Disruptive student - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      Classroom Management

Disruptive student

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
URMySunshine URMySunshine is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,413
Senior Member

URMySunshine
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,413
Senior Member
Disruptive student
Old 11-21-2014, 07:59 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

I have a student who is very disruptive. He has trouble staying in his seat, lays down on the rug during circle time, crawls around on the floor and under desks. Today he pushed his chair around the room. He constantly makes noises. Parents say he's not a problem at home and refuse to see a problem. They came in today to observe but of course he does nothing while they are watching. I am considering videotaping him to show the parents but would like to hear if anyone has ever tried this.


URMySunshine is offline   Reply With Quote

FMT FMT is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 583
Senior Member

FMT
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 583
Senior Member
I have a similar problem
Old 11-22-2014, 03:29 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

Believe it or not I have 2 students with these issues.

I have been told by a behavior consultant to ignore if the child is listening. The laying escalates into crawling. The 2 boys feed off of each other.

Looking for strategies.

I really think it more than defiance. It appears to me that there are mental health issues but not really getting the support needed from home.

School is aware but they are supportive on certain days.

Last edited by FMT; 11-22-2014 at 06:43 AM..
FMT is offline   Reply With Quote
dee's Avatar
dee dee is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2005
Posts: 6,657
Senior Member

dee
 
dee's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2005
Posts: 6,657
Senior Member
What grade?
Old 11-22-2014, 04:10 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

Are you talking Kindergarten or 4th grade?
dee is offline   Reply With Quote
teach & learn's Avatar
teach & learn teach & learn is offline
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 1,731
Senior Member

teach & learn
 
teach & learn's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 1,731
Senior Member
Get parent
Old 11-22-2014, 04:34 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

permission to video!
teach & learn is offline   Reply With Quote
URMySunshine URMySunshine is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,413
Senior Member

URMySunshine
 
Joined: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,413
Senior Member

Old 11-22-2014, 05:43 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

I teach first grade.


URMySunshine is offline   Reply With Quote
FMT FMT is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 583
Senior Member

FMT
 
Joined: Apr 2008
Posts: 583
Senior Member
Primary Grades
Old 11-22-2014, 06:34 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

2nd Grade to be exact
FMT is offline   Reply With Quote
Raychi Raychi is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 10
New Member

Raychi
 
Joined: Jul 2011
Posts: 10
New Member
Disruptive
Old 11-26-2014, 08:03 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

Don't video tape it could get you in a lot of hot water. I am dealing with same problem now. I went before ipst. Next step is on house with behavior specialist. It's exhausting! Good luck to you.
Raychi is offline   Reply With Quote
pa2te pa2te is offline
 
Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 120
Full Member

pa2te
 
Joined: Mar 2014
Posts: 120
Full Member

Old 12-01-2014, 09:14 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #8

I'd have the counselor come in and observe your class at random times through the week to take data on the student. Have you kept any data? Keep a tally chart on the student's desk and mark any time they are not on task or if they get a reminder but do not follow the direction. Send it home at the end of every day or each week for parent review and keep a copy in the students file to share with your school behavior specialist.
The parents cannot ignore hard numbers from you and from the school discipline team. I have a third grader who wanders and wiggles. He has a weighted lap pad and gets reminders if he is disrupting others- also on a special ed plan for behavior. I never thought i would be a teacher who would ignore that type of thing but it does depend ion the kid. Good luck. First graders have a hard time ignoring students who are all over the place so I can imagine it is hard on the whole class!!
pa2te is offline   Reply With Quote
thesupersub thesupersub is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2014
Posts: 10
New Member

thesupersub
 
Joined: Oct 2014
Posts: 10
New Member
disruptive student
Old 12-05-2014, 05:28 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #9

I am having the same concern, my second grade student runs out of class to run the hallways. He refuses to do his work and start fights with other students. His parents insist that it is the school's responsibility to restraint him, as he bites, kicks and spits at us. This student has threatened the livelihood of himself and others. His family has been asked to get their son evaluated,but they refused. I am afraid that he may hurt himself or someone else. What should I do?
thesupersub is offline   Reply With Quote
Fenwick Fenwick is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 418
Senior Member

Fenwick
 
Joined: Oct 2010
Posts: 418
Senior Member

Old 12-06-2014, 06:27 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #10

Quote:
...He refuses to do his work and start fights with other students. His parents insist that it is the school's responsibility to restraint him, as he bites, kicks and spits at us. ...
As a protection to other's safety and their right to learn ( and teach) in an environment free from physical abuse (or threat) the student needs to be removed (suspended) and if behavior continues expelled permanently from school. No student, staff member or school should have to put up with behavior which threatens basic right to an education. Parents do not have the right to insist the needs of their child overrules the rights and needs of other parents' children.


Fenwick is offline   Reply With Quote
sandycheeks sandycheeks is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Posts: 333
Full Member

sandycheeks
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Posts: 333
Full Member

Old 12-19-2014, 01:07 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #11

First I would have someone else come in and observe, just so you're not alone and you have some one to back you up. Like a social worker or counselor or whoever you have in this area. Or if you have a TA or 1:1 already then that's fine. You should be documenting his behavior and trying to note what caused the behavior and how it resolved to see if there's any patterns. Its more concerning to me if there are no patterns and if there is nothing that can make him come back to his task. I'm sure you've already put together a behavior plan, like a sticker chart at the very least. Once you've documented behavior and have another co-worker or even more than one who can back you up, then I think you would be armed enough to re-address this with mom and dad.
sandycheeks is offline   Reply With Quote
ian23505 ian23505 is offline
 
Joined: Dec 2014
Posts: 1
New Member

ian23505
 
Joined: Dec 2014
Posts: 1
New Member
Thoughts and Ideas
Old 12-20-2014, 06:55 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #12

Sounds like a challenging situation. I have a few thoughts that may help.

  1. Videotaping for your own purposes is not a bad idea. Kind of like reviewing game tape in sports. It might be helpful to see his behavior when you are not actually in the moment trying to manage the behavior and all of your other students. Might bring some valuable perspective to the situation. I don't think videotaping for the purpose of convincing the parents is a worthwhile path to pursue. If the parents are unwilling to acknowledge a problem then chances are seeing his behavior will cause them to point at your behavior in the classroom.
  2. I am wondering about a few things as they relate to this child:
    • How is he performing academically? What is his global academic profile?
    • Does he behave in this way throughout the day? Hallways, recess, lunch, music, etc.
    • How does he look at home? It's easy for a parent to brush off a question like, "Do you see this at home?" Get more specific the next time you have a conversation with them. Questions like, "What is it like to get him up and get ready for school? Getting ready for bed? Doing homework? Eating?" All of these questions may provide more insight into what is going on at home and allow you to make inferences that you might not otherwise be able to make.
    • What is going on in the child's life beyond the classroom? Any recent major life changes? Moving, divorce, new sibling, major illness of a close family member, death of a family member, etc.
    • Does he have any pre-existing medical conditions?
  3. I think that the idea of collecting data around this child is probably not a bad idea. My only hesitation to jumping full steam into data collection is that answers to the questions above may shed some light on the behavior and focus data collection in a more productive way.
  4. You may have already done this but I think it worth mentioning. Way back when I was teaching (I have been school administrator for the past ten years) and I stumbled upon kids like this, I would always secure coverage for my classroom for about an hour so that I could pull the child and have a 1:1 extended conversation with the child. Usually a quick conversation with the principal or assistant principal was enough to help them understand the situation and my approach so that they would help me get the coverage I needed. Most times this really helped and it only took one of these conversations to do so. If you can come to understand them and they know that you truly understand them, they will more readily comply with you. Also, they need to understand the extent to which their behavior is impacting you and their peers. 99.99% of students never want to disappoint their teacher, they just don't quite know how not to.
  5. Try to think of this as a puzzle. You have to be very methodical in figuring it out and eliminating the possible variables that are at play in the behaviors you are seeing.
Figuring kids like this out is incredibly challenging and takes a lot of physical and emotional energy. You can do it though. Just stick with it, try to really get inside the kids head, and enlist the help of the professionals around you.
ian23505 is offline   Reply With Quote
cheder cheder is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2012
Posts: 17
New Member

cheder
 
Joined: Sep 2012
Posts: 17
New Member
forget the parents
Old 12-26-2014, 11:30 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #13

This seems to be attention seeking behavior and in my experience ignoring it is a very bad idea because the behavior will escalate until he receives your attention and the attention of his friends- which is what he wants.

I have found that a rigid military style method works really well these kind of boys. When he is wandering around or crawling, you need to stop and directly instruct the class on how you want them to sit, tell them where you want their feet to be, their hands, how strait their legs should be.

Say, "I'm looking for my soldier." "I like the way Kevin is sitting, strait with his hands folded in his lap, He's ready to learn."

You must be careful not to give this child special attention when he misbehaves, that is why you direct the whole class. You can say, "I'm waiting for three kids, I'm waiting for two, I'm waiting for one kid to sit like a soldier." or When he makes noises in class you can say, "there is someone in this room who is making noises, if it is you please stop."

Don't use his name or even look at him. You want to keep most interactions with attention seekers positive and relationship building.

During circle time you should expect the children to sit like soldiers, when the attention-seeker starts to drift, direct him with a quick glance and hand gesture. If he ignores you, stop and wait, or stare at him till he sits down, but don't say anything to him.

Don't lower your behavior expectations, but if you find that he is having an extremely difficult time you might need to consider placing him in a chair instead of the floor or sending him out on a fake errand.


Always stay calm, do not get upset, do not ask him why he behaves this way, do not take it personally.

Consequence:

Since attention-seekers cannot be allowed to get away with any bad behavior he should receive a consequence for everything. Consequences should not be very harsh, and they should be administered in a way that provides him with very little attention.

This is one that might help motivate him to change:

Pull him aside before class and BRIEFLY explain that you will not tolerate disruptions. From now every time he says or does something that disturbs the class you will mark it down on an incident sheet. If the paper has more than six items on it in one week he will need to get it signed by a parent:


Tuesday 11:04 pushed chair across room
1:45 made disruptive noises during class
Thursday 9:23 laid down on the rug during circle time

(change the rules as needed, but I'm sure you get the general idea)

When you record the bad behaviors in the log sheet, you want to try and make sure that you don't give him attention, but that he still knows he's been caught. You can give him a special hand signal or you can quietly say, "that's three" and pull out the log and slowly record the incident.

There's one more thing you must realize about a kid like this. He wants so much for you and the other kids to think he's special, to notice him. Help him out. Connect with him, get close to him, give him the attention he craves in a positive way.

Let him know you and the other kids value his intelligent thoughts and ideas and contributions in class. Believe it or not, in his little kid way, he may be doing this to please you the way a little boy torments the girl he likes!

I'm grateful for all I've learned on this site and I hope this info helps you.
cheder is offline   Reply With Quote
DeDee76's Avatar
DeDee76 DeDee76 is offline
 
Joined: Sep 2014
Posts: 282
Full Member

DeDee76
 
DeDee76's Avatar
 
Joined: Sep 2014
Posts: 282
Full Member
school pyschologist???
Old 01-14-2015, 03:16 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #14

Make sure you have permission to video!!! Keep track of the ABC's: antecedent, behavior, consequence. Do you have a school psychologist? I would ask for him/her to observe. Of course you will need permission for them to observe. Good Luck
DeDee76 is offline   Reply With Quote
brigita's Avatar
brigita brigita is offline
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 528
Senior Member

brigita
 
brigita's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2005
Posts: 528
Senior Member
Cheder
Old 05-14-2015, 05:54 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #15

I found what you posted to be very helpful! URmySunshine, I had a parent observe a child like this years ago, but I had her stand in the bathroom and watch her son without his realizing it. She was in shock when she saw his behavior through the teacher's eyes. She became much more supportive after this experience. Perhaps the parents could observe again, but without your little one knowing it, so that he behaves in his typical way instead of performing for the parents?
brigita is offline   Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
Classroom Management
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 01:16 AM.

Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net