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Bobbies Bobbies is offline
 
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Are they really going to do zoom for the beginning of the next school year?
Old 05-23-2020, 01:51 PM
 
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What is everybody hearing regarding the status of schools starting in the late summer ? I am a retired teacher, now a substitute in a district that I have never taught at, so I don't know the teachers very well here and retired due to medical reasons back in 2012. My teacher friends at the school where I used to teach are now doubting that they are going to even neeting substitutes since they will be starting school the same way school has been done for the last 3 months here, all of it being on zoom. Does everybody really think that we are going to go through the beginning of next year on zoom without the need for substitutes? Do you think the substitute profession is going to end?


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Maybe temporarily?
Old 05-23-2020, 01:56 PM
 
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Who knows if we will start the next year with distance learning or have to do it again at some point next year. I don't even want to think about that! I sure hope we are back, but who knows! Each day seems like a different possibility!

As far as substitutes, I don't think long-term subs will be out of work. They will still be teachers who will probably want maternity leave, even if it is e-learning, in my opinion. Maybe day-to-day substitutes will be out for awhile, but I doubt it's going to end for good. Once there is a vaccine widely available, and schools can be in session full time without having to worry about sickness, I'm sure they will come back. Who knows when that will be, though.
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Old 05-23-2020, 02:06 PM
 
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Pretty sure it's all speculation still.

All of the districts I know are planning for at least 3 scenarios:

Buildings remain closed and students working at home (like we're doing now)

Schools reopen

A hybrid situation involving some at-home learning and some in-person learning in school buildings

We all wish we knew now, but it's too early to make a final decision.
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Old 05-23-2020, 02:13 PM
 
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I don’t think school will resume as the “normal” that we were accustomed to last year & years prior.

We begin school in July(teachers) & August 2nd (kids).

Which is not too far away considering staff & parents want to know ASAP so plans can be made

My district has already developed 3 options plan & actively discussing best options


My district is definitely planning on following CDC guidelines-especially social distancing


Many district including mine are considering reducing school capacity by:

1. A hybrid of in class & online for 3-12 th grades.(rotate days or 1/2 day schedule.

2. PreK-2nd- attending daily

3. Using non-homeroom teachers (Academics coaches, intervention teachers, Gifted teachers, music teachers, P.E. Teachers, etc) to teach small groups to reduce class sizes

4. There will be many teachers teaching from home..


There may not be a huge demand for substitutes until school resumes back to normal capacity & operations.

Schools can utilize existing staff to sub if needed Until school resume normal capacity
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Old 05-23-2020, 02:22 PM
 
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I don't know. Nobody seems to know. The longer kids stay out of actual school buildings, the more likely the massive loss of teaching jobs especially if systems/states adopt standardized online lessons per grade/subject

Not having physical school and after school programs would be a terrible problem for working couples. It already is. I think we will be weighing risk against benefit as this becomes a long term problem. Day care centers are reopening soon in my area. That will help with the baby but what do you do with the seven year old at home? Many people may still choose to avoid restaurants and gyms, but most people want to go back to making their living without the interruptions of caring for and schooling their kids at the same time.

I think those who technically are more vulnerable (I know anyone of any age can contract and die from the virus) will be required more and more to take their own precautions. The people without the masks are already increasing all around my town although the number of active corona cases is up. It's feeling more and more like every man for himself. Women seem to feel a larger sense of responsibility to protect others. Do you feel your health or age makes you vulnerable in a school setting?

It will be interesting to see what happens when large numbers of people congregate again in churches, restaurants, and beaches. Those who never believed in Darwin might get a lesson in survival of the fittest-or maybe not.


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No Zoom
Old 05-23-2020, 02:38 PM
 
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We donít use Zoom. Itís not secure enough.
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Old 05-23-2020, 02:55 PM
 
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I have no idea but I think late summer/early fall reopening will happen. However, I think there are going to be better platforms developed in the event online schooling becomes necessary, Zoom as it is right now just isn't effective. We need a platform that is secure, takes attendance, allows easy communication with students and parents and an actual centralized online curriculum so that even with video teaching, students have digital resources such as virtual manipulatives, a place to access their files and turn in work, a way for things to be graded, etc. there are bits and pieces but i bet there are people working on building something right now because it will be moneymaker.

I actually wouldn't mind transitioning into a virtual teaching job. The part I like best is developing curriculum and advancing my tech skills.
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Old 05-23-2020, 04:46 PM
 
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Nobody knows. Things change too fast to make decisions like that now.

We have plans in place for regular, in person start, late in-person start, and remote start. There is an early start option from the state, but we start early enough that it wouldnít benefit us to do a July 20 start.
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no matter what, be prepared to go online
Old 05-23-2020, 05:20 PM
 
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I'm currently on one of the planning committees developing our remote learning plan for fall. Here's what I think can be said for certain:

- no matter what, we will need a really solid, fully online option. There are many teachers and students who are high risk (or live in high risk families) who won't be safe to come back in the building, even in small groups. And there are families who would rather just have the kid stay home than deal with a hybrid schedule. Plus there's a handful of kids who are truly excelling with online learning. If we don't have a simple, cohesive option for these kids parents will seek out a virtual charter or homeschool on their own. And while I'm a big supporter of homeschooling, if these families leave we also lose funding and jobs. By fall, each district needs a robust online option ready to go, K-12. Full stop.

- no matter what, we will need to find a way to serve some students face to face daily. Special Education programs (especially moderate/severe), high school votech/hands-on classes, prek, ESL newcomers, kids in dangerous home situations with no childcare... we'll need to prioritize making sure these kids are served. Devoting time, staff, space, bus seats, and other resources to these groups might limit what we're able to do with "regular" students, but I think it will be necessary. Both to avoid being sued and to make sure our most vulnerable kids don't miss an entire year of school.



The rest is more fuzzy. I will say people with power I've heard from are hinting that they don't think it'll be safe to come back full-force. That doesn't mean we won't - I could definitely see a situation where there's pressure from the government and community to do 'regular' school even if science tells us it's not safe. But I think the most likely scenario is that in every school/district there will be some kids staying home daily, some kids coming to school daily, and the majority of kids doing some modified schedule (hybrid, half-days, coming to school but staying in one room with a teacher proctor and doing work for all classes online, 6-12 online + k-5 in-person utilizing middle/high school spaces and teachers to split up groups, etc, etc, etc)


The best advice I can give to any teacher right now is start preparing to have a simple, cohesive, yet robust online curriculum ready to go before day 1. It doesn't have to be everything you teach, but it should hit all the major standards. If we're fully online, you're covered. If we're in the room in safe, socially distanced groups, that means we're contact tracing/quarantining after exposure, which means you'll have kids consistently disappearing for 2-week stints and you'll want them to be able to keep up online. If we're doing school as usually, well, frankly, you're probably in an unsafe work environment and the safest option for you and your students would be for them to do your online work while sitting in your room.
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Old 05-23-2020, 06:08 PM
 
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Southerfried

I agree. Those are all factors that my district is discussing.


The main factor is social distancing of 6ft apart in classrooms.


The total capacity of students & teachers in a school & classroom will need to be reduced for social distancing purposes.


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Nobody knows
Old 05-23-2020, 06:54 PM
 
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Itís extremely fluid and varies significantly by state.

Itís very possible that many teachers in the public school system could be doing everything online again in the fall. This is a aspiration of certain highly influential unelected (though they have elected officials in certain states doing their bidding) ďreformersĒ who are attempting to use this situation, rightly or wrongly, to impose their agenda.

With that said, I have absolutely zero influence over these decisions and donít get paid enough to plan for or think about the hypotheticals.
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Old 05-23-2020, 07:08 PM
 
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My principal is fairly confident that we will start in person in some capacity, but is also confident that it will be different.
Quote:
The best advice I can give to any teacher right now is start preparing to have a simple, cohesive, yet robust online curriculum ready to go before day 1.
And here lies the difficulty, right? Our curriculum is not meant to be delivered online. So do you expect teachers to create an entirely different curriculum, to be delivered in a way that they weren't trained? If teachers are doing a hybrid model, are they expected to be teaching students every day (half at a time) AND providing teaching and curriculum to the half of the students that are at home? Neither of those are feasible. And with huge cuts, no districts have the money to invest in good online programs.
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Old 05-23-2020, 07:08 PM
 
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I don't see things changing from a normal schedule. I just don't see schools not opening up.....parents/guardians need to work and states/districts have no money to make changes.

I hope I am wrong, but I just don't think my old district will not open. We provide so much for the students, it is a worry what is going on now at home.
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Old 05-23-2020, 07:50 PM
 
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Quote:
Pretty sure it's all speculation still.

All of the districts I know are planning for at least 3 scenarios:

Buildings remain closed and students working at home (like we're doing now)

Schools reopen

A hybrid situation involving some at-home learning and some in-person learning in school buildings

We all wish we knew now, but it's too early to make a final decision.
I totally agree with all of this.

I know it's hard to plan when you don't know what is going to happen. I think that if you need the money that comes from your sub job, you would be advised to see what else is out there in case schools start online next year.
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Old 05-23-2020, 08:09 PM
 
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I think "plan A" in my area is to open on a regular schedule (with precautions such as masks and frequent cleaning/hand washing) but have an online platform ready to go for 2 week closures if there is an outbreak connected to your school/district. I was hoping the mask thing would go by the wayside by then as I can't imagine having to wear one all day at school. District recently "assured" us that they're ordering them and they're confident they'll be here on time. Ugh.

There is also a lot of planning being done for hybrid models were students only come to school in person 1-2 days per week. I have such a hard time picturing this and it worries me greatly. If we're doing a hybrid schedule, it means we still don't have the economy going (students not at school= parents not at work). My state is in such dire trouble after 2 months of this. If it carries on for another year, we're not going to have public schools to go back to.
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Responding to Sbkangas5 (sorry, don't know how to quote)
Old 05-23-2020, 08:41 PM
 
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It is difficult. And it will be especially tricky to start the year online, not knowing the kids. If we do have to start online, I would love the idea of spending 2-3 weeks bringing in small groups of kids (~5 per teacher) for 2 day 'boot camp' orientations - teach them all the tech skills, build relationships, train the parents, do some basics diagnostics, then go online.

Also remember that even if we are in a classroom, we can't teach like normal. Even spaced 6 ft apart, sharing air with others for extended periods in a confined space is the biggest way to spread these kinds of diseases. So having class discussions, delivering lessons, doing groupwork, are all going to be really tricky. Even in a classroom we may have to rely heavily on technology to help kids collaborate virtually and cut down the spread from talking.

As for an entirely different curriculum in a way you weren't trained... I can say as someone who taught myself to teach using a blended model and have been running a flipped classroom for 6 years now, it's truthfully not as hard as people think (caveat - there are obviously some classes like choir that are much trickier to do online. Those subjects may genuinely have to pivot to a different focus - music appreciation/theory - until it's safe to do them in person). But assuming you teach a 'regular' core or elective subject, it's really just a matter of taking the routines of class and using the right digital tool to make it happen. A lecture/presentation becomes a screencast of your slides with you narrating over them. A class discussion becomes a message board to post and reply on. A journal entry becomes a Flipgrid post. Obviously it's not perfect, but this is one of those situations where perfect can't be the enemy of good. AND if we're are doing this right, every teacher should not have to make a full curriculum by themselves. There can be one 5th grade math curriculum for the school or district.

As to the hybrid model - it's the same amount of work as regular teaching. You plan 5 days of instruction - 2 'live' in class and 3 'independent' at home. So in a high school biology class, for example. The class is working on cellular division. Suzy is assigned to come to school Monday and Tuesday. As part of last week's assignment, you assigned a Crash Course video and a section of the textbook to read. So when Suzy comes in on Monday, you jump into the teaching - doing a quick overview, answering questions, having a discussion. Each of the 13 kids in your class has their own set of cellular division stage models and they work on arranging them in order. You discuss some more. You give them a worksheet, go over the directions and have them highlight a few things, and work through the first question together. Then Suzy puts it in her binder to take home. Tuesday, Suzy comes back to school. You do a lab on cellular division. Wednesday, Suzy stays home. She writes her lab report and sends it to you (email, google classroom, whatever system you've set up). Thursday, she pulls her cellular division models back out, re-sorts them, glues them in her notebook and labels them. She pulls out the worksheet you explained in class and finishes it. She hops on her computer and studies from a cellular division quizlet you've sent her. Then she works on another quizlet set reviewing terms from earlier in the year, or hops on a practice site like USATestPrep to do practice questions you've assigned her. Friday, she watches a Crash Course video and reads a textbook passage on DNA replication (next week's topic).

Johnny is also in your class. He is assigned to come to school on Wednesday and Thursday. So on Monday and Tuesday when you're doing cellular division with Suzy, he's finishing up last week's independent work at home. On Wednesday and Thursday you do the exact same discussion, activity, and lab with Johnny that you did with Suzy earlier that week. You'll send home the same exact work for him to do on Friday, Monday, and Tuesday before you see him again next week.

Also notice that since kids are only coming to school 2 days a week, you don't have students on Friday. On Friday you're going to team meetings, planning the next round of work, holding office hours, hosting a Google Hangout with a kid who was absent, and grading the lab reports and worksheets that your students turned in last week. Same amount of students. Same amount of work. Just a little extra repetition and planning ahead.

And I'm with you that it's a lot of work. But I also know that there are lots of programs out there for all subject areas that run completely online. Things like K-12 and Connections Academy that offer full-service school-at-home, plus smaller providers that specialize in certain subject areas. But a parent who wanted to could very easily put together a curriculum at home for their kid without utilizing the school system. If we don't offer something, that's what they'll do.

Plus, let's not kid ourselves. The likelihood of a second wave coming and us having to do another round of school from home is very likely. Better to start the year with routines and tools in place that can carry us through that than to try to have a 'normal' school year and get caught unaware like we were this time around.
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Old 05-24-2020, 04:57 AM
 
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Southernfried, I certainly agree that is is not optimal but feasible with certain ages and subjects.

The thought of kindergartners sitting in one spot, on a computer, not talking or interacting is sad. It would be downright harmful to their development.
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Old 05-24-2020, 06:11 AM
 
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My Mom's longtime retired teacher friend who became a sub said her district is starting IN-PERSON in the fall.

She also said those aged 80 (and up) will no longer be employed. My Mom's friend is 81 and they must know her DOB since she put it on the employment app when she applied, so we'll see what happens there.
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Old 05-24-2020, 07:00 AM
 
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I am currently a teaching assistant after retiring from teaching band and music. Many of us are one to one assistants for individual students. This has required sitting right next to the student while helping him or her with whatever academic work is happening. I am not sure how to do that from 6 feet apart. In many cases, I wouldnít even be able to see what the student is working on.

We also have a few non verbal autistic students in our school. One likes to sit on laps and be picked up when she gets upset or has a meltdown. That is the best way teachers have found to calm her down. Plus, the student and a few others require someone to hold their hand when taking them to other rooms in the school building for specials classes, lunch, and other things. How do we keep track of them in this instance?

Whenever we go back into the classroom, I see my job for next year being kind of a security guard to make sure students stay six feet apart and wear masks.

I have been interviewing for music jobs for the fall., but I think ideally I will focus on trying to get a job that would allow me to work at home. I have other skills and previous work experience from before I started teaching that can be transferred over to another type of position.

Someone on here mentioned that one district was thinking of having subs available for online teaching as well in the case that a teacher gets sick, with the virus or otherwise. Maybe there will be a way for that to happen. At any rate, I canít imagine that schools would be online the entire school year and subs would eventually be needed. Maybe even more because teachers would be more likely to stay home if they get sick.
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Old 05-24-2020, 08:25 AM
 
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My school district has asked us to get 2 weeks of review for rising 1st graders and the first nine weeks of instruction ready to go online for next year. They are giving us 3 weeks to do this (in addition to closing down our rooms, completing report cards/paper work, and having end of the year meetings via zoom). As a Kindergarten teacher, this is not possible. I do not have materials that can be readily uploaded to google classroom. This content does not exist, and has to be created from scratch. I do not have powerpoints and google slides ready to go because this is not how you teach kindergarten. Everything we do the first nine weeks is practical, hands on, and social.

Instead, we have to create learning videos for each lesson and topic. This is what we have been doing during the closure; in addition to small groups and one-on-one via zoom. It is immensely time consuming, and we cannot create 11 weeks of content in 3 weeks. This would be almost 500 videos to cover all subjects and topics. There are only 3 kindergarten teachers in my district (one elementary school, one middle, one high school). We do not have a curriculum team for the district. We are the ones responsible for creating this content.

We have agreed we can get the two weeks of review and the first two weeks of fall completely ready to go. We will outline the other 7 weeks. We agreed we would not be spending the summer (unpaid) creating learning content. We are due back mid August, and we need a break.

For younger grades, it is not as simple as using screencastify to go through materials, flipping a classroom, or assigning reading materials with response questions. My students cannot type, cannot recognize numbers/alphabet, cannot read, and will need an adult to sit with them for all learning activities throughout the 1st nine weeks. I've researched online Kindergarten and every program I have found basically states that parents need to be a learning facilitator and available several hours a day for their children. Many of our parents are still working. Kids were with neighbors, grandparents, or in day care as children of essential workers. This is a title 1 school, and most parents didn't get to work from home.

I am very concerned about being online only next year. I just don't think K students should be sitting and learning via videos/zoom. I don't think most of them will learn to read this way.

My nightmare scenario is allowing parents to choose an in person/online mix OR completely online. There wouldn't be another teacher assigned to the online class. It would be me. I would have to fully engage my hybrid class and those choosing online only.
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Old 05-24-2020, 08:35 AM
 
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DRV, yes to everything you said about the concerns of teaching K with this model.
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Old 05-24-2020, 09:52 AM
 
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I totally agree with you. If you read my first post, I said I think there's a segment of the school population that will need to come on campus full time, separate from whatever online/hybrid plan the rest of the students are on (unless things get really, really bad - like the whole state is back in quarantine again).

-prek, kindergarten, maybe first grade
- certain Special Education students (like my 7th grade LD inclusion students are probably fine, but a self-contained autism room probably needs to meet on campus)
- ESL newcomers
- high school votech/occupational classes that rely on hands-on learning
- certain kids with extremely high needs, unsafe family situations, and no childcare

Prioritizing the needs of these students may mean limiting what we can do with others. For example, if we did a hybrid model K-5, we'd have enough staff and space for kids to come twice a week. But it might be that a school decides kindergarten and first grade need to come every day, so they're going to use additional teachers/classrooms in the building to make that happen. Because of that, there may only be enough staff and space for 2-5 to come once a week.

I agree with you that online primary grades is totally inappropriate. Remember, though, in a hybrid situation, the 'work at home' days don't have to be the kid sitting on a computer. A first grader can come to school, do a new phonics and math lesson, read a book with their teacher, start a craft, set up a science experiment. They can leave at the end of the day with their bookbag filled with a phonics activity, a math sheet + set of manipulatives, a set of picture cards showing the plot of the story they read in class to sort and glue in order, their craft to finish plus the glue/crayons to finish it, 3-4 little books to read, and a handwriting worksheet. So the following day, when they stay home from school so the other half of the class can come, they open up their bookbag and have a list of 6-7 hands-on, tech-free things to do. And maybe their teacher has also set up one of those cute Bitmoji classrooms where the kid can spend a hour or so clicking on different links and using online games, but the majority of their day can still be spent offline.
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hybrid model
Old 05-24-2020, 10:18 AM
 
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I understand what a hybrid model is and how it works. I am on our reopening committee. I made the suggestion that Pre-K through 1st grade get more in person time, but based on admin responses, I don't think this will happen. Decisions seem to be made based on a high school student, and the expectations trickle down through the grade levels. I am hoping for at least a hybrid model because it will be better than full distance learning.

However, a hybrid model still requires an adult to take responsibility as a facilitator of learning for that child. Someone needs to be present and ready to guide students through the activities. A kinder kid is not going to get out their learning materials and get started on assignments/projects independently. If kinder kids are being shuffled between daycare, neighbors, grandparents, older siblings, etc., there is not always going to be someone to guide the kids through activities. That's what we have found is happening now with distance learning. Kids are being shuffled around, and aren't accessing learning in any way. For those kids who have a stable home situation, distance learning is possible.

But unfortunately, most of our students don't have this type of home. I understand that we may have to do full distance learning or a hybrid model due to safety. I just hope the expectations of what is typically expected of a kindergarten student in our district are modified. Our students are expected to be reading on a level D and writing a simple paragraph by the end of kindergarten. That's not going to happen for a lot of our kids with a distance learning or hybrid situation. The gaps will be huge going forward.
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Old 05-24-2020, 11:50 AM
 
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They've come up with different options but my kid's district people have hinted at a hybrid type model....
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Think Positive about Fall School
Old 05-24-2020, 12:15 PM
 
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Hopefully school starts for students and staff in the fall and not distance learning. Time will tell.
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Old 05-24-2020, 07:29 PM
 
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My daughter's district is focused on figuring out a hybrid model. Awesome except that I work for a different district. I really don't want to struggle to get her going with her assignments independently while I'm trying to teach. Again. It didn't work well the last time.
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Old 05-24-2020, 09:05 PM
 
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I think some sort of hybrid is most likely but it probably won't be announced till midsummer.
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Old 05-25-2020, 07:53 AM
 
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I posted above already, but re: hybrid and excuse me if someone said this already. I didn't read all the posts yet, but what if this schedule was done?

- In-person school on T, W, and maybe Th

- Stayed home for distance learning on M and F (and maybe Th if they decided not to commute on Thursdays)


Then everyone's not going back to school full-force M-F to see how things go first and to not have the same, old, same old with the new CDC guidelines all 5 days a week either.
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Old 05-25-2020, 10:27 AM
 
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Would everyone come to school on T, W, Th?

The goal of hybrid school is to have less students in the building at once so they have room to physically distance themselves. If everyone is coming to school at the same time, going 3 days instead of 5 won't really make much of a difference. But I may be misunderstanding what you're saying.
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Old 05-25-2020, 11:06 AM
 
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DRV- I’m with you on everything you said in your last post. Even now, being at a Title I school I only have about 30% of my kids who have access to a computer. Elementary students aren’t 1:1 with devices in my district so we didn’t have any to send home. I also have kids who are at daycare or with grandparents so parents can work. Additionally, over 70% of the population at my school either has parents who speak no English or parents who never completed school. We have many parents who are illiterate.

The hybrid model sounds good in theory (given it’s not double the work) especially for middle/high school. But, for elementary school.... I don’t see how it works especially if you factor in childcare issues.
I teach third grade and it would still be really difficult.

Our reopening committee has been discussing all available options.
If we had to follow CDC guidelines, elementary rooms could only hold 10 people at a time (including the tracker) and buses could only transport 12 students at a time. No school district has the money to make that work.

We have early release every Wednesday so hybrid would probably be M/T and Th/Fri with Wednesday for teachers to plan or it would be half days. Either way you’d be planning content for two learning platforms (in person and digital) which is a hell of a lot of work as schools are not set up this way.
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Old 05-25-2020, 12:02 PM
 
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I think at some point we (teachers, schools, districts, our country) are going to have to decide what the main function of school is for the next 12-18 months.

Is the main function to provide for kids' safety and basic needs (childcare, food, equal access to technology, the basics of education)? Or is it to provide a full, high quality education? I don't think we have space, staff, or money to do both.

If our main goal is meeting everyone's basic needs, that probably looks like the majority of kids 10 yrs and up doing full time virtual learning, plus any kid aged 4-9 whose parent wants them at home. Maybe some very basic "come-every-other-Tuesday-for-a-check-in" set-up and food delivery like many districts are currently doing. But all the buses, buildings, and the majority of the staff being used to safely spread out and house kids ages 4-9 and other students who cannot reasonably work online (special education, hands-on high school career classes like welding, newcomer ESL students). It means that in my school with two 7th grade ELA teachers, I am reallocated to take on half of a 3rd grade class and follow the plans their teacher has set, while the other 7th grade ELA teacher runs the virtual learning for his and my students. It means not even considering the idea of sports, clubs, arts, or extras. Basic education, needs met. Minimize the trauma if at all possible, keep some basic skills up, and we'll figure the rest out on the other side.

If our main goal is providing a high quality education to all students, then it probably looks like a hybrid model. Which yes, means lots of families will struggle with childcare and teachers will be exposed to more students. And that our neediest kids won't get daily help and that kindergartners will have to spend 3 days working at home.

We won't have enough to do it all. The question will be which of the two bad options are we more okay with.
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Old 05-25-2020, 12:57 PM
 
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Excellent point, Southernfried. I have been saying for the last few years that schools have taken on too much. It simply isn't effective to have them providing all three meals, clothing and shoes, backpacks, free before/after school care. Some of these services are going to have to be moved out of schools. Subsidized daycare and broader food assistance programs. Schools need to be able to focus on education. It was already a problem before the pandemic but it has really come to light for those outside education. We all want to help students and families but it has to be done appropriately because we simply do not have the resources, people, or facilities to provide everything.
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