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We should totally not be worried at all about going back to school

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We should totally not be worried at all about going back to school
Old 07-08-2020, 07:57 PM
  #1

...according to my husband.

His first reason is that so many parents will choose to do virtual learning so we will have really small class sizes at school.

His other reason...going to school is pretty much the same as going to the grocery store.

Whew! I feel so much better now!


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Old 07-08-2020, 08:26 PM
  #2

Sounds like he needs to spend a day in your classroom!

We haven't asked our parents to decide yet, but in a reopening meeting this week admin said that a nearby district has, and out of 9,000 students 239 selected online learning. Yep, those remaining class sizes will be super small...
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Old 07-08-2020, 08:43 PM
  #3

My husband thinks the same thing 🙄
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Working class needs to work
Old 07-08-2020, 09:02 PM
  #4

I suppose it would depend on the community your school serves. If there can be someone home to supervise children doing the virtual learning, then maybe there will be less students in class (if they have a choice.)

Unfortunately, in a working-class community, parents need to work, so even if they would prefer that their children do distance learning, they wouldn't have anyone to stay home with them.
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Old 07-08-2020, 09:51 PM
  #5

My district for my own kids said only credit recovery is the online option. Not a very good alternative and our numbers are super bad, close to LA.


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Old 07-08-2020, 09:53 PM
  #6

Fortunately my DH is also a teacher, so he understands my concerns. His staff is currently having an online Q&A session, and his head is about to explode because there are so few answers.
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Old 07-09-2020, 05:04 AM
  #7

My DS said that teaching in person and online at the same time was no different than teaching in a multi grade classroom. That’s what he had in elementary school. It didn’t look like it would be hard to teach. He has worked through this mess, in an office, by himself.
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Old 07-09-2020, 05:29 AM
  #8

The virus is still very new and the data on young people and children is somewhat emergent. The kids left school in early March so they have been somewhat protected. Now the numbers will change because our government leaders have not been there to help parents keep their children at home. Adults who squawked about wearing a mask have contributed to the spread of the virus. This is an impending disaster for young people and all school employees.I am especially concerned about the low income areas where people are forced to send their children to filthy classroom petri dishes in order to go to their jobs. A classic example of the inequities in America.
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Ha!
Old 07-09-2020, 06:52 AM
  #9

Be sure to remind him of this conversation when your little one goes to school and shares more than artwork!
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Old 07-09-2020, 07:23 AM
  #10

This is from Facebook, so no idea who the actual author is, but it sounds sensible to me. [QUOTE]From a Covid-19 doctor at Duke regarding SCHOOL REOPENING. She makes several points that people often don’t mention, but none more striking to me than the point on morbidity vs mortality.
—————
There has been much discussion and debate about what school will look like next year. Today, Wake county announced that they will have kids in a rotation of 1 week in person/ 2 weeks remote. I expect Chapel hill will shortly follow suit,
Or have some similar hybrid plan. I keep getting asked this question repeatedly from friends — “well, you are a COVID Doctor. What do YOU think about sending your kids back to school”. My answer is my own, deeply personal, and not reflective of my employer. And I recognize and appreciate that many of my colleagues in the same position as me have different views. BUT. Since so many keep asking me, here is my answer, as both a parent and a frontline covid doctor. Do with it as you choose:

My family is electing to remote school next year. The reasons for this are multi-factorial:

-this disease scares the #### out of me. After 4 months caring for covid patients, we certainly know a lot more. But a lot of it isn’t reassuring. Covid is now known to cause lung, heart, kidney, brain, and clotting system complications. And that’s just what we know about the immediate effects. We have no idea — NONE — what the longer term effects might be. I am not willling to risk the health and vitality of my kids to find out what those long term side effects might be.

-morbidity vs mortality. I’ve talked about this in prior posts. Yes, very few children actually die of covid. BUT many young people still get very very sick. Intubated. Put on ecmo. Pediatric multisystem inflammatory syndrome. Kawasaki-like illness with coronary artery aneurysms. These are serious issues with long term effects. Just because covid doesnt kill you; it doesn’t mean you will ever be quite the same either.

-the teachers and staff. My god, how can we ask this of them? After cautiously sheltering in place for months, we are now asking them to basically jump into the lions den and interact with hundreds of children with thousands of household contacts. The more exposure you have, the more risk you have. Trust me, we WILL see teachers and bus drivers and cafeteria workers and other staff — and their family members— who get sick and die.

-I want to continue having my parents involved in my kids life. If we strictly isolate, I feel safe doing so. But If the kids go back to school and interact with dozens of kids from dozens of homes, the risk to my parents increases exponentially.

-I do strongly believe that since we CAN keep our kids home without significant detrimental effects, we SHOULD. There are so, so many people in our community whose lives and careers and finances will be devastated by having to do remote learning. We will not be. We can do so for a year without undue harm to my kids or our careers or our finances. I choose to keep my kids home so that families who absolutely cannot do so have just a little bit more safety at school.

I acknowledge that we are EXTREMELY privileged for me to only work part-time clinically and am able to do my non-clinical work remotely and help home school. And my parents live here and are willing and fully engaged to help us home school during the weeks I absolutely have to be in the hospital.

This seems like a ####### nightmare for any family with a single parent, two working parents who cannot work from home, families with out extended family support, and families with ESL, kids with IEPs, exceptional children, etc etc.

I have zero answers as to how to make it better. Zero. I don’t want kids falling behind disproportionally because their parents cannot afford to home school or hire tutors. I also don’t want to see kids sick from covid and dead teachers.

Any plan than is less than 100% not in-person seems doomed to only worsen and exacerbate the achievement gap between the haves/have nots.

But — Any plan that involves more in person time also puts kids and teachers more at risk. And these teachers quite frankly do not get paid enough to risk their and their families lives.

I have no answer. It is impossible./]QUOTE]


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Sounds like here
Old 07-09-2020, 07:32 AM
  #11

Ughh....

We just got an email from our superintendent saying that we're (teachers) going back Aug. 3 with kids coming back Aug. 10 and we have to honor what our contract says. It also pretty much said that we have to use our sick days if we get sick with it (we get 10). He's having a "webinar" next week for staff.

We're supposedly doing the one group comes Monday and Tuesday, and one comes Thursday and Friday.

He still hasn't told parents anything yet.

I'm honestly scared. While I've been careful with this virus, I've never really felt "scared" until the thought of school starting back up and me being exposed to so many people (either directly or indirectly). I know we can't live in fear forever, but our numbers are going up instead of down due to vacations (or so I assume).
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Old 07-09-2020, 11:57 AM
  #12

i'm sorry to hear that. my DH just told me he was worried about me going back. ughhhhh..... trying to not think about it until it is time.
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foster children, special ed, transiency,
Old 07-09-2020, 01:25 PM
  #13

I can't imagine what will happen to the 35% of the population in our district that are in foster care or group home residents. Will foster parents even be willing to keep children temporarily if they are unable to go to school or are learning on a rotational schedule. The moderate to severe students will require the parents time and attention at home so what will happen to their siblings? My transiency rate this year was exactly 50 % from beginning of the year through March 13. I anticipated that I would have received at least 5-6 more students in my Kinder class if we would have gone through May. Those hypothetical bodies most likely never signed up for any online school and probably couldn't even hold a pencil. That was the case for me this year as students entered Kinder all the way to March. We will have far more 5-6 year olds not enrolling in school than what is anticipated.

Also the robust schedules that I have seen being implemented on line are for students that not only have the environment of learning in their home but the emotional and academic support to make that even happen. I had 3 students that were homeless too. It is now getting closer and closer to confronting this situation. I still believe that parents need to be involved in the decision making process. . . .not just for show either but as valuable participants. Choice is really important .
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Old 07-09-2020, 01:26 PM
  #14

My 18 year old DS has decided that if I have to go back to in person teaching I will be quarantined in my bedroom (bathroom is attached) when I am home. DH has agreed with him. Of course that means DH won't be allowed in and will have to find somewhere else to sleep and for all his clothes.

I'm torn about going back. I teach self-contained special ed and it did not go well this past spring. My students really need in-person, but I also don't want them, my paras, or me to catch this virus.

Right now the plan for DH is to sleep in my 18 year old DDs loft bed since she is supposed to be going away to college. I'll believe it when she's actually moved in. I think most of her classes will be online. We would have her stay home and do community college like her twin brother, but she would lose all her merit aid, which is a substantial amount.
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Sounds like my husband
Old 07-09-2020, 02:30 PM
  #15

He has had to work this entire time, so he thinks it should be business as usual for everyone. He thinks we should probably wear masks, but admits that is not certain.
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Old 07-10-2020, 04:17 PM
  #16

Our state is one the biggest hot spots in the nation and our idiotic governor is even discouraging online learning! They want everyone back in the classroom. Our union is having a fit and many parents are up in arms. We have over 11,000 cases today and I can't even tell you how many times we have already reported that many! Crazy!

Have your husband spend a day in school with you !

Nancy
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Umm
Old 07-10-2020, 05:03 PM
  #17

Quote:
His other reason...going to school is pretty much the same as going to the grocery store
I’m trying to remember the last time I went grocery shopping 5 days in a row for 8hrs each day.
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