have to take a picture of the Reader's Workshop board... I'll do that on Monday! (If I forget, please remind me! )
BookMuncher is offline  
BookMuncher's Avatar
BookMuncher BookMuncher is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Blog Entries: 9
Senior Member

BookMuncher
 
BookMuncher's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Senior Member
grade4curlyQ
Old 02-03-2007, 07:55 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #43

I don't know how similiar book choice is in first and fourth... I don't let my kids choose during workshop, because their books are so short that they would finish one and browse their whole reading time. I build in time for shopping everyday (they only go when the need to) at the very end of the day during our free reading time.

My kids have about 3-10 books at a time. Emergent readers need 10 b/c they are about 6 pages long. My higher readers have one or maybe two chapter books and a picture book and a nonfiction. This isn't prescibed by me, but we talk abouta good diet-- having both fiction and non-fiction and books that are mostly just right. For fourth grade, I'm sure it would be different. I would think they would only have one novel and then 3 others-- some picture books and nonfiction. Nonfiction is really important to have at all times b/c kids don't get enough practice reading it, and picture books are an escape.
BookMuncher is offline  
grade4curlyQ's Avatar
grade4curlyQ grade4curlyQ is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 574
Senior Member

grade4curlyQ
 
grade4curlyQ's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 574
Senior Member
Balanced Diet
Old 02-03-2007, 08:11 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #44

This term is going to prove very helpful! Wonderful.
I realized after my earlier post that the students also have the following available to them (these are not located in the classroom library, yet are located around the room in various places): Weekly reader for Science & SS (laminated and hanging on rings), National Geographic for Kids, TIME for Kids, Scholastic News, Nick, Ranger Rick.....
I'm thinking maybe if I suggest to the kids that they should have 3 non-fiction, 1 chapter book, and 1-2 picture or AR books at any given time it might be 4th grade appropriate? Balanced diet?

I have a very, very small classroom that will accommodate only 3-4 children in the library at a time. I may have to work in visitation during the 7:15-7:50 time period in the morning. Make a schedule and post it with student names in specific time slots daily. I'll get to work on developing this. (It may sound too structured, however, with such a small room and so many 4th graders, structure seems to be what works well.)

Thanks so very much.
grade4curlyQ is offline  
1stgradenew 1stgradenew is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 754
Senior Member

1stgradenew
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 754
Senior Member
Thank you
Old 02-03-2007, 12:11 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #45

for the trying the movie...too bad it didn't work, but pictures will be great! I actually started rearranging my room on Friday when my kids were watching a movie in another classroom...i already like it much better and so do the kids. I think I might start having the kids hold on to their conference notes in a notebook, b/c I don't feel that I utilize the notes I keep enough, but I think they could really benefit. I also think I am going to be assigning book nooks too, b/c too many of kids sit on top of each other in one tiny space.
What about those kids who like to read at their desks? I have a few that always pick that...do you allow them their desk if they don't like their nook? I'm thinking I might just use a pocket chart system.

I look forward to the pictures I would love to see your RW focus board as well Because now that I moved my library I have a decent sized BB in my library

Last edited by 1stgradenew; 02-03-2007 at 12:28 PM..
1stgradenew is offline  
Jeanne b's Avatar
Jeanne b Jeanne b is offline
 
Joined: Dec 2005
Posts: 311
Full Member

Jeanne b
 
Jeanne b's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2005
Posts: 311
Full Member
Bookmuncher
Old 02-03-2007, 02:34 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #46

Sorry the movie didn't work. I kept thinking I was losing my computer "clicking" skills. The pictures will be wonderful too!

The notebooks sound like a great idea. Last year I had a Dear Teacher journal where the kids wrote to me and I wrote back (once a week). This year I've gone back to the Dear Parent book. But the conference notebook sounds like a way to communicate (using the reading AND writing skills) and also do a reader response. I think this will also help my higher level kids.
I'm curious by what you mean by notebook. Do you mean spiral notebook or do you just put paper inside the folder? I may start that since the kids are getting so into our reading strategies. Thanks for the blog--we've gotten into inferring last week. It's amazing how books can coorelate from one character to another (T to T).
Jeanne b is offline  
BookMuncher's Avatar
BookMuncher BookMuncher is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Blog Entries: 9
Senior Member

BookMuncher
 
BookMuncher's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Senior Member
updated
Old 02-04-2007, 06:36 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #47

OK-- my blog is updated with just three pictures... sorr that the movie didn't work!!!
BookMuncher is offline  
BookMuncher's Avatar
BookMuncher BookMuncher is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Blog Entries: 9
Senior Member

BookMuncher
 
BookMuncher's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Senior Member
Jeanne
Old 02-04-2007, 06:37 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #48

I use a first grade "notebook" with half a page first grade lines and the other half place for a picutre.
BookMuncher is offline  
Miquell's Avatar
Miquell Miquell is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 315
Full Member

Miquell
 
Miquell's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2005
Posts: 315
Full Member
Bookmuncher
Old 02-04-2007, 05:55 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #49

Yes, I am happy about my conferences. This is our 2nd year with Everyday M and I am getting the hang of it. We had Scotts F and it never seemed to be enough. Everyday is tough on a lot of kids. I feel they assume the students have a good grip on math and my just never seem to come in from K with many skills. How much homework do you give a night? You must have some type of weekly schedule of homework or something like that. I usually have them read for 20 minutes, then spelling work/phonics, Everyday 1-2 pages, and a handwriting practice sheet or writing piece. I check my homework everymorning as they are putting their things away and getting ready for the morning. I feel it takes too much time but I too use to check it during my prep periods and somehow it would start to build up and I was then whinning to my husband that I was getting behind . I am interested in what you do. My kids copy their HW from the board. In the beginning I type it up but by the 2nd month of school they are copying some off the board. I feel it is a skill they need to know. It's so amazing how great they get at doing it.I am going to your blog now to check out your pics, I was disappointed I could get you video going , I am working on a week of Schema for RW. I read what you did and it is just the thing my kids need. Does it take you a long time to do your lesson plans? I usually do M-Th and leave Fridays for anything I need to reemphasize or to catch up on a lesson that I might have missed or did not finish due to the million and 1 interruptions that occur at any given day. Thanks for all your insightful help you are really a great help!!Miquell.
Miquell is offline  
BookMuncher's Avatar
BookMuncher BookMuncher is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Blog Entries: 9
Senior Member

BookMuncher
 
BookMuncher's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,202
Senior Member
Miquell
Old 02-04-2007, 06:06 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #50

Hi Miquell!

I have a homework menu that, every week, has the exact same choices:

Brainstorm 8 words with our word pattern
Read the house for 8 words with our word pattern
SEntence Dictation (parents read aloud, child writes)
Sight word game (this game changes weekly)
Math page
Math page
Math Online facts game
Reading Response Question

Every night, the PARENTS- not kids, are to choose one choice for their child to do. It should take 10 minutes. So, for my on-level and below level first graders, they usually choose 1 or two nights of word pattern, a night of sight word game, a night of math. My high kids usually do 2 nights of math and 2 nights of reading response.

Everyone reads 10-15 minutes of their book from reader's workshop.

There is a homework log where the parents X off what their child did each night (a lot of families do 2 or 3 choices every night by choice). On Friday, the child brings the log, their notebook and any math pages if they chose that. I can check everything in about 30 minutes.

My kids spend no time in school going over, checking, or preparing for homework.

This works for me!
BookMuncher is offline  
grade4curlyQ's Avatar
grade4curlyQ grade4curlyQ is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 574
Senior Member

grade4curlyQ
 
grade4curlyQ's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 574
Senior Member
Miccol71
Old 02-05-2007, 05:29 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #51

I was reviewing bookmunchers suggestion for a mini-lesson on schema and realized that I did not reply to your question! Sorry. I was clearly engrossed in MOT!

I heard about "The Daily 5" and have not read it yet. In fact, it is on my list of 'must reads'.

To be honest, I found MOT easier to read and connect with then STW. Thought I have put forth more effort in STW to leave tracks of my thoughts and ideas. BULGING with sticky notes!
My conscious effort to make it count.

I've heard of so many books that I should have already read prior to this 6th year of teaching that I can't believe how far I have to go!
grade4curlyQ is offline  
heather818 heather818 is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 207
Full Member

heather818
 
Joined: Oct 2006
Posts: 207
Full Member
Daily Five
Old 02-08-2007, 06:35 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #52

Hi, and sorry for the late reply. This week has been insane! Our administration has shown a sudden burst of enthusiasm for RW/ WW and meetings and obsevations have taken up a lot of time this week. It is very exciting, but also stressful. I have visitors almost every day now, and I don't want anyone to be turned off of the method because of my poor execution of it!

As for the Daily Five, it is very good at explaining how to clearly model and set up 5 components of an independent literacy program. (If I'm remembering correctly, they are: read to self, work on writing, read to someone/ listenting, a working with words type station, and something that I'm forgetting right now.) They start with read to self, and the launch of that was useful for me to read about. I liked the way that the children had a choice of which of the 5 components to work on during the various work periods of the 2.5 hour block. I didn't like that the writing component was mixed in with the reading. (I'm using Units of Study, and I don't see any way that could work as well if I had my kids writing at different times of the morning.)

It is a quick read with some ideas that are different from others I (we) have read. However, it is not my all-time favorite. It was useful to me as I worked to structure my components in my mind and find a balance between some stations, no stations, all reading, partners, etc. After much of my reading, I felt like work stations didn't have a place. This book served as a good tool to help me organize my thoughts about this. I used parts of their structure to include some "stations." (Poetry, big books, listening, etc.) I chose to keep time for these centers because they were the best way I could find to allow the kids time to read things other than their independent book bags. I am still working on a way to lead a workshop like Miller's in which the kids are reading poem charts, big books, independent books, etc. at the same time. Using this book helped me find a more structured middle ground.
heather818 is offline  

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

 

 

>
Sunflower Room
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 10:45 PM.


Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net