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SpedLearn SpedLearn is offline
 
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Frustrated with ED/BD
Old 10-10-2018, 06:04 PM
 
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I can't deal with this population. Getting these kids to sit through a 5 minute task is like pulling teeth, no matter how fun and engaging it is. They only respond to candy or food and throw fits over writing a simple 3 word sentence (in 5th grade???). Not to mention setting each other off every 10 minutes.

We tried to watch a science clip, with an experiment on mentos and soda. Kids love youtube don't they? 30 seconds into it, "He keeps looking at me!" "When is this over??" I mean NO CONCEPT OF SITTING THROUGH A LESSON!

Another thing....anything academic they resist. If it involves adding a simple equation or writing down an answer, no matter how much one on one help I give, its time to throw ourselves on the floor and cry, or run out of the room. Are you kidding me??? Is this normal for this population??

I feel like scrapping my efforts to find fun engaging activities and just give out worksheets. Whether its a fun lab involving M&Ms or a boring reading passage about Isaac Newton....they'll tear it up anyways! Whats the point???


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Haley23 Haley23 is offline
 
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Old 10-11-2018, 06:55 PM
 
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Yes, that behavior is very typical for that placement. I'm truly not trying to be snarky, but I'm wondering what you thought it would be like? The kids are put into that placement for a reason. In most places, it's extremely difficult to get into a self-contained behavior placement, so only the absolutely most severe get sent, and then you have them all in a room setting each other off. I've always said there is no amount of money in the world that would entice me to work in that placement!

It sounds like you are putting a lot of effort into making things fun, and I'm sorry that's not appreciated. I will say that in my setting I've found that behavior kids actually respond best to structure, routine, and predictability. They actually may do better with the "boring" activities if you set up a structure and a very predictable routine. The predictability makes them feel safe.

I have several kids with severe behaviors every year, and over the years I've had to get less "fun" and more structured. My first couple of years, I'd plan "fun" things and found they didn't go well. I used to do holiday themed things. For example, around Halloween the kids would make a monster out of craft supplies and then write about it. My kids were always the worst on these days because of the unpredictability. I find that for the most part, they are truly most engaged when they are doing something I might consider "boring" but is something they can feel successful at.
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BD/ED kiddos
Old 10-12-2018, 12:52 PM
 
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I love teaching EB/D kiddos, they are definitely a challenge. Here's what I do.
1. I work really hard at establishing a relationship with them, so I can have a conversation with them about something other than school. Academics may need to take a back seat for a couple of weeks. Play some games. UNO is a great one. When I had Level 4 EBD kids, we had a sit down session every morning to see what people had to say. One boy was always clowning around so I asked him to come up with jokes for the class. He did and I didn't have any more trouble with him disrupting class. Academics is not the most important thing.
2. Remember they are emotionally and behaviorally challenged...why?? trauma, lack of attention, foster home, etc.
3. The most important thing to them is finding someone who cares, the least important thing to them is learning.
4. They want to know that they matter, that they are heard
5. Is the work too difficult? What do assessments say about their reading and math levels?

It sounds like you have some great lessons, my guess is that they are trying to get your attention, so give them positive attention for even the smallest thing they do right. Say things like, " I like how Johnny worte 2 words by himself. Fantastic"

I had a professor in college that said to me, "EBD kids are the hardest because they look normal. If we could just put them in wheelchairs, then everyone would realize that they have a disability."

So ask yourself, "Can I love these kids?" I have found that EB/D kids seem to have an innate ability to know if you like them or not.

Good luck. You can do this!!
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EBD students
Old 10-13-2018, 07:43 AM
 
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Previous posters both gave some excellent input.
Quote:
I might consider "boring" but is something they can feel successful at.
and
Quote:
I have found that EB/D kids seem to have an innate ability to know if you like them or not.
Aside from past abuse and/or trauma, some of these students act out because they are scared of not being successful. Imagine being called on again and again to read in front of the class just to be laughed at. What I do is use a grade-level standard and scaffold down to their level, even if that means a 9th grader doing 2nd grade work.
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Old 10-27-2018, 06:08 AM
 
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I've been teaching ED/BD for 10 years.

Just stop. Don't expect that to behave because they're having fun. Don't expect them to behave because you're fun. Don't expect them to behave because the material is fun.

They need routine, discipline and understanding cause and effect. Even include peer pressure. At the end of every class/day have a reward earned if students reach a certain amount of points/tokens..etc. These types of students need extra incentives, the other stuff didn't work in the past. Identify the harmful behaviors in your class. Tell students what is and is not acceptable. Model good behavior. Reward at end of class if students meet expectations. If it's really bad, they need immediate rewards, then over time you can fade back.

I am the fun teacher. This school year my class got too active. So I shut everything down. We got a KWL chart, we had a reading/text book, we answered the questions. Like clockwork. They began to understand their behavior decides whether we can play jeopardy, card games, chess...etc. You need them to "get it."


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Breathe deeply
Old 10-28-2018, 04:11 AM
 
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Dear Frustrated,
The situation described in your post is indeed frustrating.
If you have access to a Social Emotional expert, then please give them a call.
It would seem instant gratification runs rampant nowadays, building up self control can be difficult at best.
We are not going to change the rules outside of the classroom but we can adjust the responsibilities in the classroom.
You may need to speak with your curriculum specialist and behavioral specialist to create a new approach for your population.
I wish you success and rewards for your hard work.
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