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Calculating Square Footage
Old 07-26-2020, 08:02 AM
 
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I was trying to figure out the maximum number of students per room if my school were to go with the CDC guidelines of 6 feet distance. Doesn't that mean 36 square feet per person, or am I missing something? Is there a formula out there somewhere?

Plus, I realize it depends on what else is in the room.


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It would not
Old 07-26-2020, 08:11 AM
 
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be true of every room and situation. For example, the kids on the ends or sides would not need a true 36 sq ft as there is no reason for clearance in the directions where there are no other children.

Plus, I thought I read somewhere that they were reducing that number to 3 ft for students? That may be incorrect or just one state or one district.
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Old 07-26-2020, 08:13 AM
 
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I think not. If there is 6 feet between two people, they don’t each have 6 feet. They each have 3. In this case, I think drawing a diagram might be an easier way to figure it out!
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Here's the math
Old 07-26-2020, 12:17 PM
 
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Think of it a circles with a radius of 3 feet. Each child is in the center of a circle with 3 feet around in every direction. The 3 feet from child A to the edge of that circle plus the 3 feet from child B to the edge of that circle equals the 6 foot distance.

To figure out the area required for each child use the area formula for a circle which is pi r squared. So about 3.14 x 3 x 3 = about 28.3 square feet per student.

So if you want to find the maximum number of students that could be in the room, start by finding the area of the room. Most are rectangular so area equals length times width.

Take the area of the room and divide by 28.3 to find the maximum number of occupants.
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Old 07-26-2020, 12:31 PM
 
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My district has said “3-6 feet when feasible.”

If we’re using 6 feet, I can fit 6 desks in my room.
If it is 3 feet I could do 10 (has to do with the layout of the actual room).

Yet, we are going back face to face full-time with “class sizes aligned to prior years” for K-3 that means 18 and it just gets larger as you go up in grade level. The special teachers rooms are somewhat larger (not by much) and they have upwards of 50+ kids in their rooms as once....

(We are Title I and as of now only about 20% of our almost 800 students have chosen digital learning)


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Old 07-26-2020, 04:32 PM
 
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There are quite a few online calculators that will tell you how many you can fit. My problem was that my admin did that and told me I can fit 16 kids. However, one kid would need to be in the very back corner where they couldn't see the tv or white board at all, another kid would be underneath the tv and right in front of the white board, and it didn't include a place for me.
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Old 07-26-2020, 05:23 PM
 
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Yes, there is a big difference between having enough square feet and being able to arrange seating in a way that permits effective teaching.

What I would suggest is using q piece of graph paper to draw your room to scale. Put in anything that can't be moved like door, windows, electrical outlets, perhaps a smart board. Cut out circles to scale with 3 foot radius and start playing with arranging them.

Since a student doesn't need a 3 foot buffer between them and the wall, you could fold the circle, not quite in half unless you have very skinny students.

And yes, doors need to open and everyone must be able to see. I don't remember learning about this aspect of classroom management back in college.
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Old 07-27-2020, 06:09 AM
 
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My district is removing all unnecessary fixtures out of the classrooms and they are replacing tables with desks, when possible, to maximize space. We have some teachers who have things like sofas in their classrooms and they have been instructed to take them home. The district has a team who is responsible for determining the number of students per room.
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Thanks!
Old 07-27-2020, 06:20 AM
 
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Quote:
To figure out the area required for each child use the area formula for a circle which is pi r squared. So about 3.14 x 3 x 3 = about 28.3 square feet per student.
That makes a lot more sense. I'm not sure how some of those kids would even be able to see the IWB!
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I did this.
Old 07-27-2020, 06:32 AM
 
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Quote:
What I would suggest is using q piece of graph paper to draw your room to scale. Put in anything that can't be moved like door, windows, electrical outlets, perhaps a smart board. Cut out circles to scale with 3 foot radius and start playing with arranging them.
I can fit 10 in my room.


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