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It Feels Like a Prison
Old 09-07-2019, 10:11 AM
 
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I am feeling increasingly angry over admin's requirements for the hallway. They are demanding that students always been in an assigned line order, walk on lines painted down the hall, and even have their hands behind their backs. Not only do they have to be silent, but they have to have their cheeks puffed out with a "bubble" in their mouth. If one student isn't perfect they send the entire class back to start over.
I understand having expectations for a quiet orderly line. This is so over the top, though!
What are other schools like? How do your students behave in the hallways?
(This is obviously elementary)


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Old 09-07-2019, 11:12 AM
 
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That's not unreasonable. Kids should walk in an silent, orderly fashion in the hall. They don't get to disrupt other classes. I'm with admin on this one.
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Old 09-07-2019, 11:31 AM
 
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Please tell me you're kidding!

In the meantime to make it more palatable to your little ones I have 2 suggestions, if you're allowed to use positive reinforcement.

One is a FREEBIE from TPT, "Are You the Lucky Duck?" Directions are included.

If the class is a "Perfect 10" they earn a reward. That means " 1 straight line, 0 talking. "

For either one the reward can be a class DOJO point, a marble in a jar, or whatever system you're allowed to use. If using the Lucky Duck, that child gives the class the reward. You, of course, praise the Lucky Duck for being such a good team player.

When a predetermined number is reached, a class celebration is earned.

I hope this is helpful. I just so sorry you and your children have to deal with such foolishness.
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Old 09-07-2019, 11:31 AM
 
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We are not quite like yours- the visible "bubble" and hands behind their backs is a bit much, IMO. But our hallways used to be out of control and when our current admin came in, they set very strict expectations that everyone is to follow. They did a ton of modeling and practicing and such and everyone uses the same language. Kids do have a line up order, voice level 0, hands by your sides, eyes forward, "walk with a purpose."

I no longer have to make sure my door is shut all day long due to hallway noise, and it's much easier to get my own students to walk correctly in a line now that it's an expectation with any teacher they see. I also sometimes progress monitor students in the hallway, and it's 100x easier now that there aren't distractions. We also have some specialists who work with kids at tables in the hallway (don't get me started on how unfair that is, but I digress) and it's much less distracting to their students.
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Sorry...
Old 09-07-2019, 11:32 AM
 
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I'm all for silence in the hallway and actually enforcing it. I'm also for using different ways or strategies to help make that happen. However, I agree, what you are talking about is excessive, to me the cheeks puffed out goes too far. I think those are good strategies to teach students If they are struggling to be quiet in the hall, but to make it a requirement is too much in my opinion.

I like that proper hallway behavior is enforced, too, but having the entire class start over is eventually going to back fire in my opinion. Kids will be missing out on so much instruction time and if they don't want to sit in class doing work, then why not break hallway expectations repeatedly so they just have to go back? I'm all for holding them accountable for hallway behavior, but don't think having the whole class go back and do it again until it is done right is effective.

My only advice to you is that my guess parents will complain. I can't see parents being happy about forcing kids to walk with their cheeks puffed out.


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Old 09-07-2019, 11:44 AM
 
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Kids will be missing out on so much instruction time and if they don't want to sit in class doing work, then why not break hallway expectations repeatedly so they just have to go back? I'm all for holding them accountable for hallway behavior, but don't think having the whole class go back and do it again until it is done right is effective.
I've always thought this exact same thing. Pretty much every admin or behavior person/guru etc. has said if they don't do it right, make them practice again, and I've never understood that. I could see this being effective ONLY if it is done during a preferred activity time (i.e. we'll practice at recess).

If I don't like/am not good at reading, and I know I can delay starting the reading lesson by simply saying two words to the person behind me, why on earth wouldn't I just keep doing that? I can maybe see if it's the very beginning of the year and you're truly teaching kids the procedures and expectations, then "practicing" might work. But it's even one month in, I'm not buying for 2 seconds that they "don't know how" to do the hallway expectations.
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Old 09-07-2019, 01:20 PM
 
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I think that requiring them to walk on lines and be quiet is totally reasonable.


Requiring them to be in a line order, have their hands behind their back and their cheeks puffed out is ridiculous. Pure micromanagement. If a teacher wants to require a line order, great. But telling everyone they must? Your admin must not have enough to do.
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Old 09-07-2019, 02:35 PM
 
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The only way I can puff my cheeks out like that feels uncomfortably like holding my breath! If my DS's school had done that, I think I would have finally caved into home schooling.
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Old 09-07-2019, 02:47 PM
 
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I have noticed our younger kids "putting bubbles in their mouths," which is weird, but works for them. I would never have told my 3rd graders to do that.

We work hard on being quiet in the hallway, but that is extreme.
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Old 09-07-2019, 02:47 PM
 
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I work in a school with a high population of children of color -- and no way would any administrator allow this. It would be considered part of the school to prison pipeline. Prisons have lines painted on the floor and make you walk with your hands behind your back.

Nope. I would not enforce that at all.

But I have made kids practice walking safely down the hall -- always at recess time. Usually only takes once, then they get it. We don't allow running, yelling, tackling, etc. But as long as they walk quietly and safely down the hall, they don't necessarily have to be in a line.


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Way too extreme to me...
Old 09-07-2019, 03:16 PM
 
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I never even heard of a bubble mouth. Assigned order is ridiculous too. My kids can be pulled anytime by a number of pple. ( OT, PT, Speech, Sped, Title) There goes that system out the window.
I think kids should be quiet in the hall so they do not disturb other classes. If they have issues w/ keeping their hands to themselves, then they need to put their hands behind their backs or in their pockets.
If certain kids have issues in line, they should go back and walk, but not the ones who did not do anything!
Years ago, it was supposed to be silent in the halls. The P we have now gives them high 5's and chats w/ them. So..I no longer bother w/ silence.
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Old 09-07-2019, 05:48 PM
 
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You are describing abuse! Utter nonsense. Gosh.
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Old 09-07-2019, 05:58 PM
 
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That is insane walking with a bubble in their mouths! I can understand the quiet halls but bubbles seems abusive to me.
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As bad as the situation sounds...
Old 09-07-2019, 09:45 PM
 
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I always take the report of extreme actions made by a school, teacher, or administrator, with a grain of salt when the op is a guest poster.
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Grain of salt
Old 09-07-2019, 10:19 PM
 
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Rkhnd said it perfectly. The same idea occurred to me.
If the situation truly exists, I wonder if the school is a regular public school. I'm guessing possibly private or a charter that emphasizes extreme discipline.
As long as students are reasonably quiet, I see absolutely no reason to force them to walk in an artificially prescribed manner.
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Old 09-08-2019, 03:33 AM
 
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Rkhnd, totally agree. We have single file silent lines in our halls, but not the bubble, hand, painted line, assigned spot thing. Not necessary. Classes need to not be disrupted by noisy kids in the hall all day.
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Old 09-08-2019, 04:16 AM
 
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We have some teachers at my school who allow their students to walk however they want down the hallway, they are in a “line” but barely. It makes it even more difficult to get my class to walk correctly when other classes are all over the place.

We do have some teachers who require bubble in the mouth, and make them put a 0 in the air with one of their hands and the other behind their back. It’s overkill and I don’t like seeing it.
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Old 09-08-2019, 04:31 AM
 
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I knew as soon as I signed out some of you would get all twisted about a guest post. I signed out because I'm paranoid someone from my school will see it and it will get back to my admin.
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Old 09-08-2019, 09:10 AM
 
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I think your building sounds horrible. We encourage walking in line order, just because it eliminates all the "he cut/she cut" nonsense. No lines on our floors, way too many students for that. Sometimes we have 3-4 classes passing at a time so orderly lines are essential and safer. The only ones who walk with the bubble/hands in back are the kinders. Anyone older would think it ridiculous. No way would we have time to send the entire class back to redo. What a time waster and how discourteous to the special area class you're going to. As others have said, whomever doesn't like xyz special area class, lets just cut up and screw around so we just keep redoing our lines. We encourage quietness, and really they don't need to talk while going somewhere but they do. I just want them to respect other classrooms and student's learning.
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Definitely over the top...
Old 09-08-2019, 11:13 AM
 
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I feel very sorry for the students who are capable of walking quietly in the hallways without such a system. I would rather see an administrator reward a good class maybe with extra recess or homework passes than punishing a whole class even if one student isn't perfect. Being sent back means students could be late to their special and the specials teachers have minutes shaved off of their lessons. Also if the destination is a special, that is your prep. time you are losing going back to the classroom. I have also had students in the past who would have broken the rules just because they thought they could. I have occasionally sent my class back if they were exceptionally noisy but not on a regular basis.
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Walking in a line
Old 09-08-2019, 12:59 PM
 
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I would really hate that. One thing that occurs to me is that when you walk with your hands behind your back it's harder to catch yourself when you trip and fall. That makes it a safety issue in my opinion. Beyond that, those expectations sound demeaning to the children. It sends a message that we don't believe that they can control themselves and so we must take extreme measures to exert control.
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My opinion
Old 09-08-2019, 02:20 PM
 
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That's borderline abuse! It makes me sick to my stomach. I'm not sure what you can do about it, but let's hope one or more of the children share it with their parents. Maybe complaints from home will make the admin re-examine their ridiculous policy.
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Quiet but happy
Old 09-08-2019, 02:29 PM
 
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I didn’t feel like a prison guard and many of my fellow teachers used walk in a line, hands by my side, etc. Some days there were 5 or more classes going down the hallway. It was very necessary.

I used to explain to my kindergarten students how important it was to walk down the hall to go to art or to the gym. We discussed strategies on how to do it. We came up with hands by my side, hands behind my back, etc. We also discussed how having a “bubble” doesn’t mean having your cheeks puffed out. We followed the green tiles down the hall. When I would see many of my students doing a strategy, I would praise them for thinking. We also had a little rhyme to say as we would start our walk down the hallway. “I’m very quiet as can be. I’m standing straight and tall.”

After first nine weeks or whenever the majority of the class knew the rules for the hall, we would use some descriptive vocabulary words to walk/tiptoe/waddle down the hall. Of course, we did this closer to our class as we did not want to disturb other classes.
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Old 09-10-2019, 11:05 AM
 
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I think they should walk in line without talking. I don't understand the hands behind back and bubble. Line order sometimes is needed if you have a really chatty class. I always had my class walk quietly. I really got annoyed with noisy classes going by my room. I guess I'm old school.
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Hallways
Old 09-10-2019, 09:41 PM
 
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I've never worked in a school that had hallways (schools aren't really built like that in Australia). But, when my class is walking past another room, we duck down and pretend to be 'ninjas' so we don't disturb them. I encourage them to use soft feet + soft voices when we move around the school.

I think the bubble thing makes sense, especially in an enclosed school. The rest does seem a bit extreme.... but as I said, I've never worked in a school with hallways + I'm guessing sound does echo and carry more.
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Old 09-14-2019, 09:43 AM
 
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I would really hate that. One thing that occurs to me is that when you walk with your hands behind your back it's harder to catch yourself when you trip and fall. That makes it a safety issue in my opinion. Beyond that, those expectations sound demeaning to the children. It sends a message that we don't believe that they can control themselves and so we must take extreme measures to exert control.
I agree with this. I've worked with teachers who did the bubbles and duck tails and I always thought it was asking for someone to fall on their faces.

The bubbles I actually like, but I was teaching preschool at the time. The first time we put a bubble in, we looked like we had bubbles in. After that, if a child was talking in the hall, I would ask, "Oh! Do you have your bubble in?" They would puff out for a second, but it was really just a reminder to stay quiet.

I think it's all in how it's used. I can't see a principal requiring a bubble. It's fine to me to use the bubble as a reminder to stay quiet in the hallway, depending on the grade.
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