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Emptypeach Emptypeach is offline
 
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Dog Lovers help PART 2
Old 01-21-2021, 09:22 PM
  #1

Thank you for all that responded to the post about my rescue that bites. I took everyones suggestions and told the rescue that I have to get him out of my home. He's too powerful for me. Here's the response:

ím very sad to hear this!! Russel deserves a chance and he needs you to get him to a point where we can rehome him. I talked to a behaviorist today and I now Katie mentioned some of the things to you. Iím not opposed to helping with a board and train but you have to help him too. He is crying out for help from you and is craving boundaries. He has already been failed in his life and we donít want to fail him again. I know sometimes it can feel overwhelming but with some minor changes and consistency he can get back to the boy you adopted. When you get a second send me some pictures of him and I will post for a foster and see what happens


what should I do now? Hope this all makes sense it's the middle of the night and I am shaky.
THANKS!


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Dangerous Dog Part 2
Old 01-21-2021, 09:40 PM
  #2

Unless there is something you are leaving out, Russell has already had his second chance. He is a dog with a bite history that has caused people to get stitches. He has escalated to the "unprovoked" attack on the other dog. He will end up hurting someone or their pet. The rescue does not want him returned because it's bad for their statistics. You need to consider if you are comfortable with the idea of sending him back to the rescue that could very easily adopt him out again. If they do, it is not likely that the new owner will be given his history. It doesn't make him very adoptable, and there could very well be a tragedy. I still highly recommend that you put him to sleep, or that if you are not willing to do that or want to see if he can be rehabbed, that you immediately begin work on taking precautions for a vicious dog. I have a two dogs in my pack that require a firm and experienced hand. They would be a hot mess in the hands of an inexperienced owner or someone that lacked discipline and boundaries. However, neither one of them has ever even at their worst required anyone to get stitches. Please be very, very careful. I love dogs and wish we could save them all, but what you've described sounds like a recipe for disaster.
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Old 01-21-2021, 09:52 PM
  #3

I’m so angry for you! Obviously they are trying to guilt and manipulate you, don’t let them. Tell them in no uncertain terms you will not be able to keep this dog and if they don’t want him euthanized they need to take him back. I might also mention that since they’ve been notified he’s dangerous they could be held responsible for any injury that occurs (no idea if that’s true but I’d probably still say it )
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Stick to your decision
Old 01-21-2021, 10:02 PM
  #4

Nope. I'd suggest a very short response. No "I'm sorry". Just "I will not be caring for Russel after (and give them a very short deadline--like 5 PM Friday.) If he has not been picked up by that time, I will (call animal control? drop him at your house?). And then stick to it.
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Old 01-22-2021, 12:33 AM
  #5

I didn't respond the first time because you got some great advice. Since I'm awake at this awful hour I'll give my opinion.

NO THE DOG DOES NOT HAVE TO STAY. IF THIS PERSON WANTS TO SAVE THE DOG THEN SHE CAN COME GET HIM.

Yes, I believe in being kind and working with dogs, but this has gotten out of control and you fear for your life. Not your job to pay to fix this dog. PERIOD!

Tell her if she doesn't come by x time tomorrow, Friday, you ate taking the dog to the shelter. No more discussion.


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How dare they!
Old 01-22-2021, 02:37 AM
  #6

I am furious that they would make you feel guilty! Yes, itís sad for the dog, but some dogs are not wired correctly and will always bite. Do not let them manipulate you!!!

I agree with giving them until the end of today, and then take the dog to a shelter. If they can truly rehabilitate the dog, then itís on them. You canít, youíve been victimized by this animal, regardless if itís his ďfaultĒ or not.

Please be safe, be strong, and get that dog out of your home ASAP!
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Thank you all
Old 01-22-2021, 03:24 AM
  #7

Thank you for all your help--PT is amazing. Taking all of you words in and thinking of how to stay strong and stick to what I know is heartbreaking but the responsible choice. THANK YOU.
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Wow
Old 01-22-2021, 03:26 AM
  #8

We recused our dog in April and the shelter was adamant, in fact itís in the contract, that if we for whatever reason cannot have the dog anymore we are to return her to the shelter, zero questions asked. They were so clear in that if itís not the right fit that the dog must be returned so I am SHOCKED thatís the response. Iíd almost want to go to another shelter and ask their advice. I would reply that there is no way you can continue to home russel and give a time you will be bringing him to the shelter.

Yes dogs, especially rescues,need time and consistency but the fact is that russel just isnít a good fit for your home and you both deserve to have the right fit.

I am sorry you and russel are going through this. I would not bend and would be adamant that you cannot continue to home russel
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Old 01-22-2021, 03:55 AM
  #9

Our rescue had a clause in the contract that said that, if for any reason, we were unable to keep her, she would be brought back to the shelter and removed by them - no questions asked. Every once in awhile you see dogs back up for adoption on their page with a quick note of the fact the dog had been brought back to the shelter a second time.


This is just my thoughts based on experience:
I used to work for a family tutoring their teen daughter. They found a German Shepard pup and decided to keep it. They vetted it, were very firm wirh it, brought in a private trainer - the whole 9 yards. One day I got out of my car and was attacked unprovoked. How I didn't need stitches, i still don't know. I urged the owners to rehome him or send him to a boarding facility with GS specialty trainers instead of using the trainer they were using. This dog was getting more and more aggressive. 2 months later I got a call that they had to put the dog down. It bit a small child on the face and required the child to get multiple stitches. (I am friends with this girls family and thankfully the plastic surgeon who did her work was amazing and you can barely see the scars now.) It broke my heart to know they had to destroy the dog, but it had to be done. He attacked twice unprovoked with significant injury on the second attack.

Remove, relinquish to the shelter, or put him down. I know its hard, but too many times, once a dog gets a taste for blood, they attack again.
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Old 01-22-2021, 04:22 AM
  #10

Iíve never worked with a rescue or shelter that didnít have a ďreturn with no questions askedĒ policy. In fact, twice I had to sign a contract stating that if I could not keep the dog I would return it to them.


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Old 01-22-2021, 04:27 AM
  #11

They are using guilt and it is horrible! You have done all you can as a dog owner and the rescue is being very unprofessional and extreme.
Take care!
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Biting is serious...
Old 01-22-2021, 05:02 AM
  #12

Unfortunately, he has to go. He is not a good match for your situation. When I had to return the dog that had guarding issues, and was attacking my other dog unprovoked, my vet supported my decision, saying it was a difficult behavior to get rid of, and could escalate to other things besides food guarding.

He may be crying out for help, but you are not in the position to give it. They need to take him back, take responsibility and make the decisions that are best for this dog.
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She or he
Old 01-22-2021, 05:53 AM
  #13

Is being lazy. I am angry for you also.

Foster homes are usually supported by a kennel/ shelter.

She sounds like she thinks you got a good dog and it's your fault that you ruined him. Not true!

Reply with,

"I find your email insulting. It sounds like you wish for me to keep this dangerous dog until you can line up something. I am dropping the dog off to you today."
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Be Assertive
Old 01-22-2021, 06:09 AM
  #14

Tell them either they take him as the rescue, or you are taking him to a shelter. Their choice, but you cannot keep him. Give them a timeframe of two days to take him. If they don't, take him to the shelter. You were trying to do a good thing. They are taking advantage of you. You have another dog to worry about, as well as the people around this dog. You can end up incourt if this dog does damage to another dog, or a person, or , God forbid, a child.
This poor dog has shown you what he is capable of, believe him.
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Old 01-22-2021, 07:04 AM
  #15

I agree rescues usually want you to bring the dog back if it doesn't work out for whatever reason. They have the responsibility to take him back and evaluate him. I would be adamant that they need to take him back.
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I am so sorry!
Old 01-22-2021, 08:29 AM
  #16

My apologies for this rescue group that has decided to try and make you feel guilty and doubt your decision. I dare they! There is just no reason to treat the owners of these kind of dogs in this situation this way. I like to give them a piece of my mind.

Is there another rescue group you can consult with?

Be strong. You know the situation better than anyone else. You have made the decision with consideration to all concerned, but best for you and your family. Continue down your path.

If I were you I would not allow this rescue team to tug on my heart strings. Give them no power over you to make you feel badly. Of coarse you can still have compassion in your heart for Russ (I know your do) and hope that he gets the professional help that he needs and can turn his behavior around.
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Old 01-22-2021, 08:50 AM
  #17

They're really being jerks. My rescue gets dogs out ASAP because if they have a bite on their record we automatically have to put them down so we like to avoid that at all costs. That's how I got Aikman.

I agree with the others: Give them a choice. They can come get him or you can drop him off (either at a shelter or at someone's house, at this point you don't care).

I've never heard of ANY rescue being so unresponsive. I'd also write a YELP review about them.

(HUGS) to you and your family for having to deal with this.
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The same thing happened to my friebd
Old 01-22-2021, 09:16 AM
  #18

I rent from a really good friend who fostered-to-adopt a dog two years ago. They didnít tell my friend that she was aggressive, just ďfearful.Ē
She was a sweetie toward people and very smart but also very aggressive toward other dogs and extremely powerful. She almost broke through a privacy fence in the yard to get to the neighborís Golden.
My friend found out that she was part Dutch Shepherd which is a breed designed for police and military work. She talked with a trainer who specialized in that breed and he said training could help but basically she would never get on with other dogs and small children were iffy.
The rescue said you could return the dog if it didnít work out, especially since this was supposed to be a ďfoster.Ē However, when my friend tried, they would not return her calls and when she finally did get through shamed her for her lack of training and love for the dog so fiercely that she ended the call in tears. After another week of trying and eventually giving an ultimatum (you take the dog or sheís going to the humane society) they finally took her back.
I am so sorry this is happening to you! Keep pushing! It was the right choice for my friend and it sounds like it is for you too!
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Old 01-22-2021, 02:25 PM
  #19

I'm with the others who say they are furious for you. No legit, responsible rescue I know would respond that way.

I think you need to lay it all out for them - the dog is dangerous to my family, I do not have the ability to provide what he needs, you need to take him or I will need to do what is right for me, whether that is a shelter or euthanasia.

However, I do think that you can't responsibly take him to a shelter, knowing his bite history. If you reveal the history, it's possible a particularly strapped-for-resources shelter will euthanize him rather than spend the resources to rehab him.

So honestly, if it is as bad as it sounds, unless you can find another rescue willing to take him on with a full disclosure of his behavior, I wouldn't fault you at all for finding a loving, calm way to euthanize him yourself. There are groups that come to your home so that you can have a good day with him and he can just go to sleep peacefully rather than suffer the stress of a shelter and then euthanasia (or potentially being adopted out to another underprepared family).
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Irresponsible rescue
Old 01-22-2021, 03:01 PM
  #20

I agree with so many PPs. The rescue either takes the dog back immediately, or you take the dog to a shelter or to be euthanized. There are some rescues who are NOT honest about a dogís background and/or bite history. There is NO way they should be blaming you! Not all dogs can or should be saved.

I would worry about the next innocent person who may try to rescue this dog. For that reason, I would consider humane euthanasia.
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Old 01-22-2021, 05:30 PM
  #21

Quote:
I know sometimes it can feel overwhelming but with some minor changes and consistency he can get back to the boy you adopte
The more I think about this, the more that I get. I had a fear reactive dog who never bit a person or drew blood on a dog but who needed constant vigilance when “out in the world” and also extra management and consideration at home with our other dog and cat.

Owning her dramatically changed the course of our life. I don’t regret keeping her and that’s not to say that our life was necessarily made worse because of her, but it was very clearly changed.

So to hear someone say that a dog who has bitten to cause damage *multiple times* just needs “some minor” changes seems to me the utmost in irresponsibility and deception.

Dogs are experts at tempering their bites. A bite that needs stitches is not an accident.*

Either the rescue is purposefully deceiving you to make their lives easier, or they are too ignorant to be allowed to “rescue.”


*I do also acknowledge that just because a bite is not an accident, doesn’t mean it’s always the dog’s fault. Some people do harass their dogs into a corner where a bite “comes out of nowhere” but someone who knows dogs could see the bite came after a whole lot of warnings.

But whether Russel is simply temperamentally unstable, which unfortunately a lot of American dogs are these days, or he’s been traumatized into being a biter before you got him, or you personally are triggering his bites because you aren’t understanding his body language, it is clear he cannot stay with you.
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