Trauma training - ProTeacher Community




Home Join Now Search My Favorites
Help


      The VENT

Trauma training

>

Reply
 
Thread Tools
NewCAteacher NewCAteacher is offline
 
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 335
Full Member

NewCAteacher
 
Joined: May 2016
Posts: 335
Full Member
Trauma training
Old 01-09-2020, 08:39 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #1

Our district will be participating in ongoing “trauma training” (trauma informed schools). If you’ve done this, what’s your opinion of it? Useful, eye opening, or another ineffective “trend”?


NewCAteacher is offline   Reply With Quote

MissAgnes MissAgnes is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2016
Posts: 1,296
Senior Member

MissAgnes
 
Joined: Apr 2016
Posts: 1,296
Senior Member
Very useful
Old 01-09-2020, 10:11 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #2

We have so many students in our school that have experienced trauma. I think trauma informed training is very to understanding and providing effective instruction and response to these kids.
MissAgnes is offline   Reply With Quote
TAOEP TAOEP is offline
 
Joined: Feb 2017
Posts: 1,823
Senior Member

TAOEP
 
Joined: Feb 2017
Posts: 1,823
Senior Member

Old 01-09-2020, 10:32 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #3

I thought it was extremely helpful in understanding students better. So many of the students I have taught (probably the vast majority) had experienced and were experiencing trauma in the lives. I found that if I started with a feeling of empathy toward the student, rather than frustration with their behavior or lack of effort or progress, I was much more effective in establishing a positive relationship and in teaching skills and knowledge.

Trauma informed teaching is not a magic solution for all the various problems and issues in education, but it is a tool that teachers need to use regularly.
TAOEP is offline   Reply With Quote
Hawkeyegirl1 Hawkeyegirl1 is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2016
Posts: 249
Full Member

Hawkeyegirl1
 
Joined: Aug 2016
Posts: 249
Full Member
Depends
Old 01-09-2020, 10:48 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #4

I have found it to be very useful, but the person who was leading the training was incredible! I think as with most trainings, it depends on the person leading the training.
Hawkeyegirl1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Teddi9192's Avatar
Teddi9192 Teddi9192 is online now
 
Joined: Feb 2007
Posts: 5,616
Senior Member

Teddi9192
 
Teddi9192's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2007
Posts: 5,616
Senior Member

Old 01-09-2020, 11:29 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #5

I see both sides. It is very helpful and useful but on the other hand it has been another way that students aren't held accountable for their actions.

We have a program in the works that sounds like it could be helpful. It is of the premise that it will teach coping and appropriate behavior in spite of what is going on in their lives.


Teddi9192 is online now   Reply With Quote
AlwaysSummer
 
 
Guest

AlwaysSummer
 
 
Guest

Old 01-09-2020, 01:55 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #6

Besides for not holding them accountable, it sets them up for failure. I was reading something the other day that said a large number of young men are in jail for killing abusive stepfathers. You know what affect this has on their sentence? Very little to nothing.
  Reply With Quote
Izzy23 Izzy23 is offline
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,580
Senior Member

Izzy23
 
Joined: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,580
Senior Member

Old 01-09-2020, 05:52 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #7

I've gone to several trainings on trauma and they always spent the majority of the time convincing us trauma was a real thing. Lots of stats, videos, studies, etc. They kept promising to share strategies for working with kids with trauma but...we always ran out of time! I was at one training for two days and it wasn't until the last hour that they began to talk about strategies to use in the classroom, and most of the conversation was, "if only we had more time, we could talk about how to address that..." So frustrating!

I believe trauma is real. Now tell me how to help these kids!

(If you learn anything useful, please share it!)
Izzy23 is offline   Reply With Quote
TAOEP TAOEP is offline
 
Joined: Feb 2017
Posts: 1,823
Senior Member

TAOEP
 
Joined: Feb 2017
Posts: 1,823
Senior Member
Reason, but NOT an excuse
Old 01-09-2020, 06:16 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #8

Quote:
Besides for not holding them accountable, it sets them up for failure. I was reading something the other day that said a large number of young men are in jail for killing abusive stepfathers. You know what affect this has on their sentence? Very little to nothing.
When done well, trauma informed schools do NOT use a person's trauma as an excuse for their actions. The background knowledge is a way to understand the triggers for a student's feelings and actions so that staff can intervene and prevent such actions as killing an abusive stepfather. NO ONE is saying that killing is OK. But neither are we saying that the abuse is OK.

Each person is accountable for their own actions. But understanding goes a long way.

With good intervention, the abused and angry child can learn how to establish boundaries, express thoughts and feelings in acceptable ways, and become a successful student.
TAOEP is offline   Reply With Quote
Haley23 Haley23 is offline
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 7,572
Senior Member

Haley23
 
Joined: Jul 2012
Posts: 7,572
Senior Member

Old 01-09-2020, 07:04 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #9

We've been talking about this at my school for several years and just did another PD this week. The presenter was sharing some research that shows one caring relationship can make the difference in kids growing up to be successful adults. We watched some interviews with Oprah where she talked about how school was the first place she ever felt important, and the shift between asking, "What happened to you" vs. "What's wrong with you" when a kid is majorly acting up.

Like anything else, it depends on how it's implemented, IMO. My admin has specifically said this is not an excuse for kids not to be accountable. We still need to have high expectations for their behavior and that "limit setting" is just as important as being kind and caring with kids. It's more about helping kids identify triggers and teaching them coping skills rather than just punishing them when something happens. Now at my school, when big incidents do happen the child receives a consequence AND support. We don't use the trauma as an excuse for a child's behavior, but we don't just punish them and then expect them to just get better either. And I will say we've had some really challenging kids make big turnarounds at my school.

That said, the academic expectations at my school are also insanely high and sometimes I feel that we're getting mixed messages. In the trauma informed stuff they'll talk about how kids need to be regulated before learning can happen and that sometimes the social/emotional needs need to take precedence. Yet we are also expected to get 100% of students to be making growth goals of one year's growth or more. So which is it? It seems like if we're going to really do the trauma informed work, we can't be so incredibly hyper focused on academic data and getting every single kid to perform academic miracles. I personally would love to see a "whole child" approach- and to have the school actually mean it, not just use it as lip service in a mission statement. Some kids are not going to meet insanely high academic standards are are still going to turn out perfectly okay.
Haley23 is offline   Reply With Quote
MissAgnes MissAgnes is offline
 
Joined: Apr 2016
Posts: 1,296
Senior Member

MissAgnes
 
Joined: Apr 2016
Posts: 1,296
Senior Member
NOT an excuse.
Old 01-10-2020, 09:24 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #10


Trauma is not an excuse, and kids aren't just given carte blanche for behavior because of it.
Understanding trauma helps understand the issues these kids face, and strategies to help them learn despite the trauma.


MissAgnes is offline   Reply With Quote
LoveMyNature LoveMyNature is offline
 
Joined: Jan 2020
Posts: 127
Full Member

LoveMyNature
 
Joined: Jan 2020
Posts: 127
Full Member
Very useful!
Old 01-10-2020, 09:31 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #11

I learned so much! Gave me great ideas for supporting and identifying students who had trauma. Also gave me the “big picture” and appropriate strategies for them. And for me!

Do it!
LoveMyNature is offline   Reply With Quote
Zia's Avatar
Zia Zia is offline
 
Joined: Jan 2015
Posts: 17,007
Senior Member

Zia
 
Zia's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2015
Posts: 17,007
Senior Member

Old 01-11-2020, 05:45 AM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #12

I agree with everything Haley said, but especially this:

Quote:
In the trauma informed stuff they'll talk about how kids need to be regulated before learning can happen and that sometimes the social/emotional needs need to take precedence.
Ya gotta Maslow before you can Bloom.
Zia is offline   Reply With Quote
kidsrterrific's Avatar
kidsrterrific kidsrterrific is offline
 
Joined: Nov 2012
Posts: 1,154
Senior Member

kidsrterrific
 
kidsrterrific's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2012
Posts: 1,154
Senior Member
1 agree with Haley
Old 01-11-2020, 12:06 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #13

I tutor children and adults that are part of a homeless population that have been given long term shelter (mentoring, etc.) by a non profit organization.

That is trauma. To have no home. And...why they have no home.

No excuses. Teachers just need to know where they are coming from.
kidsrterrific is offline   Reply With Quote
Summerwillcom Summerwillcom is offline
 
Joined: Jun 2014
Posts: 2,950
Senior Member

Summerwillcom
 
Joined: Jun 2014
Posts: 2,950
Senior Member
Same opinion as Haley
Old 01-11-2020, 02:06 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #14

"Like anything else, it depends on how it's implemented, IMO. "

Our school implemented (or acted like it) PBIS w/ no consequences.
Most of us were never even really trained in anything, but the basics of it.
Kids were not accountable for their behavior and excuses were always made.
Of course, insanity ensued.
Listening to the trauma informed regulation zones makes total sense to me.
There needs to be follow up accountability though. I have a feeling it will be used as nothing but an excuse at my school, but I am done.
After this school year, I am retiring. The system here is broken and I can't fix it.
Summerwillcom is offline   Reply With Quote
AlwaysSummer
 
 
Guest

AlwaysSummer
 
 
Guest

Old 01-11-2020, 02:59 PM
 
Clip to ScrapBook #15

I stick by MY truth. I was not going to set up my students for failure. The police aren't going to ask questions and look for triggers. Trauma doesn't get you anything from the judge either. As much as I don't agree with the system, this isn't the system. This is the parents and the idea that all parents are trying. There are bad parents. It wasn't my job to teach students manners and self regulation. That is a parents obligation. Maybe I a a dinosaur. This why I'm "unofficially" retired.
  Reply With Quote

Join the conversation! Post as a guest or become a member today. New members welcome!

Reply

 

>
The VENT
Thread Tools




Sign Up Now

Sign Up FREE | ProTeacher Help | BusyBoard

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 06:20 AM.

Copyright © 2019 ProTeacher®
For individual use only. Do not copy, reproduce or transmit.
source: www.proteacher.net