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Beginning of the Year Mini Lessons
Old 06-17-2006, 05:57 AM
 
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Hello Everyone! I thought maybe we should start a thread with possible beginning of the year mini lessons. I know you should adapt these to meet the needs of your class, but with all of our ideas together we should start the year off right. What do you think? I will post mine after I get my list finished. Happy Reading!

Lana/SC


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bike analogy
Old 06-17-2006, 03:43 PM
 
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At the beginning of the year, we talk a lot about riding a bike and how it is like reading. The kids seem to be able to draw this analogy themselves, so it's meaningful to them. Some of the things we say are:

When you are learning to ride, it's smartest to ride on a flat road. Riding uphill is too hard when you are just learning. You can hardly pedal, you have to keep stopping, it won't be any fun, and you probably won't get to the top. Worst of all, you'll never learn how to ride if you just keep riding uphill! (Just as reading uphill books doesn't give you the right kind of practice. You won't understand it, and you won't have fun!) Riding down hill can be fun, but that doesn't give your legs exercise and doesn't require that you use some bike riding strategies- like turning, pedaling, stopping. (Just as reading downhill books CAN be fun for sometimes, but doesn't exercise your learning to read muscles or give you a chance to use your strategies).

We work on a shared writing of this analogy with pictures for a couple mini-lessons. Then, the kids draw pictures for a book. They write a little about how learning to read is like learning to ride a bike. (This mini-lesson also teaches kids that it's OK to sometimes want a downhill book or sometimes try your luck with an uphill book, as long as you are mostly read flat road books)

Another mini-lesson I do is the one where I bring in my pile of reading to show the variation of what I like.

On another day, I also bring in one of my husband's aerospace engineering books to read aloud and show the kids how reading the words does not mean you are really "reading."

Lucy Caulkins talks about trying to create conversations between kids that encourages literate reading lives. (i.e. talking about special places we read at home, cozy nooks with lamps, etc... also, modeling how we are always carrying a book with us everywhere we go, just in case. talking about what you can use for bookmarks-- she says to think about yourselves as adult readers-- we want kids to lead the same kind of literate reading lives)

She also talks about using a "favorite book" sharing time as a springboard to begin the above conversations. Ask the children to bring in their very favorite books-- ignore that they are really mostly not good literature. Focus on the special times the book/s bring them and springboard your conversation off of those. (i.e. snuggling with mom or dad, always needing a story before bed, reading with a flashlight) She recommends only sharing one or two books a day and really focusing on the reading behaviors.

I'll write more mini-lessons if I can think of them!!!
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Forever book
Old 06-17-2006, 03:57 PM
 
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Bookmuncher's comment about having the children bring in a favourite book reminded me of something I did 2 years ago with my grade 5 students. I know that this is mainly a grade 1 discussion but it will work with any age. I asked the students to bring in a "Forever Book" -- a book that they love -- and tell everyone the reason they love it. As they shared their books, I quietly recorded all of the reasons on my clipboard -- would you believe that there were over 60 different reasons for loving their books. The reasons ranged from who gave them the book, type of illustrations, the story line, the gold on the cover, the size, and even what was spilled on page 3 (it was a one of those wonderful memory stories). I shared some of my "Forever Books". My most favourite is the one I received from Scholastic in grade 1 (over 35 years ago). I thought I was so grown up to own (and pay for)my very own book (all of the books at my house belonged to older siblings). (the price was 20 cents- )
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forever books
Old 06-17-2006, 06:05 PM
 
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Suezie.. .that is such a wonderful way to celebarte the reasons we love books!! I think maybe my kids could have a better idea of a really special book closer to the end of first- just because of maturity. Also- having them write the reason(s) it is so special at home might help eliminate repeats that so often pop up at this age.

It might even be great for the teacher to record what book the kids bring at the beginning of the year, and then at the end, have them choose their forever book(s) and add them to the one from the beginning of the year.

Thanks for sharing that!

BTW: I think most of what we're talking about could really be applied K-5... keep your great ideas coming!
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Finally I respond....
Old 06-22-2006, 04:07 AM
 
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Well, I finally sat down last night and tried to think through my first few weeks of mini lessons. Here is what I thought of...

*gathering to the rug/workshop procedures
*favorite summer reading memory
*reading survey/procedures for sharing
*how to be a good listener
*taking care of books
*choosing just-right books
*what to do when finished reading a book
*partner reading
*system for book check-out
*contents of reading bag- recording log
*conferences teacher/student role
*who to choose a comfy reading spot
*reading a variety of books

-----on to first unit....SCHEMA-------

I am looping with my class from 1st/2nd so I think I can re-establish my reader's workshop w/in the first 2 1/2 weeks and then jump into the "meat." Any other ideas? Also...what do you do for take home books? Any great systems to share?


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Any 3rd grade tchrs?
Old 06-23-2006, 10:45 AM
 
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I just got my book from B&N (I had to order it and it just arrived). Anyway, I've read through ch. 5 (Schema). Most of what everything DMiller says I know can be adapted for 3rd grade. I guess what I'm wondering is- what are your ideas? I thought about meeting with my school's Reading Specialist about coming up with a list of quality picture books that would be appropriate for my kiddos.

Also- do you think we can move at a quicker pace than what she mentions? When I taught kdg, we moved at a snail's pace to get procedures down. With 3rd- we still move slow, but a bit faster. I want to implement her strategies, I guess I'm just afriad of not doing it "right".

Thanks for your help and advice!
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books
Old 06-23-2006, 10:55 AM
 
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There are an awful lot of books that Miller suggests that are much more appropriate for 3rd than 1st. I guess it depends on your parents and the kids in your room, but there were some Rylant and Bunting books that I didn't use because of the content. I think that most picture books on that list could be used k-3 but understood at varying levels depending on age. I would start out with hers and build. Just be sure that the books you pick are truly puzzling or have content that is deep, because I and some collegues used lots of books for RWM this year, but found that some just didn't cut it. Some people will tell you that you should do a list of books because they are authors that third graders should know, but I wouldn't go by author- I'd go by the content of the books.

Pace-wise: I think you have to do what works best for your kids. Maybe someone who's taught third would be better equipped to answer this question. I've taught 2nd and I think her pace is a good one, only because it allows you to build on a strategy so it becomes something the kids truly own and understand. Much shorter, and I don't think that it would be something that they understand inside and out. The first couple weeks of a strategy are weeks for actually learning the workings of the strategy: how to do it, when to do it, etc. But the next several weeks brings the cool stuff! That's when they begin to integrate strategies with others that they have already learned; they come to conclusions, experiment with the strategy, apply it to other genres, etc.

Good luck!!
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forever book
Old 06-23-2006, 05:45 PM
 
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Fabulous idea and what a way to model for kids why we love books.... all for different reasons! Thanks!
 
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Jen, 3rd grade teacher here
Old 06-25-2006, 07:25 AM
 
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I also just got the book. I did ask our reading coach about picture books to help teach the strategies. She's looking into it.

I think the pacing will depend on your kids. If they haven't had the reading strategies taught to them, then you will have to work at a slower pace. My problem is we are a reading first school and we HAVE to use the HM(Houghton Mifflin) reading series. The series teaches most of the strategies but there's no way I can spend a month or two on each one. The series works on a different strategy each story. One week will be questioning the next modifying.

My plan is to suppliment with read alouds and modeling each strategy the first time around. The series spirals so the second time I will model again and have them help. I am hoping that I will start to see them using the strategies on their own during SSR. I also bought the Strategies That Work book and plan to use some of their ideas. ( sticky notes for one)

The HM doesn't really get into the schema, so I want to concentrate on that with my students. I also want to (need to) remember our job is to teach the reader. not the reading. I loved that quote in the book.

If anyone has any other suggestions for me on teaching the strategies along with HM, I'm all ears.
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In the same boat
Old 06-25-2006, 08:51 AM
 
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I'm in the same HM boat. i have struggled with the fact that HM doesn't teach the reader, it teaches reading. My grade partner and I have tried to get around HM to teach the reader but now our district has added Benhmark testing to each quarter that ties directly to HM, even though the district claims to be standards based not curriculum based!?!?!

I'm searching for a better way. I'm encouraged by the input from 3rd grade teachers that this can (and of course should) be done with 3rd.

I would love to hear more about what your mini lessons would be.


 
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Old 06-25-2006, 08:55 AM
 
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I have to teach with the A BEKA readers, so I am going to go through my books to see what strategies will go best with each story and then supplement with read-a-louds. I will have to write again when I get things a little more planned. How many of you use the Four Blocks Methods? Some of the things Debbie does seem to go with that method too. This will be my first year teaching reading in this way so I know this will be my learning year. I am glad we have this disscussion board to help with lessons and strategies.
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3rd Grade
Old 06-25-2006, 08:58 AM
 
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I guess I'm in a bit of a different boat than some of you. I'm fortunate (I think) that my school is not pushing our reading series (Scholastic). Which means, I get to teach the reader (smile) how I want...as long as I'm also integrating the required skills.

So...as far as mini-lessons, I think a lot of what D.Miller shares can be done with 3rd. They don't seem to take much time- which is good. What I'm going to look into are picture books that my 3rd graders would find interesting to teach these skills.
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Free AT LAST!
Old 06-25-2006, 06:41 PM
 
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I learned about RWM last summer from this board. As much as I tried to implement these wonderful practices into my classroom, I was bound to Reading First and the HARCOURT reading series. I never could get the two to gel. I've now transferred to a building that isn't Reading First and am prepared to dive in! As a 3rd grade teacher, I think I'll be able to move at a quicker pace and jump into schema along with thinking about reading. This depends on what the students have been doing with their reading before now. Harcourt teaches reading and I'm ready to teach the reader!
Now I need help..... 3rd grade is big on comprehension, however I always had the few that were still emergent readers. When does Debbie fit her phonics in? Is this something I do during the Reading Workshop while others are independent reading? I'm still going to incorporate the Fab Five componets of Reading First in to Reading Centers (Phonemic Awareness, Phonics, Vocab, Fluency, Comprehension). I'm coming from STRUCTURED, controlled environment to a more hands off approach with Debbie Miller. How do I let go?
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phonics
Old 06-26-2006, 05:32 AM
 
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I teach first grade, so I can't really help too much, but from what I know: Debbie wove phonics/phonemic awareness into her shared readings and morning message stuff. I think that is a great time to do it and in first grade, I also add another 15 minutes to that for phonics. However, in third, I understand that you'd probably need small group work for the kids that need a whole lot more than just what you are touching on through other techniques. I would just beg you not to hold these groups during independent reading! I know that it's hard to find a time to meet, but the core of Debbie's program is the authentic reading piece. In my school, teachers have tried to say that the independent reading part is one that those kids could be pulled out for, but I fought for them. I saw more growth in them than anyone else, and I strongly feel that they need it every day. Maybe you could structure your guided reading groups so that you "pretend" that you have 5 groups instead of 4 (for example). Schedule your lowest kids double-- one meeting time for guided reading and one time for direct phonics/word building stuff. (The other important part to this is that you won't have time to meet with a phonics group during Reader's Workshop, because that's when you do your most important conferring work)

Congratulations on being FREE! It must feel so good!!!
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Old 06-26-2006, 06:34 AM
 
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The conferring part is where I think I'm going to have the most trouble. It will be okay if I can turn our basil into a readers workshop activity. I was thinking of having the whole class read part one, then let them partner up for part 2. This would free up some time for conferences. Also I was going to have my independent reading time right before work stations and use that time for conferences. (Debbie Dillers book)

Hopefully, I will have parent help this year. The parent can take a group for guided reading and I can take another or work with a group that needs remediation. (universal Access-HM term)

I'm not sure what I'm going to do for mini lessons yet. I have a few of the read alouds mentioned in Debbie's book, but not many. I plan on using the read alouds in HM that go with each story. I really want to teach the text to self, text to text, text to world strategies. These were mentioned in the Miller book, but Strategies That Work seemed to explain it better.

I'm going to take it slowly, I figure that just by reading these books I'm going to be a better teacher because I see the reasons behind these strategies and they make sense to me. HM and their think alouds did not. In August, I'm going to the HM advanced training, it should be interesting...
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Old 06-26-2006, 06:45 AM
 
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I love your bicycle analogy. What a great way to explain reading especially to 3rd grade. They, for the most part, are pretty good on flat ground but not ready for the mountain yet. We need to tackle some hills (short chapter books), and do a little down hill and flat ground for fluency.
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Old 06-26-2006, 12:42 PM
 
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I have been going through my first reader and I think I could work some strategies in with some of the stories. The way I see it, and I could be misunderstanding, I need to teach/model strategies for using schema (text to self, text to text, and text to world), inferring meaning of words and text, and creating mental images. If I use the stories out of the reader to teach these concepts, then the children could put them into practice during their independent reading time with self selected books. Is conferring and sharing kind of the same thing? I guess I see conferring as sharing with a partner or with me and the sharing as doing it in the whole class meeting.

How are some of your days scheduled when you use DM's method? I know we have to be flexible, but I like to have a plan to follow.
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Old 06-26-2006, 05:42 PM
 
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Conferring is one-on-one teaching between teacher and student. It's when you slide your chair up and ask how it's going, check on what they are reading, maybe revisit a goal that they had set the last time and see if they have put it into practice, maybe listen to them read, etc...

Sharing is also very powerful if done correctly (I really struggle here). In the sharing time, the teacher needs to take responsibility for picking out several students who have been doing something that the other students can learn from (that's why the conferring is so important). Sharing can be on things as small as re-reading a page or carefully studying a picture to something bigger like using a strategy that had been talked about.

I've found that my kids definately don't put into practice what I've modeled unless I've allowed for a lot of practice (like in her gradual release model). There have to be plenty of times where kids work in partners on a book you have chosen and record their thinking in a way that they have seen me model. If you have to jump around and teach the strategy that your basal is stressing, then I wouldn't expect your kids to truly internalize until you have spiraled and taught that strategy several times.
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Old 06-26-2006, 07:27 PM
 
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What if I jumped around in their reader and focused on one strategy at a time? I really want to do this with my kids, but I am required to use the readers. I can see that this is more like a "whole language" method, and I am supposed to be using a more traditional approach, but I want to find a balance. One thing that some, not all, private schools tend to cling too are tradtional methods, I do see a place for that, but our kids are going to be in the world with children who have been exposed to a different way of thinking and reasoning. I don't want them to be at a disadvantage because I didn't try to find a good balance.
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Old 06-26-2006, 07:39 PM
 
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What if you used the HM book/stories as part of your listening center? All the stories come on tape. Then you could meet with guided reading groups to teach phonemic awareness,phonics, etc. Leave your Independent Reading as sacred time. Reggie Rhoutman-Reading Essentials hammers home the point that Independent Reading is a must and more time to should be committed to having readers read what they enjoy and feel comfortable with. This would free you up to confer
 
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Old 06-27-2006, 05:03 AM
 
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Your dilema is a tough one! I'm wondering what your school qualifies as "using" the reader? In our school, we are technically supposed to use it too, but there are not assessments that necessarily hold the kids accountable for anything except story comprehension. SO, I've gotten around it in this way:

Each week on Monday, I cover the story in some way. Sometimes, I just read it aloud and use it for a strategy mini-lesson, sometimes the kids partner read it, read it alone, or we'll do a shared reading, where I read most of it, and they use a strategy in one key spot. The key is that I DO NOT USE THE STRATEGIES that are suggested in the reading program. They are usually so shallow, and not really pertinent to the story. Real readers would never stop as many times as the teacher's manual requires, and real readers usually would not use the strategy that they have picked out on those particular stories (because most of the stories aren't usually very meaningful).

I make sure I cover the story (only to appease the district), but I study it and usually fit it into the strategy we are doing at the time with Debbie Miller stuff. I don't linger on the program stories-- I do it only once. I gain back an enormous amount of time because I do not continue to re-read or work with the basal story- it's in those times tuesday-friday that I do DM mini-lessons.

I think you can create a balance if you take the good pieces of each program. The readers can be good, in that you can use them to model and they are usually readable by most kids. At the same time, the authors usually stretch them too far in order to create comprehension lessons. They try to include too much, and it doesn't mirror real reading experiences. Your program will offer you the tradional pieces of vocab, a spelling pattern, and some other stuff that you can still do. If I were you though, I would look closely at whether or not you need to spend too much time on the actual "literature" that is contained in the program.
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Old 06-27-2006, 06:11 AM
 
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Thank you for your input. I was thinking about using the basal in a listening center, more as a review of the story, during work station time. You have given me something to think about. I'm going to have to free up more independent reading time.

After each theme in HM the students are tested for comprehension, grammar, spelling and vocabulary, oh and Writing. Reading and rereading the story does help with vocab. These scores are tracked, so it's important for the students to do well on them. I'm hesitant to not cover the stories because we rushed through our last theme covering two stories in a week and the students bombed parts of the test. The end of the year could have affected the outcome too! I'm just not sure...

I purchased Reading Essentials a week ago, patiently waiting for it to arrive. I live in CA and ordered the book used on amazon.com from a CA vendor, it's coming by way of Geogia. I'm not sure about the mail these days. I'm looking forward to reading the book!
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Old 06-27-2006, 07:02 AM
 
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Reading Essentials is GREAT for helping you figure out how to balance the basal with other practices. You are going to love it!
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Thanks
Old 06-27-2006, 12:48 PM
 
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I am going to look into the stories and see what I can pull out of some, and keep thinking of ways to integrate the lessons and strategies.
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one more idea
Old 06-28-2006, 04:53 AM
 
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I took an in-service day last year run by Vicki Benson, who wrote a book called "The Power of Retelling". She also emphasizes comprehension and schema. Her way of describing schema to kids is to relate it to a backpack. It is all the stuff you carry with you: memories, feelings, the people in your life, your junk. What you have is in your backpack and you can constantly add more. She also emphasizes the difference between summarizing and retelling. Summarizing is just listing the facts. Retelling is adding opinions, inferences and insight. You can use the backpack idea here again to explain it to the kids. If you want a summary of what I have in my backpack, I will give you a list. If you want me to tell you about it, I will explain how things got there and how I feel about them and what I do with them, etc. Even second graders could connect with this.
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Old 06-28-2006, 05:10 PM
 
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Where is the golden state are you? I am in LODI. Are we in the same area?
 
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A question to BookMuncher
Old 06-28-2006, 07:12 PM
 
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BookMuncher. you have found a great way of integrating the basal and DMiller. I am moving to a new grade (3rd) and school and I have been told I must use the basal and the tests from the basal. So how do you integrate the reading skills into DM mini-lessons? For example the first story covers the skill of story elements-character and setting. These elements are tested. I also want to integrate DMiller. Of course I will start with the text connections. DM spends a lot of time on connections, so each week do you include the basal skills with the DM strategies? I am thinking instead of using so much of the workbook practice of the skills, have students identify the basal skills while I am conferring with the book they are reading. I am presently reading the DM book. I have come across a solution to this dilemma, was hoping you could help. Thank you.
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Old 06-29-2006, 04:32 AM
 
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Hi!

If you come to a strategy in the basal that is actually tested, you may have to handle those a little differently. (I haven't experienced that-- usually our strategies, like predicting, are not tangibily tested) I would say that the week you are teaching character and setting, you might have 5 short mini-lessons, one for each day. MWF the minilesson would be on character and setting and TR it would be on schema. The next week, if you have another strategy that is tested (maybe problem and solution) you'd structure it the same way. It's going to take you a lot longer to cover her strategies this way, but I think that it's better to sprinkle them throughout-- the kids will have a deeper understanding/ vs. if you just do it compacted together, and then don't revisit it. If you get to a week that your basal says to hit on predictions, but it doesn't really assess it, I would feel confident in yourself that you WILL eventually get to predictions (in a much more meaningful way), and go to a 5 day full time schedule of teaching DM whereever you are.

Sometimes, the skills in the basal are so shallow, that even when you are doing a lesson on them, you can still touch on DM's stuff. Character and setting are mostly a matter of identification, so you could still model/practice connections while you're reading.

Also, remember that you can beef up the some of the skills that the anthology offers. While the basal requires children to only identify character and setting (and you could stop there), it will make them better readers if they learn WHY understanding the characters and setting will help them understand the book. For example, if a child is reading a pioneer book, identifying the setting in the first few pages will explain all the later references to dirt paths and foraging and wagons.

Just one more thing . I would be careful about having your kids only work on the strategy you have just taught during the mini-lesson. I only say this from experience-- I found, for example, that if we were learning about connections, they stopped reading non-fiction and picked fiction books that they knew they already had a connection with. The reading time took on a less authentic feel to it. It was kind of like every session had an assignment with it, and I didn't feel like I was creating an atmosphere where they could realistically applied the strategies. Once I finally realized this, I switched to "encouraging" them to try the strategy, as well as reminding them about other ones we had learned. Then, when I walked around and conferred, I would purposely pick out kids who were doing the strategy (or fudge it, and lead someone to do it), and then would make a big deal out of it during sharing. This lead to a much more authentic atmosphere where (hopefully) everyone was using the strategies they actually needed at that time.

GOOD LUCK!
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Fanny
Old 06-29-2006, 08:16 AM
 
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I'm in Lancaster. It's in the high desert.
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Thanks for advise
Old 06-29-2006, 10:06 AM
 
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Thanks for the help! You have given me some to think about. I have started another thread about basal and DM integration for anyone else who has had this experience.
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Strategies That Work
Old 06-30-2006, 09:46 AM
 
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I am re-reading this great book! Includes great strategies on reading comprehension with lots of examples. I am finding it to be very helpful.
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Hey bookmuncher!
Old 08-05-2006, 08:39 PM
 
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Would you please let me see your schedule? I liked what you said about adding 15 more minutes for phonics. I don't do morning message and was wondering if you would mind sharing and giving examples of what you do during the morning including the 15 minutes you add for phonics. I am having a hard time getting everything in.
We do: poem of the week-touching on a different aspect of the poem each day, then our calendar activities, journal writing, then a morning math activity from our Math Learning Center (Bridges) book. I sometimes feel like I want to scream if they ask me to fit one more thing in. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated. You can email me at ellisonmg@cox.net Thanks so much. Gaye
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Old 08-06-2006, 04:56 AM
 
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Sure! My schedule looks something like this:

During arrival, kids choose their books for the day; no morning work (this buys a lot of time)

As soon as the bell rings, kids know to make a circle on the carpet
9:00 Greeting Meeting/ Pledge of Allegience
9:05 Morning Message-- the message is always a meaningful message about the day. We usually use it to do one of the following: identify punctuation, add in missing punctuation, change all the two words into contractions or visa versa, underline the word chunk or onset we are studying that week, read silently (end of year) then read two mor times and talk about what fluent reading sounds like-- sometimes, there isn't much time, and so for routine's sake, I'll just read the kids the message, or a student will volunteer to read it. No matter what, we always do it.

To plan for my morning message, I don't pre-write all the messages, but what I DO do, is in my plan book, I write the skill I want to cover for each day. A typical week might look like: sight words, finding periods, adding periods, adding periods, finding the "at" chunk. I try to do my grammar skill enough that they will internalize it, because I don't teach it at any other time in my schedule except for one-on-one during writing.

9:10 Sight Words (part of word work): Depending on the day of the week, either I introduce the new words, the kids read them in different voices and cheers, or sometimes we play a word wall game. I keep this very very short!

9:14ish Phonics: Monday's I usually introduce a new word pattern. Tuesday- Thursday, we play some kind of game to learn it. Sometimes we walk around and Read the Room, adding words around the room to one big chart. Sometimes I put a lot of the words on the board and then we play a flashlight game where I say a sentence and they have to find the one that fits. Other times we do human word building, where the kids put on letter necklaces and I call out words. The kids who are in the word must come up and arrange themselves. As I tap each head, we sound it out and then sweep. At least once a week, they use their white boards and I dictate or we play some game that involves writing them. On Fridays, we do one of two things: Sometimes I do give little checks where I dictate two sentences to them that contain a couple of sight words, the new pattern, maybe some old patterns. I don't grade them, but I mark them and send them home. OR, we play a whole-word wall game where kids have to look at the entire wall to "mind-read" what word I'm thinking of.

9:30 Shared Reading-- sometimes it's a poem, song, big book, overhead, regular read aloud; usually shared reading is done for: the fun of it, fluency, concepts of print, word decoding strategies. I sometimes squeeze the basal into this slot!

9:45- 10:15 Reader's Club (Guided reading and three other reading "centers"-- referred to as clubs because they are working together on books)

recess/snack: Novel read aloud

10:40-11:25 Reader's Workshop (Mini-lesson- sometimes a read aloud, independent reading, sharing)

11:25-12:00 Writing (mini-lesson, independent reading, sharing) Sometimes we continue this into the afternoon. Also sometimes I take a little off of reader's workshop to lengthen writer's workshop.

Specials: I can usually squeeze another read aloud somewhere in here

_______________________________ ___________________________
Squeezed into the PM: I steal about 20 minutes from our HOUR Social studies block to do FYOE Reading or FYOE Writing (For Your Own Enjoyment) where kids are not restricted to reading a just-right book, but can read anything anywhere with anybody in the room)

Shared reading can be squeezed into social studies or science


HOPE THAT HELPS!!!
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Bookmuncher schedule
Old 08-06-2006, 05:59 AM
 
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Thanks for the information. I've been struggling with my schedule for weeks now. I want to do Guided Reading Groups and Reading Workshop. Your schedule makes so much sense. But how do you see every group during guided reading? How long do you meet with each group?

I've basically come to a schedule very similar to yours. Any information will be gladly appreciated!
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guided reading
Old 08-06-2006, 06:37 AM
 
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Most things I'm reading right now say that we really meet too long for guided reading. Lucy Caulkins and Regie Routman's books both agree that you only need to meet with one or two groups a day. If you're doing reader's workshop, then you can put a strategy group during it or a guided reading group, plus you are individually conferring with the kids every single day. I find that I get much more valuable insight from the reader's workshop piece than guided reading. I keep guided reading in my schedule more as a "monitoring" piece so that at least weekly, I am hearing all my kids read and am observing how or if they are using strategies and skills.

Also, something I found interesting was that Caulkins said that she visits so many classrooms where teachers are meeting with group after group after group while their kids are engaged in literacy centers. She says that kids won't view literacy centers as valuable if they do not see their teacher engaged in them. For that reason, I plan on possibly meeting with a guided reading group during Reader's Club, and then circulating and conferring with these groups for the other 15 minutes. Then, during my reader's workshop, I'll pull another guided reading group and then confer for the rest of the time. This way, I have my hands in both parts of the day. (And really-- I'll proably see every group twice a week)
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What's in your backpack?
Old 08-06-2006, 11:20 AM
 
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I really liked the story about relating schema to a backpack--heck, it even made me understand it better! Could I get a list of what's in your backpack? If so, you could attach it here or email it to me. I would really appreciate it! Thanks. Gaye

email: ellisonmg@cox.net
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Reader's Club
Old 03-24-2007, 03:01 PM
 
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I know this is an old message but I'm rereading some different pieces to rethink my day to include more reading/writing time and I am wondering if you would describe your reader's club centres briefly so I may understand what the students do in them. Are they in their guided reading groups? My centres normally follow a Diller approach and are small groups usually 2 this year and I mix up the abilities so they can help each other if need be.

Thanks Tonya S.
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Mini-lesson help...
Old 04-07-2007, 06:17 PM
 
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3-5 teachers:

Harvey and Goudvis have an excellent resource kit called, "The Comprehension Toolkit". It comes with all the tradebooks needed for their lessons. Their lessons focus on what our school calls the Fab Five:

Making Connections
Asking Questions
Making Inferences
Determining Importance
Visualizing
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Old 06-23-2011, 05:59 PM
 
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HI! I am new with reader's workshop. I love your mini-lessons suggestions. Could you send me your lessons for those mini-lessons to help me get started please.
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