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How are you helping your struggling readers through distance learning?

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How are you helping your struggling readers through distance learning?
Old 03-29-2020, 03:46 PM
 
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Hello, fellow Title I reading specialists,

I am wondering how all of you are providing intervention help through the challenge of distance learning? I am struggling to figure out how to reach my students in this way and would welcome thoughts and recommendations, thanks!


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Raz Kids?
Old 03-29-2020, 04:44 PM
 
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There are free online subscriptions, and they have books leveled aa to z. I can use zoom to conference, and have Raz-Kids open and share the screen and have them read to me. I can coach them as they read. At least thatís my plan for this coming week. We just got permissions slips to zoom with them.
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Old 03-29-2020, 05:37 PM
 
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Thanks so very much for starting this thread! I, too, am really struggling how to support my Title Reading and Math kids without adding more stress to parents and/or students. I have thought of a choice board or a Symbaloo board of learning opportunities, some one-on-one or small group tutoring or class meetings on Zoom, Flipgrid activities, and continuing on some of our weekly online activities, like Readtheory.org, IXL, or Accelerated Math. But how much is too much AND how to make it all easily accessible to my parents, that is what is really sort of holding me back right now.
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Thanks, Munchkins!
Old 03-29-2020, 06:11 PM
 
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I appreciate you sharing your plan to Zoom with the kids! I will talk to my supervisor about that option- conferencing with my kiddos would be a great way to maintain a relationship with them and have them practicing reading with me!

Last edited by Kat's Mom; 03-29-2020 at 06:12 PM.. Reason: spelling error
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Yes, Dacota!
Old 03-29-2020, 06:19 PM
 
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The kids we service, of all kids, do NOT need extra work on top of what is assigned from their classroom teachers. I have been working with a few of my colleagues who have the lion's share of my kiddos to do some co-planning of lessons together, and the learning support teacher and I are teaming up to meet the needs of those kiddos by co-planning together.
I also believe that many of the students that I service do not have supportive families who will help the kids with these online assignments. (Some just aren't technologically skilled enough to help their children.)
The primary teachers did a choice board for this coming week, and I contributed a couple squares of activities myself to the entire board, since our entire school is a Title I school.
Without giving the kids tangible materials to have in front of them, I am struggling to provide instruction, which normally comes so naturally to me. These are challenging times!


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Old 03-31-2020, 06:42 PM
 
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Our grade level teams were supposed to coordinate with academic specialists but chose not to. I have seen the work they are asking students to do in K-5. Most of the work is reading heavy and well above the level that my students are currently working at. (My husband teaches 6th grade science and ELA and is hearing the same thing from his middle school families. The struggling readers are getting bombarded with things to read from all of their teachers!)

I'm at a Title I K-5 school where home tech access is limited, 70% of families are ESL, parents are still working in essential jobs and/or there are a lot of siblings at home. We are not allowed (by our district) to do synchronous learning (group or 1:1 conferencing), introduce new material, or input grades for anything.

I use Seesaw to communicate with my families already. I've added home learning content for now. I'm basically taking the routines we do regularly and transferring them to a remote format. It's not even close to as intensive, but it's 20 minutes a day of review and practice that is at the instructional level of my students. I'm doing things like sending videos I'm making of phonemic awareness activities, phonics drills (sound cards, word reading) and links to online decodables. I've also sent a few simple activities that they can do on any paper at home (like recording myself reading words for dictation, or sending them words to syllable map).

I have heard other people with concerns about adding more to the plate of struggling kids, including here. I would argue that my students will not attempt or complete a good portion of the work that their classroom teacher is sending because they know the work they get from those teachers is too hard, and they don't have help at home. That was my feeling, and it's baring out in #s. I have 75% of my students checking in and most of the classroom teachers are 25-50%.

As a school, we are also sharing activities on our school facebook page because we get quite a bit of traffic there. Staff are doing daily read alouds and teachers who are filming instruction are posting videos if they would apply to broad groups of students (like practicing letter names and sounds or our PE teacher posting simple at home exercises).
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Old 03-31-2020, 08:36 PM
 
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I'm a sped teacher, not a title 1 teacher, but I can share what I'm doing for my reading students. For each grade level I see I'm making a daily 15 minute video that they can follow along with covering some of our regular routines. For example, in Kindergarten I'm doing our Heggerty phonemic awareness routines, a letter/sound deck, some word reading, sight word practice, and a small amount of phrase/sentence reading. For each task, I give students about 3-5 seconds of think time (Depending on what the task is) and tell them they should try to say the answer out loud before I do. Then I will say the correct answer so they can check themselves.

When it makes sense, I'm doing a visual 1-2-3 count down on my fingers to show them when I'll be saying the answer. For example, "What word do these sounds make? /c/.../a/.../t/ (pause and show students 1, 2, 3 fingers)...cat." My P was really insistent that if we were going to do intervention type lessons she didn't want kids practicing wrong, and this was the best way I could think to address this. We were also warned against assigning "parent work"- they want the child to be able to do the work 100% by themselves. I'm in a low SES school. Theoretically, with these videos the only thing the parent has to do is ask the child to stay on task- no instruction needed on their part.

K-1 is using seesaw and I've also put in a little exit ticket where they will read a short page to me after watching the video, and they can record themselves and send it to me. 2nd is doing google classroom and if there is a way to do that on there, I don't know it. I was going to ask our instructional coach tomorrow just in case there is something I'm missing. For them, I put out a decodable text for them to read, but I have no way to check how well they're actually reading it, unlike seesaw. Moving forward I may also put up a couple of explode the code pages they can complete using Kami for that 2nd grade group.

Tomorrow is our first actual day of online learning. I'm going to see which students are consistently checking in and doing the work, and may make changes based on that as far as differentiating even more. I don't want to do several different lessons per grade level if kids aren't really watching them/doing the work. Once I see who is consistently doing the work I can differentiate more for those kids where it makes sense.
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Thank You, Everyone!
Old 04-01-2020, 06:18 AM
 
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Thank you, everyone, for all your input and suggestions! It is very helpful, and VERY appreciated! Again, Kat's Mom, thank YOU so very much for starting this thread. <3
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Old 04-01-2020, 10:34 PM
 
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Hi, everyone!

I so appreciate your willingness to share how you approaching things from a reading specialist angle. Today I co-planned with colleagues to prepare for "phase 3" of our online learning to start on Monday. I wrote fluency passages based on topics/word patterns that teachers were teaching when we closed our school. The LS teacher and I were able to create a Magic Treehouse unit for use with our struggling intermediates reading a grade level or two behind. We are using Google Classroom for primary and intermediate students and have opted not to Zoom for various legal reasons. We have families sending us pics or videos that parents take with their cell phones to our e-mails. I've created incentives for my Title I kiddos to complete assignments by asking them to send me pics via e-mail, and I am then e-mailing them silly pictures of my dogs doing crazy poses with books. I am hoping they'll be motivated by that!
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