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firstisfun firstisfun is offline
 
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Book suggestions for HIGH 1st graders
Old 11-02-2010, 04:09 PM
 
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I have a couple of very high readers in my first grade class this year. They both fluently read anything I've given them. They have very strong literal comprehension, but don't necessarily get the big ideas of books that are at their level. They haven't been exposed to any comprehension strategies, and with the class I have, I just can't teach them those outside of the whole group.

Any suggestions for titles I could look for? They love Junie B., but that isn't a challenge for them. They love all the rainbow fairy type books, but again, I don't think they are learning anything. Those are the only chapter books I've been able to get them to read. They prefer picture books, really. Suggestions???


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Old 11-02-2010, 04:16 PM
 
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Henry and Mudge and Mr. Putter and Tabby books by Cynthia Rylant

She also writes a series High Rise Private Eyes

Magic Tree House books by Mary Pope Osborne

Ramona Quimby books by Beverly Cleary

I have two boys at home so we did not read Babysitter Club books

A to Z Mysteries by Ron Roy


I have about three students who are fluent readers. They are allowed to take Junie B books out of the library. all the rest want to take out Junie B. I have them get me a book and read to me in the library. If they can read one page without 5 errors they can take out the book.
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Thanks for the suggestions
Old 11-03-2010, 06:30 AM
 
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Henry & Mudge as well as Mr. Putter & Tabby are about 2 years too easy for these kiddos. I wish they would be interested in any kind of mysteries. Maybe later.

But Ramona might be just exactly right. They'll have enough schema to understand and she is entertaining enough to engage them. Thank you!
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Old 11-04-2010, 10:30 AM
 
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With my high readers (first grade) we are reading nonfiction. I explain to them that their new challenge is to use reading to learn about lots of things. So even though they know all the words, now they are working on vocabulary and learning how to use the features of content area books. My high readers are very very capable of reading chapter books, but even so, we are reading level J Twig books from Wright Group. They get great exposure to lots of really interesting things.
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Old 11-04-2010, 12:51 PM
 
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If your students are girls, the Clementine books by Marla Frazee are hits. Also The Magic Treehouse books are awesome and can lead into some extended research projects.


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Old 11-04-2010, 01:01 PM
 
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Grandma's Attic series is one my 9 yodd (low to average reader) enjoys.

There are Little House books which are fun to read. Girls like them and boys like the Farmer Boy book in the series. Similarly, Dear America is good.

Landmark biographies are within reach of high firsts.

Don't forget clean joke books and such. Believe it or not, they WILL get new vocabulary from them.

A student might read in a corny joke book:

Teacher: Use the word "analyze" and "anatomy" in a sentence.
Kid: My analyze over the ocean. My analyze over the sea. Bring back my ana-tomy!

He won't "get it" but then he asks you or parent and learns what analyze and anatomy means. And then he learns that there is a "My Bonnie lies over the Ocean" song. A little culture, a little vocabulary. And a groaner of a joke.

Maybe he'll read:

Teacher: Johnny, give three example of collective nouns.
Johnny: A trash can, a penny jar, and a stamp book.

Again, he doesn't get it but the adult explains what a collective noun is (and maybe what a noun is) and then gives good examples (group, herd, etc.) and explains why the joke is (mildly) funny.

Older joke books are better than the new ones because they assume that kids have a certain historical and grammatical background... In other words, the books expect a kid to know what analyze is, what nouns are, the song My Bonnie...

On the lines of parts of speech, the Ruth Heller paperbacks are extremely beautifully written and while they are picture books, they have wonderful illustrations, great examples of rhyme, and they teach concepts that firsties can grab. Chickens aren't the Only Ones is about eggs while most of her other books are about parts of speech. Wow! The books LOOK childish on first impression but they are very mature and wonderful.

Just some ideas...
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